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How to Write an Essay Outline | Guidelines & Examples

Published on August 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

An essay outline is a way of planning the structure of your essay before you start writing. It involves writing quick summary sentences or phrases for every point you will cover in each paragraph , giving you a picture of how your argument will unfold.

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Table of contents

Organizing your material, presentation of the outline, examples of essay outlines, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about essay outlines.

At the stage where you’re writing an essay outline, your ideas are probably still not fully formed. You should know your topic  and have already done some preliminary research to find relevant sources , but now you need to shape your ideas into a structured argument.

Creating categories

Look over any information, quotes and ideas you’ve noted down from your research and consider the central point you want to make in the essay—this will be the basis of your thesis statement . Once you have an idea of your overall argument, you can begin to organize your material in a way that serves that argument.

Try to arrange your material into categories related to different aspects of your argument. If you’re writing about a literary text, you might group your ideas into themes; in a history essay, it might be several key trends or turning points from the period you’re discussing.

Three main themes or subjects is a common structure for essays. Depending on the length of the essay, you could split the themes into three body paragraphs, or three longer sections with several paragraphs covering each theme.

As you create the outline, look critically at your categories and points: Are any of them irrelevant or redundant? Make sure every topic you cover is clearly related to your thesis statement.

Order of information

When you have your material organized into several categories, consider what order they should appear in.

Your essay will always begin and end with an introduction and conclusion , but the organization of the body is up to you.

Consider these questions to order your material:

  • Is there an obvious starting point for your argument?
  • Is there one subject that provides an easy transition into another?
  • Do some points need to be set up by discussing other points first?

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Within each paragraph, you’ll discuss a single idea related to your overall topic or argument, using several points of evidence or analysis to do so.

In your outline, you present these points as a few short numbered sentences or phrases.They can be split into sub-points when more detail is needed.

The template below shows how you might structure an outline for a five-paragraph essay.

  • Thesis statement
  • First piece of evidence
  • Second piece of evidence
  • Summary/synthesis
  • Importance of topic
  • Strong closing statement

You can choose whether to write your outline in full sentences or short phrases. Be consistent in your choice; don’t randomly write some points as full sentences and others as short phrases.

Examples of outlines for different types of essays are presented below: an argumentative, expository, and literary analysis essay.

Argumentative essay outline

This outline is for a short argumentative essay evaluating the internet’s impact on education. It uses short phrases to summarize each point.

Its body is split into three paragraphs, each presenting arguments about a different aspect of the internet’s effects on education.

  • Importance of the internet
  • Concerns about internet use
  • Thesis statement: Internet use a net positive
  • Data exploring this effect
  • Analysis indicating it is overstated
  • Students’ reading levels over time
  • Why this data is questionable
  • Video media
  • Interactive media
  • Speed and simplicity of online research
  • Questions about reliability (transitioning into next topic)
  • Evidence indicating its ubiquity
  • Claims that it discourages engagement with academic writing
  • Evidence that Wikipedia warns students not to cite it
  • Argument that it introduces students to citation
  • Summary of key points
  • Value of digital education for students
  • Need for optimism to embrace advantages of the internet

Expository essay outline

This is the outline for an expository essay describing how the invention of the printing press affected life and politics in Europe.

The paragraphs are still summarized in short phrases here, but individual points are described with full sentences.

  • Claim that the printing press marks the end of the Middle Ages.
  • Provide background on the low levels of literacy before the printing press.
  • Present the thesis statement: The invention of the printing press increased circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.
  • Discuss the very high levels of illiteracy in medieval Europe.
  • Describe how literacy and thus knowledge and education were mainly the domain of religious and political elites.
  • Indicate how this discouraged political and religious change.
  • Describe the invention of the printing press in 1440 by Johannes Gutenberg.
  • Show the implications of the new technology for book production.
  • Describe the rapid spread of the technology and the printing of the Gutenberg Bible.
  • Link to the Reformation.
  • Discuss the trend for translating the Bible into vernacular languages during the years following the printing press’s invention.
  • Describe Luther’s own translation of the Bible during the Reformation.
  • Sketch out the large-scale effects the Reformation would have on religion and politics.
  • Summarize the history described.
  • Stress the significance of the printing press to the events of this period.

Literary analysis essay outline

The literary analysis essay outlined below discusses the role of theater in Jane Austen’s novel Mansfield Park .

The body of the essay is divided into three different themes, each of which is explored through examples from the book.

  • Describe the theatricality of Austen’s works
  • Outline the role theater plays in Mansfield Park
  • Introduce the research question : How does Austen use theater to express the characters’ morality in Mansfield Park ?
  • Discuss Austen’s depiction of the performance at the end of the first volume
  • Discuss how Sir Bertram reacts to the acting scheme
  • Introduce Austen’s use of stage direction–like details during dialogue
  • Explore how these are deployed to show the characters’ self-absorption
  • Discuss Austen’s description of Maria and Julia’s relationship as polite but affectionless
  • Compare Mrs. Norris’s self-conceit as charitable despite her idleness
  • Summarize the three themes: The acting scheme, stage directions, and the performance of morals
  • Answer the research question
  • Indicate areas for further study

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You will sometimes be asked to hand in an essay outline before you start writing your essay . Your supervisor wants to see that you have a clear idea of your structure so that writing will go smoothly.

Even when you do not have to hand it in, writing an essay outline is an important part of the writing process . It’s a good idea to write one (as informally as you like) to clarify your structure for yourself whenever you are working on an essay.

If you have to hand in your essay outline , you may be given specific guidelines stating whether you have to use full sentences. If you’re not sure, ask your supervisor.

When writing an essay outline for yourself, the choice is yours. Some students find it helpful to write out their ideas in full sentences, while others prefer to summarize them in short phrases.

You should try to follow your outline as you write your essay . However, if your ideas change or it becomes clear that your structure could be better, it’s okay to depart from your essay outline . Just make sure you know why you’re doing so.

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Argumentative Essay Guide

Argumentative Essay Outline

Nova A.

Argumentative Essay Outline: How to Structure Your Argumentative Essay

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Published on: Feb 11, 2018

Last updated on: Nov 22, 2023

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Preparing to write an argumentative essay but don’t know where to start?

Making an outline is an important step in prewriting. Having a defined outline makes the essay writing process much simpler. It helps you logically present your ideas and saves you from getting stuck with writer’s block. 

In this blog, we are going to teach you about how to write an outline for your essay. You’ll also get examples and templates to help you out.

So continue reading!

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How To Write An Argumentative Essay Outline?

A simple argumentative essay outline follows the same structure as any other type of essay. The difference lies in the content of the body paragraphs. Unlike a persuasive essay, where the focus is on convincing the reader through emotional appeals, the argumentative essay presents the argument.

Some paragraphs introduce your own argument, while others state the opposing arguments and their refutations. 

Here is an argumentative essay outline template you could follow for writing your essay:

The most common structure to craft an argumentative essay is as follows:

1. Argumentative Essay Introduction 

The introductory paragraph introduces the main argument and provides a brief background of the argumentative essay topic you chose. Essay introductions act as a roadmap for the entire essay. For an argumentative essay, this is where you lay the foundation for your argument.  An introduction comprises the following essential components: 

  • Hook Statement

A hook statement is written to grab the attention of your reader immediately. It should intrigue the reader and make them read the complete essay. For example, if you are writing an argumentative essay on animal testing, your hook statement could be: 

  • Background Information 

Provide brief background information about your argument and the main claim of your essay. It will make it easier for the reader to understand the argument you will make in your essay.  For example:

  • Thesis Statement

An argumentative essay thesis statement should highlight your perspective, stance, and reason for your position. A thesis statement must be clearly defined, arguable, and defendable. It should express the importance of your argument and a reason why the reader should read your essay. For Example:

In case you're looking for some inspiration for your topic, check out our argumentative essay topics blog!

2. Argumentative Essay Supporting Paragraphs 

In the body paragraph, you present your point of view and provide evidence that supports your argument. The goal here is to explain how valid your claim is by providing evidence that strengthens your argument. 

For Example:

Here are four basic things that a body paragraph should state.

a. The purpose: Why are you making an argument about a particular issue? 

b. Topic sentence: This is a fact or an example that helps the reader better understand your argument. The topic sentence of a paragraph should focus on just one point.

c. Provide evidence: State facts with examples and statistics that support your thesis statement and the topic sentence. Make sure that you have collected authentic evidence from credible sources. 

d. Concluding sentence: The concluding sentence should reassert how the topic sentence helps the reader better understand the claim. 

3. Argumentative Essay Counter Arguments Paragraph 

The counter-argument is the other side of the issue that you will prove wrong by stating the specific reasons. In this paragraph, you mention the opposing views that the reader might pose against your argument and refute them.  Conclude this paragraph by reasserting the thought provoking central idea of your essay.

4. Argumentative Essay Conclusion

A good argumentative essay conclusion summarizes the entire discussion of the essay and provides a call to action. It holds the same significance as the introduction paragraph. Here, you restate your thesis statement to remind the reader of your essay’s overall argument. Tell the reader that you have critically analyzed both sides of the argument. And based on the evidence, you have proved your side of the argument right. Explain the importance of your argument and bring your discussion to a logical end. You can propose a solution if your claim has specified a problem or make future predictions about the claim. Tell your reader the consequences if your argument is not believed and what good will happen if it's believed.

Here is an example:

Use the following argumentative essay outline graphic organizer to structure your essay efficiently.

Argumentative Essay Outline Graphic Organizer

Here’s a video demonstrating how you can prepare an argumentative essay outline:

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Types of Arguments and Argumentative Essay Outlines

Your argumentative essay structure is affected by the type of argument you are using. There are three argumentative writing models: Classical, Rogerian, and Toulmin. 

Let's take a look at each one:

Classical Argument

The classical argument is the oldest and most used argument model. It is based on the principles of rhetoric, which is the art of persuasion. This type of argument has a clear structure with distinct steps, making it an ideal choice for an essay or paper.

Here is the classical argumentative writing structure.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Rogerian argument.

The Rogerian model allows both sides of an issue to be discussed to reach a common ground.

Unlike the classical approach, the Rogerian argument seeks to understand both sides of an issue before moving forward. This style of argumentation does not look for a single ‘right’ answer but seeks to create a dialogue between all parties.

Rhetorical Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Toulmin argument.

The Toulmin argument is a model that breaks down an issue into its component parts to analyze it more thoroughly. The Toulmin argument is composed of six parts: a claim, grounds, warrant, backing, qualifier, and rebuttal.

The first part lays out the main point being argued (the “claim”) . This is followed by the evidence that supports it (the “grounds”) . It is then connected to an underlying assumption or principle (the “warrant”) . 

The warrant is then supported by additional evidence (the “backing”) , which may be followed by qualifications (the “qualifier”) . Finally, the argument may anticipate and address possible counterarguments (the “rebuttal”) .

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline Template

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Need more sample essays to get a better idea? Give our argumentative essay examples a read!

The Bottom Line! We've covered all the essential elements of structuring your argumentative essay. With this guide, you're now well-prepared to craft a compelling essay that effectively presents your viewpoint and supports your argument with evidence. 

Remember the key components: the introduction that hooks your reader, a clear thesis statement, well-organized body paragraphs, counterarguments, and a strong conclusion. Don't forget to cite your sources properly to give credibility to your work. 

If you are unable to craft a perfect outline, you can always seek the help of an expert and professional essay writer at MyPerfectWords.com.

Our affordable argumentative essay writing service can help you write a top-notch argumentative paper. Our expert writers conduct research to find facts and evidence to support your claim and write an original essay according to your needs.

So reach out to our custom essay writing service today! 

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Nova Allison is a Digital Content Strategist with over eight years of experience. Nova has also worked as a technical and scientific writer. She is majorly involved in developing and reviewing online content plans that engage and resonate with audiences. Nova has a passion for writing that engages and informs her readers.

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Argumentative Essay – Outline, Form, and Examples

Daniel Bal

What is an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay requires the writer to investigate a specific topic by collecting and evaluating evidence to establish a position on the subject matter.

argumentative essay outline examples

When preparing to compose a good argumentative essay, utilize the following steps:

Step 1: Select a topic.

Step 2: Identify a position.

Step 3: Locate appropriate resources.

Step 4: Identify evidence supporting the position. ( NOTE: If there is little evidence in support of the claim, consider re-examining the main argument.)

Steps to write an argumentative essay

When gathering evidence, use credible sources . To determine the credibility of the source, consider authority, currency, accuracy, and objectivity:

Who is the author ? Are they an expert in the field? Has a reputable publisher published the work?

How current is the information in the source? Does the currency of the source matter? Does the age of the source impact the content? Is there newer information that disproves the source’s information?

Can other sources verify the accuracy of the information? Does the information contradict that found in other commonly accepted sources?

Is there any evidence of bias, or is the source objective ? Is the research sponsored by an organization that may skew the information?

The following are typically recognized as providing appropriate, credible research material:

Peer-reviewed journals/research papers

Government agencies

Professional organizations

Library databases

Reference books

Credible sources

Writers should avoid using the following sources:

Social media posts

Out-of-date materials

Step 5: Utilize the research to determine a thesis statement that identifies the topic, position, and support(s).

Step 6: Use the evidence to construct an outline, detailing the main supports and relevant evidence.

Steps to write an argumentative essay

Argumentative essay outline

After gathering all of the necessary research, the next step in composing an argumentative essay focuses on organizing the information through the use of an outline:

Introduction

Attention Grabber/Hook

Background Information: Include any background information pertinent to the topic that the reader needs to know to understand the argument.

Thesis: State the position in connection to the main topic and identify the supports that will help prove the argument.

Topic sentence

Identify evidence in support of the claim in the topic sentence

Explain how the evidence supports the argument

Evidence 3 (Continue as needed)

Support 2 (Continue as needed)

Restate thesis

Review main supports

Concluding statement

Invite the audience to take a specific action.

Identify the overall importance of the topic and position.

Argumentative essay outline

How to write an argumentative essay

Regardless of the writer’s topic or point of view, an argumentative essay should include an introductory paragraph, body paragraphs, a conclusion, and works cited.

Background information

Body Paragraphs

Analysis of evidence

Rephrased thesis

Review of main ideas

Call to action

Works Cited

Components of an argumentative essay

Argumentative essay introduction

The introduction sets the tone for the entire paper and introduces the argument. In general, the first paragraph(s) should attract the reader’s attention, provide relevant context, and conclude with a thesis statement.

To attract the reader's attention , start with an introductory device. There are several attention-grabbing techniques, the most common of which consist of the following:

The writer can emphasize the topic’s importance by explaining the current interest in the topic or indicating that the subject is influential.

Pertinent statistics give the paper an air of authority.

There are many reasons for a stimulating statement to surprise a reader. Sometimes it is joyful; sometimes it is shocking; sometimes it is surprising because of who said it.

An interesting incident or anecdote can act as a teaser to lure the reader into the remainder of the essay. Be sure that the device is appropriate for the subject and focus of what follows.

Provide the reader with relevant context and background information necessary to understand the topic.

Conclude with a thesis statement that identifies the overall purpose of the essay (topic and position). Writers can also include their support directly in the thesis, which outlines the structure of the essay for the reader.

Avoid the following when writing the introduction to argumentative writing:

Starting with dictionary definitions is too overdone and unappealing.

Do not make an announcement of the topic like “In this paper I will…” or “The purpose of this essay is to….”

Evidence supporting or developing the thesis should be in the body paragraphs, not the introduction.

Beginning the essay with general or absolute statements such as “throughout history...” or “as human beings we always...” or similar statements suggest the writer knows all of history or that all people behave or think in the same way.

Argumentative essay thesis

The thesis statement is the single, specific claim the writer sets out to prove and is typically positioned as the last sentence of the introduction . It is the controlling idea of the entire argument that identifies the topic, position, and reasoning.

When constructing a thesis for an argumentative paper, make sure it contains a side of the argument, not simply a topic. An argumentative thesis identifies the writer’s position on a given topic. If a position cannot be taken, then it is not argumentative thesis:

Topic: Capital punishment is practiced in many states.

Thesis: Capital punishment should be illegal.

While not always required, the thesis statement can include the supports the writer will use to prove the main claim. Therefore, a thesis statement can be structured as follows:

TOPIC + POSITION (+ SUPPORTS)

No Supports: College athletes (TOPIC) should be financially compensated (POSITION).

Supports: College athletes (TOPIC) should be financially compensated (POSITION) because they sacrifice their minds and bodies (SUPPORT 1), cannot hold

Argumentative essay body paragraphs

Body paragraphs can be of varying lengths, but they must present a coherent argument unified under a single topic. They are rarely ever longer than one page, double-spaced; usually they are much shorter.

Lengthy paragraphs indicate a lack of structure. Identify the main ideas of a lengthy paragraph to determine if they make more sense as separate topics in separate paragraphs.

Shorter paragraphs usually indicate a lack of substance; there is not enough evidence or analysis to prove the argument. Develop the ideas more or integrate the information into another paragraph.

The structure of an argumentative paragraph should include a topic sentence, evidence, and a transition.

The topic sentence is the thesis of the paragraph that identifies the arguable point in support of the main argument. The reader should know exactly what the writer is trying to prove within the paragraph by reading the first sentence.

The supporting evidence and analysis provide information to support the claim. There should be a balance between the evidence (facts, quotations, summary of events/plot, etc.) and analysis (interpretation of evidence). If the paragraph is evidence-heavy, there is not much of an argument; if it is analysis-heavy, there is not enough evidence in support of the claim.

The transition can be at the beginning or the end of a paragraph. However, it is much easier to combine the transition with the concluding observation to help the paragraphs flow into one another. Transitions in academic writing should tell the reader where you were, where you are going, and relate to the thesis.

Some essays may benefit from the inclusion of rebuttals to potential counterarguments of the writer’s position.

Argumentative essay conclusion

The conclusion should make readers glad they read the paper. It can suggest broader implications that will not only interest readers but also enrich their understanding in some way. There are three aspects to follow when constructing the conclusion: rephrase the thesis, synthesize information, and call the reader to action.

Rephrased the thesis in the first sentence of the conclusion. It must be in different words; do not simply write it verbatim.

Synthesize the argument by showing how the paper's main points support the argument.

Propose a course of action or a solution to an issue. This can redirect the reader's thought process to apply the ideas to their life or to see the broader implications of the topic.

Avoid the following when constructing the conclusion:

Beginning with an unnecessary, overused phrase such as "in conclusion," "in summary," or "in closing;" although these phrases can work in speeches, they come across as trite in writing

Introducing a new idea or subtopic in the conclusion

Making sentimental, emotional appeals that are out of character with the rest of the paper

Including evidence (quotations, statistics, etc.) that should be in the body of the paper

Argumentative essay examples

Examples of argumentative essays vary depending upon the type:

Academic essays differ based upon the topic and position. These essays follow a more traditional structure and are typically assigned in high school or college. Examples of academic argumentative essay topics include the following:

Advantages or disadvantages of social media

Animal testing

Art education

Benefit or detriment of homework

Capital punishment

Class warfare

Immigration

School uniforms

Universal healthcare

Violence in video games

Argumentative literary essays are typically more informal and do not follow the same structure as an academic essay. The following are popular examples of argumentative literary essays:

“Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf

“Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell

“Thoughts for the Times on War and Death” by Sigmund Freud

“Does the Truth Matter? Science, Pseudoscience, and Civilization” by Carl Sagan

“Self-Reliance” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Argumentative Essay Writing

Argumentative Essay Outline

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Learn How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline

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It's the night before the essay is due, and you haven't even started. Your mind is blank, and you have no idea what words will persuade your teacher. 

The good news is that some tips and tricks can make the process of writing an argumentative essay much easier.

In this blog, we'll break down the components of an argumentative essay and provide helpful tips and examples along the way. By the end, you should have all the guidelines to create a winning essay that will persuade your readers.

Let's take a closer look at all these steps.

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How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline?

An argumentative essay outline is a plan through which the writer works and organizes the raw data. An outline provides a track to follow for your papers and essays. 

The outline helps you stick to the critical things making sure that you did not miss important information in the content. 

Outlining might confuse you if you have never developed one before. However, once you know how to create one, it will be a lot easier to draft a perfect argumentative essay. 

An argumentative essay consists of several equally important parts. These sections individually state the topic, arguments, evidence and supporting statements, etc. 

The significant parts of an argumentative essay outline are:

  • Introduction 
  • Body Paragraphs
  • Conclusion 

Creating each section systematically is a fundamental requirement of an outline. Learn how to make each part of the outline professionally in the following area. 

Argumentative Essay Introduction

Just like any other academic writing, you need a foundation on which to build your essay. An introduction is the foundation of your essay. 

A proper and perfect essay introduction will make your paper flawless and vice-versa. 

An introduction of an argumentative essay includes a hook, background information, and a thesis statement. 

A hook is an opening statement of the essay’s introduction. It serves the purpose of grabbing the reader’s attention toward the content. 

A hook can be a quotation, anecdote, question, funny/sarcastic statement, fact, statistic, etc.

For example, the major cause of obesity in the United States is fast food. 

  • Background Information

Here you present some background information about the topic. The background information should answer the following questions:

  • What is the issue you are going to talk about?
  • Who is your audience?
  • Where is the selected issue prevalent?
  • Why is the issue important to be discussed?
  • Thesis Statement 

It is the last sentence of your introduction that is the focal point of your essay. It introduces the readers to the topic’s main argument. Then, it states the writer’s position and stands in the essay. 

Support your thesis statement in the body paragraphs of an essay to persuade the audience. 

Argumentative Essay Body Paragraphs

After the introductory paragraphs are written, the next part is the body of the argumentative essay. 

This part of the essay is essential to be structured well as it contains all the claims and pieces of evidence. 

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For essays like an argumentative essays, it is imperative to make your claim in writing. A claim, or the core argument, is the basis of your entire essay. If you want your essay to be right in quality, make sure that the claims made are strong. 

You can support your claim with strong evidence. 

The purpose of making a claim is to define the:

  • Support your request and the basic argument

In the main body, present your claim in the topic sentence . And let the audience know what the specific paragraph is about. However, also show your point of view.

Making a claim in an argumentative essay is not enough. Making people believe your stance is what the objective of the writer is. 

For this purpose, you need to support your argument with evidence and supporting facts. 

You have to clear your position as a writer by providing relevant stuff showing your claims’ validity and accuracy. 

The reality of your claim entirely depends on the credibility and reliability of the facts you provide. 

There are five types of evidence that are used to prove the preliminary thesis statement:

  • Real-life examples
  • Authorities
  • Hypothetical situations 
  • Include an Opponent’s Argument 

While collecting information for your essay, students often ignore the opposing arguments. 

When writing an argumentative essay, a writer shouldn’t just talk about his claim and support it with evidence. 

After providing evidence for your claim, identify and include opposing views and counter-arguments and debunk them. 

There is always another side to the argument. Use evidence to disprove these opposing sides and arguments. 

Argumentative Essay Conclusion

The last part of the writing process of the outline is the conclusion . Now that you have adequately structured the introduction and the body paragraphs, it’s time to conclude your essay. 

The power of a conclusion is often underestimated. If the ending is vague, abrupt, and not good, your whole essay will be a waste. 

The following things conclude an argumentative essay:

  • Restating your thesis statement.
  • Summarizing basic arguments.
  • Recommending a course of action to the readers. 

Make sure that the length of the conclusion is the same as the introduction. Short and precise conclusions are effective. 

In conclusion, a writer should never introduce new ideas and extra information. 

A precise and direct conclusion will increase the quality of your essay to extremes. 

For essays like these, personal knowledge is not enough. You always have to research the essay topic and subject chosen to make healthy and valid points. Gather facts and accurate information to make your essay effective and credible. 

Types of Arguments

When it comes to constructing an argument for your essay, there are several types of arguments you can use. These include 

Rogerian Argument

The Rogerian argument is based on the assumption that two sides of an issue can both be right. 

This type of argument encourages the writer to look at both sides of the issue.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Toulmin argument.

The Toulmin argument is one of the most popular types of arguments used in essay writing.

This type of argument follows a specific structure. It begins with an introduction, then presents evidence and draws conclusions based on that evidence. 

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Classical argument.

A classical argument is a traditional approach to constructing an argument. 

This structure involves setting up your opinion, presenting opposing arguments, and refuting those arguments. After that, you can reiterate your point of view in a conclusion.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline Template

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Argumentative Essay Outline Examples

The outline used to write an argumentative essay can also be used for persuasive essay writing . A few outline examples of an argumentative essay outline are given below: 

Argumentative Essay Outline PDF

Argumentative Essay Outline Example

Conclusion Argumentative Essay Outline

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Research Argumentative Essay Outline

Argumentative Essay Outline College

Argumentative Essay Outline Sample

Argumentative Essay Outline AP Lang

MLA Argumentative Essay Outline

5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay Outline

Summing it up, your whole argumentative essay depends on the outline you make for it. So the outline for your essay should be detailed and direct to make your essay persuasive and readable. 

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Frequently Asked Questions

What are the 4 parts of an argumentative essay.

The four main parts of an argumentative essay are: 

  • Introduction 
  • Thesis statement 
  • Main body paragraphs 
  • Conclusion 

What are good topics to write an argumentative essay?

Here are some good argumentative essay topics. 

  • Should self-driving cars be legal? 
  • Should video games be a sport? 
  • All students must wear a uniform in high school. 
  • Is the cost of college too high? 
  • Is globalization a good thing? 

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argumentative essay outline examples

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8 Effective Strategies to Write Argumentative Essays

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In a bustling university town, there lived a student named Alex. Popular for creativity and wit, one challenge seemed insurmountable for Alex– the dreaded argumentative essay!

One gloomy afternoon, as the rain tapped against the window pane, Alex sat at his cluttered desk, staring at a blank document on the computer screen. The assignment loomed large: a 350-600-word argumentative essay on a topic of their choice . With a sigh, he decided to seek help of mentor, Professor Mitchell, who was known for his passion for writing.

Entering Professor Mitchell’s office was like stepping into a treasure of knowledge. Bookshelves lined every wall, faint aroma of old manuscripts in the air and sticky notes over the wall. Alex took a deep breath and knocked on his door.

“Ah, Alex,” Professor Mitchell greeted with a warm smile. “What brings you here today?”

Alex confessed his struggles with the argumentative essay. After hearing his concerns, Professor Mitchell said, “Ah, the argumentative essay! Don’t worry, Let’s take a look at it together.” As he guided Alex to the corner shelf, Alex asked,

Table of Contents

“What is an Argumentative Essay?”

The professor replied, “An argumentative essay is a type of academic writing that presents a clear argument or a firm position on a contentious issue. Unlike other forms of essays, such as descriptive or narrative essays, these essays require you to take a stance, present evidence, and convince your audience of the validity of your viewpoint with supporting evidence. A well-crafted argumentative essay relies on concrete facts and supporting evidence rather than merely expressing the author’s personal opinions . Furthermore, these essays demand comprehensive research on the chosen topic and typically follows a structured format consisting of three primary sections: an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph.”

He continued, “Argumentative essays are written in a wide range of subject areas, reflecting their applicability across disciplines. They are written in different subject areas like literature and philosophy, history, science and technology, political science, psychology, economics and so on.

Alex asked,

“When is an Argumentative Essay Written?”

The professor answered, “Argumentative essays are often assigned in academic settings, but they can also be written for various other purposes, such as editorials, opinion pieces, or blog posts. Some situations to write argumentative essays include:

1. Academic assignments

In school or college, teachers may assign argumentative essays as part of coursework. It help students to develop critical thinking and persuasive writing skills .

2. Debates and discussions

Argumentative essays can serve as the basis for debates or discussions in academic or competitive settings. Moreover, they provide a structured way to present and defend your viewpoint.

3. Opinion pieces

Newspapers, magazines, and online publications often feature opinion pieces that present an argument on a current issue or topic to influence public opinion.

4. Policy proposals

In government and policy-related fields, argumentative essays are used to propose and defend specific policy changes or solutions to societal problems.

5. Persuasive speeches

Before delivering a persuasive speech, it’s common to prepare an argumentative essay as a foundation for your presentation.

Regardless of the context, an argumentative essay should present a clear thesis statement , provide evidence and reasoning to support your position, address counterarguments, and conclude with a compelling summary of your main points. The goal is to persuade readers or listeners to accept your viewpoint or at least consider it seriously.”

Handing over a book, the professor continued, “Take a look on the elements or structure of an argumentative essay.”

Elements of an Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay comprises five essential components:

Claim in argumentative writing is the central argument or viewpoint that the writer aims to establish and defend throughout the essay. A claim must assert your position on an issue and must be arguable. It can guide the entire argument.

2. Evidence

Evidence must consist of factual information, data, examples, or expert opinions that support the claim. Also, it lends credibility by strengthening the writer’s position.

3. Counterarguments

Presenting a counterclaim demonstrates fairness and awareness of alternative perspectives.

4. Rebuttal

After presenting the counterclaim, the writer refutes it by offering counterarguments or providing evidence that weakens the opposing viewpoint. It shows that the writer has considered multiple perspectives and is prepared to defend their position.

The format of an argumentative essay typically follows the structure to ensure clarity and effectiveness in presenting an argument.

How to Write An Argumentative Essay

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to write an argumentative essay:

1. Introduction

  • Begin with a compelling sentence or question to grab the reader’s attention.
  • Provide context for the issue, including relevant facts, statistics, or historical background.
  • Provide a concise thesis statement to present your position on the topic.

2. Body Paragraphs (usually three or more)

  • Start each paragraph with a clear and focused topic sentence that relates to your thesis statement.
  • Furthermore, provide evidence and explain the facts, statistics, examples, expert opinions, and quotations from credible sources that supports your thesis.
  • Use transition sentences to smoothly move from one point to the next.

3. Counterargument and Rebuttal

  • Acknowledge opposing viewpoints or potential objections to your argument.
  • Also, address these counterarguments with evidence and explain why they do not weaken your position.

4. Conclusion

  • Restate your thesis statement and summarize the key points you’ve made in the body of the essay.
  • Leave the reader with a final thought, call to action, or broader implication related to the topic.

5. Citations and References

  • Properly cite all the sources you use in your essay using a consistent citation style.
  • Also, include a bibliography or works cited at the end of your essay.

6. Formatting and Style

  • Follow any specific formatting guidelines provided by your instructor or institution.
  • Use a professional and academic tone in your writing and edit your essay to avoid content, spelling and grammar mistakes .

Remember that the specific requirements for formatting an argumentative essay may vary depending on your instructor’s guidelines or the citation style you’re using (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago). Always check the assignment instructions or style guide for any additional requirements or variations in formatting.

Prof. Mitchell continued, “An argumentative essay can adopt various approaches when dealing with opposing perspectives. It may offer a balanced presentation of both sides, providing equal weight to each, or it may advocate more strongly for one side while still acknowledging the existence of opposing views.” As Alex listened carefully to the Professor’s thoughts, his eyes fell on a page with examples of argumentative essay.

Example of an Argumentative Essay

Alex picked the book and read the example. It helped him to understand the concept. Furthermore, he could now connect better to the elements and steps of the essay which Prof. Mitchell had mentioned earlier. Aren’t you keen to know how an argumentative essay should be like? Here is an example of a well-crafted argumentative essay , which was read by Alex. After Alex finished reading the example, the professor turned the page and continued, “Check this page to know the importance of writing an argumentative essay in developing skills of an individual.”

Importance of an Argumentative Essay

Importance_of_an_ArgumentativeEssays

After understanding the benefits, Alex was convinced by the ability of the argumentative essays in advocating one’s beliefs and favor the author’s position. Alex asked,

“How are argumentative essays different from the other types?”

Prof. Mitchell answered, “Argumentative essays differ from other types of essays primarily in their purpose, structure, and approach in presenting information. Unlike expository essays, argumentative essays persuade the reader to adopt a particular point of view or take a specific action on a controversial issue. Furthermore, they differ from descriptive essays by not focusing vividly on describing a topic. Also, they are less engaging through storytelling as compared to the narrative essays.

Alex said, “Given the direct and persuasive nature of argumentative essays, can you suggest some strategies to write an effective argumentative essay?

Turning the pages of the book, Prof. Mitchell replied, “Sure! You can check this infographic to get some tips for writing an argumentative essay.”

Effective Strategies to Write an Argumentative Essay

StrategiesOfWritingArgumentativeEssays

As days turned into weeks, Alex diligently worked on his essay. He researched, gathered evidence, and refined his thesis. It was a long and challenging journey, filled with countless drafts and revisions.

Finally, the day arrived when Alex submitted their essay. As he clicked the “Submit” button, a sense of accomplishment washed over him. He realized that the argumentative essay, while challenging, had improved his critical thinking and transformed him into a more confident writer. Furthermore, Alex received feedback from his professor, a mix of praise and constructive criticism. It was a humbling experience, a reminder that every journey has its obstacles and opportunities for growth.

Frequently Asked Questions

An argumentative essay can be written as follows- 1. Choose a Topic 2. Research and Collect Evidences 3. Develop a Clear Thesis Statement 4. Outline Your Essay- Introduction, Body Paragraphs and Conclusion 5. Revise and Edit 6. Format and Cite Sources 7. Final Review

One must choose a clear, concise and specific statement as a claim. It must be debatable and establish your position. Avoid using ambiguous or unclear while making a claim. To strengthen your claim, address potential counterarguments or opposing viewpoints. Additionally, use persuasive language and rhetoric to make your claim more compelling

Starting an argument essay effectively is crucial to engage your readers and establish the context for your argument. Here’s how you can start an argument essay are: 1. Begin With an Engaging Hook 2. Provide Background Information 3. Present Your Thesis Statement 4. Briefly Outline Your Main 5. Establish Your Credibility

The key features of an argumentative essay are: 1. Clear and Specific Thesis Statement 2. Credible Evidence 3. Counterarguments 4. Structured Body Paragraph 5. Logical Flow 6. Use of Persuasive Techniques 7. Formal Language

An argumentative essay typically consists of the following main parts or sections: 1. Introduction 2. Body Paragraphs 3. Counterargument and Rebuttal 4. Conclusion 5. References (if applicable)

The main purpose of an argumentative essay is to persuade the reader to accept or agree with a particular viewpoint or position on a controversial or debatable topic. In other words, the primary goal of an argumentative essay is to convince the audience that the author's argument or thesis statement is valid, logical, and well-supported by evidence and reasoning.

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What is an Argumentative Essay? How to Write It (With Examples)

Argumentative Essay

We define an argumentative essay as a type of essay that presents arguments about both sides of an issue. The purpose is to convince the reader to accept a particular viewpoint or action. In an argumentative essay, the writer takes a stance on a controversial or debatable topic and supports their position with evidence, reasoning, and examples. The essay should also address counterarguments, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the topic.

Table of Contents

  • What is an argumentative essay?  
  • Argumentative essay structure 
  • Argumentative essay outline 
  • Types of argument claims 

How to write an argumentative essay?

  • Argumentative essay writing tips 
  • Good argumentative essay example 

How to write a good thesis

Frequently asked questions, what is an argumentative essay.

An argumentative essay is a type of writing that presents a coherent and logical analysis of a specific topic. 1 The goal is to convince the reader to accept the writer’s point of view or opinion on a particular issue. Here are the key elements of an argumentative essay: 

  • Thesis Statement : The central claim or argument that the essay aims to prove. 
  • Introduction : Provides background information and introduces the thesis statement. 
  • Body Paragraphs : Each paragraph addresses a specific aspect of the argument, presents evidence, and may include counterarguments. 
  • Evidence : Supports the main argument with relevant facts, examples, statistics, or expert opinions. 
  • Counterarguments : Anticipates and addresses opposing viewpoints to strengthen the overall argument. 
  • Conclusion : Summarizes the main points, reinforces the thesis, and may suggest implications or actions. 

argumentative essay outline examples

Argumentative essay structure

Aristotelian, Rogerian, and Toulmin are three distinct approaches to argumentative essay structures, each with its principles and methods. 2 The choice depends on the purpose and nature of the topic. Here’s an overview of each type of argumentative essay format.

Argumentative essay outline

An argumentative essay presents a specific claim or argument and supports it with evidence and reasoning. Here’s an outline for an argumentative essay, along with examples for each section: 3  

1.  Introduction : 

  • Hook : Start with a compelling statement, question, or anecdote to grab the reader’s attention. 

Example: “Did you know that plastic pollution is threatening marine life at an alarming rate?” 

  • Background information : Provide brief context about the issue. 

Example: “Plastic pollution has become a global environmental concern, with millions of tons of plastic waste entering our oceans yearly.” 

  • Thesis statement : Clearly state your main argument or position. 

Example: “We must take immediate action to reduce plastic usage and implement more sustainable alternatives to protect our marine ecosystem.” 

2.  Body Paragraphs : 

  • Topic sentence : Introduce the main idea of each paragraph. 

Example: “The first step towards addressing the plastic pollution crisis is reducing single-use plastic consumption.” 

  • Evidence/Support : Provide evidence, facts, statistics, or examples that support your argument. 

Example: “Research shows that plastic straws alone contribute to millions of tons of plastic waste annually, and many marine animals suffer from ingestion or entanglement.” 

  • Counterargument/Refutation : Acknowledge and refute opposing viewpoints. 

Example: “Some argue that banning plastic straws is inconvenient for consumers, but the long-term environmental benefits far outweigh the temporary inconvenience.” 

  • Transition : Connect each paragraph to the next. 

Example: “Having addressed the issue of single-use plastics, the focus must now shift to promoting sustainable alternatives.” 

3.  Counterargument Paragraph : 

  • Acknowledgement of opposing views : Recognize alternative perspectives on the issue. 

Example: “While some may argue that individual actions cannot significantly impact global plastic pollution, the cumulative effect of collective efforts must be considered.” 

  • Counterargument and rebuttal : Present and refute the main counterargument. 

Example: “However, individual actions, when multiplied across millions of people, can substantially reduce plastic waste. Small changes in behavior, such as using reusable bags and containers, can have a significant positive impact.” 

4.  Conclusion : 

  • Restatement of thesis : Summarize your main argument. 

Example: “In conclusion, adopting sustainable practices and reducing single-use plastic is crucial for preserving our oceans and marine life.” 

  • Call to action : Encourage the reader to take specific steps or consider the argument’s implications. 

Example: “It is our responsibility to make environmentally conscious choices and advocate for policies that prioritize the health of our planet. By collectively embracing sustainable alternatives, we can contribute to a cleaner and healthier future.” 

argumentative essay outline examples

Types of argument claims

A claim is a statement or proposition a writer puts forward with evidence to persuade the reader. 4 Here are some common types of argument claims, along with examples: 

  • Fact Claims : These claims assert that something is true or false and can often be verified through evidence.  Example: “Water boils at 100°C at sea level.”
  • Value Claims : Value claims express judgments about the worth or morality of something, often based on personal beliefs or societal values. Example: “Organic farming is more ethical than conventional farming.” 
  • Policy Claims : Policy claims propose a course of action or argue for a specific policy, law, or regulation change.  Example: “Schools should adopt a year-round education system to improve student learning outcomes.” 
  • Cause and Effect Claims : These claims argue that one event or condition leads to another, establishing a cause-and-effect relationship.  Example: “Excessive use of social media is a leading cause of increased feelings of loneliness among young adults.” 
  • Definition Claims : Definition claims assert the meaning or classification of a concept or term.  Example: “Artificial intelligence can be defined as machines exhibiting human-like cognitive functions.” 
  • Comparative Claims : Comparative claims assert that one thing is better or worse than another in certain respects.  Example: “Online education is more cost-effective than traditional classroom learning.” 
  • Evaluation Claims : Evaluation claims assess the quality, significance, or effectiveness of something based on specific criteria.  Example: “The new healthcare policy is more effective in providing affordable healthcare to all citizens.” 

Understanding these argument claims can help writers construct more persuasive and well-supported arguments tailored to the specific nature of the claim.  

If you’re wondering how to start an argumentative essay, here’s a step-by-step guide to help you with the argumentative essay format and writing process.

  • Choose a Topic: Select a topic that you are passionate about or interested in. Ensure that the topic is debatable and has two or more sides.
  • Define Your Position: Clearly state your stance on the issue. Consider opposing viewpoints and be ready to counter them.
  • Conduct Research: Gather relevant information from credible sources, such as books, articles, and academic journals. Take notes on key points and supporting evidence.
  • Create a Thesis Statement: Develop a concise and clear thesis statement that outlines your main argument. Convey your position on the issue and provide a roadmap for the essay.
  • Outline Your Argumentative Essay: Organize your ideas logically by creating an outline. Include an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Each body paragraph should focus on a single point that supports your thesis.
  • Write the Introduction: Start with a hook to grab the reader’s attention (a quote, a question, a surprising fact). Provide background information on the topic. Present your thesis statement at the end of the introduction.
  • Develop Body Paragraphs: Begin each paragraph with a clear topic sentence that relates to the thesis. Support your points with evidence and examples. Address counterarguments and refute them to strengthen your position. Ensure smooth transitions between paragraphs.
  • Address Counterarguments: Acknowledge and respond to opposing viewpoints. Anticipate objections and provide evidence to counter them.
  • Write the Conclusion: Summarize the main points of your argumentative essay. Reinforce the significance of your argument. End with a call to action, a prediction, or a thought-provoking statement.
  • Revise, Edit, and Share: Review your essay for clarity, coherence, and consistency. Check for grammatical and spelling errors. Share your essay with peers, friends, or instructors for constructive feedback.
  • Finalize Your Argumentative Essay: Make final edits based on feedback received. Ensure that your essay follows the required formatting and citation style.

Argumentative essay writing tips

Here are eight strategies to craft a compelling argumentative essay: 

  • Choose a Clear and Controversial Topic : Select a topic that sparks debate and has opposing viewpoints. A clear and controversial issue provides a solid foundation for a strong argument. 
  • Conduct Thorough Research : Gather relevant information from reputable sources to support your argument. Use a variety of sources, such as academic journals, books, reputable websites, and expert opinions, to strengthen your position. 
  • Create a Strong Thesis Statement : Clearly articulate your main argument in a concise thesis statement. Your thesis should convey your stance on the issue and provide a roadmap for the reader to follow your argument. 
  • Develop a Logical Structure : Organize your essay with a clear introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Each paragraph should focus on a specific point of evidence that contributes to your overall argument. Ensure a logical flow from one point to the next. 
  • Provide Strong Evidence : Support your claims with solid evidence. Use facts, statistics, examples, and expert opinions to support your arguments. Be sure to cite your sources appropriately to maintain credibility. 
  • Address Counterarguments : Acknowledge opposing viewpoints and counterarguments. Addressing and refuting alternative perspectives strengthens your essay and demonstrates a thorough understanding of the issue. Be mindful of maintaining a respectful tone even when discussing opposing views. 
  • Use Persuasive Language : Employ persuasive language to make your points effectively. Avoid emotional appeals without supporting evidence and strive for a respectful and professional tone. 
  • Craft a Compelling Conclusion : Summarize your main points, restate your thesis, and leave a lasting impression in your conclusion. Encourage readers to consider the implications of your argument and potentially take action. 

argumentative essay outline examples

Good argumentative essay example

Let’s consider a sample of argumentative essay on how social media enhances connectivity:

In the digital age, social media has emerged as a powerful tool that transcends geographical boundaries, connecting individuals from diverse backgrounds and providing a platform for an array of voices to be heard. While critics argue that social media fosters division and amplifies negativity, it is essential to recognize the positive aspects of this digital revolution and how it enhances connectivity by providing a platform for diverse voices to flourish. One of the primary benefits of social media is its ability to facilitate instant communication and connection across the globe. Platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram break down geographical barriers, enabling people to establish and maintain relationships regardless of physical location and fostering a sense of global community. Furthermore, social media has transformed how people stay connected with friends and family. Whether separated by miles or time zones, social media ensures that relationships remain dynamic and relevant, contributing to a more interconnected world. Moreover, social media has played a pivotal role in giving voice to social justice movements and marginalized communities. Movements such as #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo, and #ClimateStrike have gained momentum through social media, allowing individuals to share their stories and advocate for change on a global scale. This digital activism can shape public opinion and hold institutions accountable. Social media platforms provide a dynamic space for open dialogue and discourse. Users can engage in discussions, share information, and challenge each other’s perspectives, fostering a culture of critical thinking. This open exchange of ideas contributes to a more informed and enlightened society where individuals can broaden their horizons and develop a nuanced understanding of complex issues. While criticisms of social media abound, it is crucial to recognize its positive impact on connectivity and the amplification of diverse voices. Social media transcends physical and cultural barriers, connecting people across the globe and providing a platform for marginalized voices to be heard. By fostering open dialogue and facilitating the exchange of ideas, social media contributes to a more interconnected and empowered society. Embracing the positive aspects of social media allows us to harness its potential for positive change and collective growth.
  • Clearly Define Your Thesis Statement:   Your thesis statement is the core of your argumentative essay. Clearly articulate your main argument or position on the issue. Avoid vague or general statements.  
  • Provide Strong Supporting Evidence:   Back up your thesis with solid evidence from reliable sources and examples. This can include facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes, or real-life examples. Make sure your evidence is relevant to your argument, as it impacts the overall persuasiveness of your thesis.  
  • Anticipate Counterarguments and Address Them:   Acknowledge and address opposing viewpoints to strengthen credibility. This also shows that you engage critically with the topic rather than presenting a one-sided argument. 

The length of an argumentative essay can vary, but it typically falls within the range of 1,000 to 2,500 words. However, the specific requirements may depend on the guidelines provided.

You might write an argumentative essay when:  1. You want to convince others of the validity of your position.  2. There is a controversial or debatable issue that requires discussion.  3. You need to present evidence and logical reasoning to support your claims.  4. You want to explore and critically analyze different perspectives on a topic. 

Argumentative Essay:  Purpose : An argumentative essay aims to persuade the reader to accept or agree with a specific point of view or argument.  Structure : It follows a clear structure with an introduction, thesis statement, body paragraphs presenting arguments and evidence, counterarguments and refutations, and a conclusion.  Tone : The tone is formal and relies on logical reasoning, evidence, and critical analysis.    Narrative/Descriptive Essay:  Purpose : These aim to tell a story or describe an experience, while a descriptive essay focuses on creating a vivid picture of a person, place, or thing.  Structure : They may have a more flexible structure. They often include an engaging introduction, a well-developed body that builds the story or description, and a conclusion.  Tone : The tone is more personal and expressive to evoke emotions or provide sensory details. 

  • Gladd, J. (2020). Tips for Writing Academic Persuasive Essays.  Write What Matters . 
  • Nimehchisalem, V. (2018). Pyramid of argumentation: Towards an integrated model for teaching and assessing ESL writing.  Language & Communication ,  5 (2), 185-200. 
  • Press, B. (2022).  Argumentative Essays: A Step-by-Step Guide . Broadview Press. 
  • Rieke, R. D., Sillars, M. O., & Peterson, T. R. (2005).  Argumentation and critical decision making . Pearson/Allyn & Bacon. 

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Argumentative Essay Guide

Argumentative Essay Outline

Last updated on: Feb 9, 2023

How to Create a Strong Argumentative Essay Outline?

By: Jared P.

Reviewed By: Jacklyn H.

Published on: Oct 29, 2019

Argumentative Essay Outline

Don’t know how to create a strong outline for a convincing argumentative essay?

The outline for an argumentative essay is similar to other types of essays. These include informative essays, persuasive essays, compare and contrast essays, etc.

The outline for almost all types of essays includes an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. To start writing an impactful argumentative essay , you need a topic broad enough to create a strong argument.

In this article, you will learn how to develop a 5 paragraph argumentative essay outline.

Argumentative Essay Outline

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How to Create an Argumentative Essay Outline?

The standard argumentative essay outline includes the following elements.

Argumentative Essay Introduction

The introduction of your essay is the first thing your reader will see. This is where you provide the reader with the proper background information, educating them about your topic. The reader will decide from the very first sentence if he wants to continue reading your essay further or not.

The opening line of an essay is a hook that sticks the reader to the essay. If the introduction is not interesting, the reader might not continue with the essay.

Here are the key points you should keep in mind while writing the introduction of your argumentative essay.

  • Start With a Hook

Start your introduction with an interesting hook that engages your readers and wants them to stick to your essay. It is not necessary that you have to write an entire paragraph as the hook of your essay.

A single interesting sentence also counts as a hook. You can start your essay with an interesting fact, anecdote, funny story, statistics, or a controversial statement.

The hook you choose depends on the nature of the paper that you’re writing and your audience. Whatever you choose to write, make sure it is catchy to grab the attention of readers.

Check out this article to learn some interesting hook examples and their different types.

  • Explain Your Point of View

Now you have to develop your thoughts related to the topic and explain the significance of the topic to the readers. Explain this part of your essay according to your personal knowledge in a couple of lines in the introductory paragraph.

You can also present the background information on your topic. Making sure that the reader knows what will be discussed throughout the paper. Be careful when sharing information at this stage, as you don’t want to bombard the reader with too much data.

  • Write Down Your Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is the crux of your entire essay written at the end of the introductory paragraph. Write down a strong and clear thesis statement that can be backed by a supportive argument and evidence.

The thesis statement of your essay should explain the main point and purpose of writing your essay.

Your entire essay revolves around the thesis; the body paragraphs present information and evidence to defend your thesis.

Follow the tips mentioned above to write an interesting introduction for your argumentative essay.

It is no surprise that the introduction of any essay holds the most importance. If you start on the wrong foot, the entire essay, along with your hard work, goes in vain.

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Argumentative Essay Introduction Examples

To know more about writing a catchy introduction, review the following argumentative essay introduction examples.

  • After the terrorist attack on World Trade Towers on September 11, 2001, racial profiling was increased. According to the authorities, profiling is the only way to identify terrorists. Some airports started targeting people from a Middle-Eastern background, creating concern about the violation of civil rights. This tactic of screening didn’t seem to work, which made the authorities recommend the use of the National ID card. If every citizen carries his ID card along, it will make the screening process easier. And it will not target individuals based on their looks.
  • Nowadays, students wake up, check their phones, get ready and leave instantly for school or college without any breakfast. Some might believe that having breakfast is not essential to start their day with a healthy meal. Studies have shown that breakfast is the essential meal of your day, especially for students.
  • Most of the public workers around the globe are not given the right to freedom of expression. Not even when they are made to work day and night, violating their working rights. Lack of freedom of expression decreases their morale to perform well at work. Enforcing their right to strike and to speak against such violations will encourage them. Countries all over the world should encourage their workers to go on strike and speak out.

Argumentative Essay Body Paragraphs

The body paragraphs of an argumentative essay hold the following significant components.

  • Counter-argument

Each body paragraph should contain a topic sentence that should then be explained in the paragraph with supporting details.

To present a strong argument, you can separate paragraphs to support or negate the thesis statement.

Present your arguments with supporting evidence to support your claim in one paragraph. Remember that you can’t just state your opinions about a particular issue or subject. To make a strong argument and change people's points of view, you must convince them using strong, authentic facts.

Present the opposing argument in the other paragraph by researching both points of view. Presenting both stances will strengthen the argument created in the essay. Refuting the counterargument will make yours seem more valid.

Another approach can be that first, you can use all the evidence to support your argument. After presenting your side of the argument, you can write a paragraph to refute the opposing side.

There is not a rule that should be applied when it comes to presenting an argument. The choice is yours. Make a decision and go for the method that would be easier for you while presenting your case to the readers.

Just be mindful when collecting the evidence. Only look for credible sources. Let’s look at this example of a claim and its supporting evidence.

Claim:   Closing down fast-food chains can control the number of obese kids in the United States.

Evidence: “A ccording to the analysis of several studies in 2017, it is shown that the percentage of obese kids has increased 11 times from the year 1975. ”

Argumentative Essay Conclusion

The last component of a simple argumentative essay outline in the concluding paragraph. Your conclusion needs to be strong to provide closure to the entire argument presented in your essay.

The goal of a conclusion is to make the readers realize why you picked this topic and how significant it is. Restate your thesis statement and your stance on the topic in conclusion.

A strong conclusion leaves a strong impact on readers. This is the part that your reader will remember once he finishes reading the essay. End your essay with an impactful conclusion so that the audience understands and agrees with your point of view.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Examples

Here are some argumentative essay conclusion examples to further clarify how to write the conclusion.

  • Physical punishment might be an effective way to discipline kids. However, parents should avoid using this method to a maximum extent. We live in a world where there is already enough violence around us. We don’t need any more of it, and that should start from home. Teach your children to be responsible without using violence.
  • Hence, we cannot say that adults are better learners than children. This quality may vary depending on the enthusiasm and motivational level. The learning capability of an individual cannot be generalized according to their age.
  • Sports play an important role in maintaining health. We will have a healthier society if people involve themselves in sports. However, we need to make sure that the sports we are playing are not threatening our lives. They should be challenging yet exciting.

Now you know everything there is about an argumentative essay outline. To make it easier for you, we have an argumentative essay outline sample to guide you through your essay.

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Argumentative Essay Outline Examples

Here, you can find a sample argumentative essay outline pdf that you can follow to craft a perfect argumentative essay. You can also find numerous argumentative essay examples online for help.

To make writing an outline of an argumentative essay easier, we have also attached a worksheet below. Complete it carefully, and you will master the art of argumentative writing.

Argumentative Essay Outline Worksheet

Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Argumentative Essay Outline Ap Lang

Argumentative Essay Outline Middle School

Argumentative Essay Outline High School

Argumentative Essay Outline College

Gun Control Argumentative Essay Outline

Abortion Argumentative Essay Outline

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MLA Argumentative Essay Outline

If you follow this guideline and the argumentative essay outline sample provided above, the writing process will become simpler. You can easily find some interesting and attention-grabbing argumentative essay topics online for a great start. Regardless of the essay topic, you will end up with a high-quality essay if you follow a proper guide.

While following an outline is important for writing argumentative essays, other essential steps must also be followed.

If you still need help, you can always contact a professional essay writer who will help you write a great essay.

At 5StarEssays.com, we can provide you with the best and on-time ‘ write essay for me? ’ help. Reach out to us and get the best essay writing help from experts.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the main goal of an argumentative essay.

The key purpose of writing an argumentative essay is to establish your position and support it with evidence and reasons.

Can you start an argumentative essay with a question?

Yes, you can either start your essay with a thesis statement or a rhetorical question.

How does evidence help an argumentative essay?

In an argumentative essay, evidence could be a fact, documentation, or testimony. It helps in strengthening the claims presented in the essay.

Jared P.

Masters Essay, Literature

Jared P. is a renowned author and writing service provider with over fifteen years of experience in the publishing industry. He has a Ph.D. degree in English Literature and has spent his entire career helping students achieve their academic goals by providing expert writing assistance.

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Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 3 strong argumentative essay examples, analyzed.

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Need to defend your opinion on an issue? Argumentative essays are one of the most popular types of essays you’ll write in school. They combine persuasive arguments with fact-based research, and, when done well, can be powerful tools for making someone agree with your point of view. If you’re struggling to write an argumentative essay or just want to learn more about them, seeing examples can be a big help.

After giving an overview of this type of essay, we provide three argumentative essay examples. After each essay, we explain in-depth how the essay was structured, what worked, and where the essay could be improved. We end with tips for making your own argumentative essay as strong as possible.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is an essay that uses evidence and facts to support the claim it’s making. Its purpose is to persuade the reader to agree with the argument being made.

A good argumentative essay will use facts and evidence to support the argument, rather than just the author’s thoughts and opinions. For example, say you wanted to write an argumentative essay stating that Charleston, SC is a great destination for families. You couldn’t just say that it’s a great place because you took your family there and enjoyed it. For it to be an argumentative essay, you need to have facts and data to support your argument, such as the number of child-friendly attractions in Charleston, special deals you can get with kids, and surveys of people who visited Charleston as a family and enjoyed it. The first argument is based entirely on feelings, whereas the second is based on evidence that can be proven.

The standard five paragraph format is common, but not required, for argumentative essays. These essays typically follow one of two formats: the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model.

  • The Toulmin model is the most common. It begins with an introduction, follows with a thesis/claim, and gives data and evidence to support that claim. This style of essay also includes rebuttals of counterarguments.
  • The Rogerian model analyzes two sides of an argument and reaches a conclusion after weighing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

3 Good Argumentative Essay Examples + Analysis

Below are three examples of argumentative essays, written by yours truly in my school days, as well as analysis of what each did well and where it could be improved.

Argumentative Essay Example 1

Proponents of this idea state that it will save local cities and towns money because libraries are expensive to maintain. They also believe it will encourage more people to read because they won’t have to travel to a library to get a book; they can simply click on what they want to read and read it from wherever they are. They could also access more materials because libraries won’t have to buy physical copies of books; they can simply rent out as many digital copies as they need.

However, it would be a serious mistake to replace libraries with tablets. First, digital books and resources are associated with less learning and more problems than print resources. A study done on tablet vs book reading found that people read 20-30% slower on tablets, retain 20% less information, and understand 10% less of what they read compared to people who read the same information in print. Additionally, staring too long at a screen has been shown to cause numerous health problems, including blurred vision, dizziness, dry eyes, headaches, and eye strain, at much higher instances than reading print does. People who use tablets and mobile devices excessively also have a higher incidence of more serious health issues such as fibromyalgia, shoulder and back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and muscle strain. I know that whenever I read from my e-reader for too long, my eyes begin to feel tired and my neck hurts. We should not add to these problems by giving people, especially young people, more reasons to look at screens.

Second, it is incredibly narrow-minded to assume that the only service libraries offer is book lending. Libraries have a multitude of benefits, and many are only available if the library has a physical location. Some of these benefits include acting as a quiet study space, giving people a way to converse with their neighbors, holding classes on a variety of topics, providing jobs, answering patron questions, and keeping the community connected. One neighborhood found that, after a local library instituted community events such as play times for toddlers and parents, job fairs for teenagers, and meeting spaces for senior citizens, over a third of residents reported feeling more connected to their community. Similarly, a Pew survey conducted in 2015 found that nearly two-thirds of American adults feel that closing their local library would have a major impact on their community. People see libraries as a way to connect with others and get their questions answered, benefits tablets can’t offer nearly as well or as easily.

While replacing libraries with tablets may seem like a simple solution, it would encourage people to spend even more time looking at digital screens, despite the myriad issues surrounding them. It would also end access to many of the benefits of libraries that people have come to rely on. In many areas, libraries are such an important part of the community network that they could never be replaced by a simple object.

The author begins by giving an overview of the counter-argument, then the thesis appears as the first sentence in the third paragraph. The essay then spends the rest of the paper dismantling the counter argument and showing why readers should believe the other side.

What this essay does well:

  • Although it’s a bit unusual to have the thesis appear fairly far into the essay, it works because, once the thesis is stated, the rest of the essay focuses on supporting it since the counter-argument has already been discussed earlier in the paper.
  • This essay includes numerous facts and cites studies to support its case. By having specific data to rely on, the author’s argument is stronger and readers will be more inclined to agree with it.
  • For every argument the other side makes, the author makes sure to refute it and follow up with why her opinion is the stronger one. In order to make a strong argument, it’s important to dismantle the other side, which this essay does this by making the author's view appear stronger.
  • This is a shorter paper, and if it needed to be expanded to meet length requirements, it could include more examples and go more into depth with them, such as by explaining specific cases where people benefited from local libraries.
  • Additionally, while the paper uses lots of data, the author also mentions their own experience with using tablets. This should be removed since argumentative essays focus on facts and data to support an argument, not the author’s own opinion or experiences. Replacing that with more data on health issues associated with screen time would strengthen the essay.
  • Some of the points made aren't completely accurate , particularly the one about digital books being cheaper. It actually often costs a library more money to rent out numerous digital copies of a book compared to buying a single physical copy. Make sure in your own essay you thoroughly research each of the points and rebuttals you make, otherwise you'll look like you don't know the issue that well.

body_argue

Argumentative Essay Example 2

There are multiple drugs available to treat malaria, and many of them work well and save lives, but malaria eradication programs that focus too much on them and not enough on prevention haven’t seen long-term success in Sub-Saharan Africa. A major program to combat malaria was WHO’s Global Malaria Eradication Programme. Started in 1955, it had a goal of eliminating malaria in Africa within the next ten years. Based upon previously successful programs in Brazil and the United States, the program focused mainly on vector control. This included widely distributing chloroquine and spraying large amounts of DDT. More than one billion dollars was spent trying to abolish malaria. However, the program suffered from many problems and in 1969, WHO was forced to admit that the program had not succeeded in eradicating malaria. The number of people in Sub-Saharan Africa who contracted malaria as well as the number of malaria deaths had actually increased over 10% during the time the program was active.

One of the major reasons for the failure of the project was that it set uniform strategies and policies. By failing to consider variations between governments, geography, and infrastructure, the program was not nearly as successful as it could have been. Sub-Saharan Africa has neither the money nor the infrastructure to support such an elaborate program, and it couldn’t be run the way it was meant to. Most African countries don't have the resources to send all their people to doctors and get shots, nor can they afford to clear wetlands or other malaria prone areas. The continent’s spending per person for eradicating malaria was just a quarter of what Brazil spent. Sub-Saharan Africa simply can’t rely on a plan that requires more money, infrastructure, and expertise than they have to spare.

Additionally, the widespread use of chloroquine has created drug resistant parasites which are now plaguing Sub-Saharan Africa. Because chloroquine was used widely but inconsistently, mosquitoes developed resistance, and chloroquine is now nearly completely ineffective in Sub-Saharan Africa, with over 95% of mosquitoes resistant to it. As a result, newer, more expensive drugs need to be used to prevent and treat malaria, which further drives up the cost of malaria treatment for a region that can ill afford it.

Instead of developing plans to treat malaria after the infection has incurred, programs should focus on preventing infection from occurring in the first place. Not only is this plan cheaper and more effective, reducing the number of people who contract malaria also reduces loss of work/school days which can further bring down the productivity of the region.

One of the cheapest and most effective ways of preventing malaria is to implement insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs).  These nets provide a protective barrier around the person or people using them. While untreated bed nets are still helpful, those treated with insecticides are much more useful because they stop mosquitoes from biting people through the nets, and they help reduce mosquito populations in a community, thus helping people who don’t even own bed nets.  Bed nets are also very effective because most mosquito bites occur while the person is sleeping, so bed nets would be able to drastically reduce the number of transmissions during the night. In fact, transmission of malaria can be reduced by as much as 90% in areas where the use of ITNs is widespread. Because money is so scarce in Sub-Saharan Africa, the low cost is a great benefit and a major reason why the program is so successful. Bed nets cost roughly 2 USD to make, last several years, and can protect two adults. Studies have shown that, for every 100-1000 more nets are being used, one less child dies of malaria. With an estimated 300 million people in Africa not being protected by mosquito nets, there’s the potential to save three million lives by spending just a few dollars per person.

Reducing the number of people who contract malaria would also reduce poverty levels in Africa significantly, thus improving other aspects of society like education levels and the economy. Vector control is more effective than treatment strategies because it means fewer people are getting sick. When fewer people get sick, the working population is stronger as a whole because people are not put out of work from malaria, nor are they caring for sick relatives. Malaria-afflicted families can typically only harvest 40% of the crops that healthy families can harvest. Additionally, a family with members who have malaria spends roughly a quarter of its income treatment, not including the loss of work they also must deal with due to the illness. It’s estimated that malaria costs Africa 12 billion USD in lost income every year. A strong working population creates a stronger economy, which Sub-Saharan Africa is in desperate need of.  

This essay begins with an introduction, which ends with the thesis (that malaria eradication plans in Sub-Saharan Africa should focus on prevention rather than treatment). The first part of the essay lays out why the counter argument (treatment rather than prevention) is not as effective, and the second part of the essay focuses on why prevention of malaria is the better path to take.

  • The thesis appears early, is stated clearly, and is supported throughout the rest of the essay. This makes the argument clear for readers to understand and follow throughout the essay.
  • There’s lots of solid research in this essay, including specific programs that were conducted and how successful they were, as well as specific data mentioned throughout. This evidence helps strengthen the author’s argument.
  • The author makes a case for using expanding bed net use over waiting until malaria occurs and beginning treatment, but not much of a plan is given for how the bed nets would be distributed or how to ensure they’re being used properly. By going more into detail of what she believes should be done, the author would be making a stronger argument.
  • The introduction of the essay does a good job of laying out the seriousness of the problem, but the conclusion is short and abrupt. Expanding it into its own paragraph would give the author a final way to convince readers of her side of the argument.

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Argumentative Essay Example 3

There are many ways payments could work. They could be in the form of a free-market approach, where athletes are able to earn whatever the market is willing to pay them, it could be a set amount of money per athlete, or student athletes could earn income from endorsements, autographs, and control of their likeness, similar to the way top Olympians earn money.

Proponents of the idea believe that, because college athletes are the ones who are training, participating in games, and bringing in audiences, they should receive some sort of compensation for their work. If there were no college athletes, the NCAA wouldn’t exist, college coaches wouldn’t receive there (sometimes very high) salaries, and brands like Nike couldn’t profit from college sports. In fact, the NCAA brings in roughly $1 billion in revenue a year, but college athletes don’t receive any of that money in the form of a paycheck. Additionally, people who believe college athletes should be paid state that paying college athletes will actually encourage them to remain in college longer and not turn pro as quickly, either by giving them a way to begin earning money in college or requiring them to sign a contract stating they’ll stay at the university for a certain number of years while making an agreed-upon salary.  

Supporters of this idea point to Zion Williamson, the Duke basketball superstar, who, during his freshman year, sustained a serious knee injury. Many argued that, even if he enjoyed playing for Duke, it wasn’t worth risking another injury and ending his professional career before it even began for a program that wasn’t paying him. Williamson seems to have agreed with them and declared his eligibility for the NCAA draft later that year. If he was being paid, he may have stayed at Duke longer. In fact, roughly a third of student athletes surveyed stated that receiving a salary while in college would make them “strongly consider” remaining collegiate athletes longer before turning pro.

Paying athletes could also stop the recruitment scandals that have plagued the NCAA. In 2018, the NCAA stripped the University of Louisville's men's basketball team of its 2013 national championship title because it was discovered coaches were using sex workers to entice recruits to join the team. There have been dozens of other recruitment scandals where college athletes and recruits have been bribed with anything from having their grades changed, to getting free cars, to being straight out bribed. By paying college athletes and putting their salaries out in the open, the NCAA could end the illegal and underhanded ways some schools and coaches try to entice athletes to join.

People who argue against the idea of paying college athletes believe the practice could be disastrous for college sports. By paying athletes, they argue, they’d turn college sports into a bidding war, where only the richest schools could afford top athletes, and the majority of schools would be shut out from developing a talented team (though some argue this already happens because the best players often go to the most established college sports programs, who typically pay their coaches millions of dollars per year). It could also ruin the tight camaraderie of many college teams if players become jealous that certain teammates are making more money than they are.

They also argue that paying college athletes actually means only a small fraction would make significant money. Out of the 350 Division I athletic departments, fewer than a dozen earn any money. Nearly all the money the NCAA makes comes from men’s football and basketball, so paying college athletes would make a small group of men--who likely will be signed to pro teams and begin making millions immediately out of college--rich at the expense of other players.

Those against paying college athletes also believe that the athletes are receiving enough benefits already. The top athletes already receive scholarships that are worth tens of thousands per year, they receive free food/housing/textbooks, have access to top medical care if they are injured, receive top coaching, get travel perks and free gear, and can use their time in college as a way to capture the attention of professional recruiters. No other college students receive anywhere near as much from their schools.

People on this side also point out that, while the NCAA brings in a massive amount of money each year, it is still a non-profit organization. How? Because over 95% of those profits are redistributed to its members’ institutions in the form of scholarships, grants, conferences, support for Division II and Division III teams, and educational programs. Taking away a significant part of that revenue would hurt smaller programs that rely on that money to keep running.

While both sides have good points, it’s clear that the negatives of paying college athletes far outweigh the positives. College athletes spend a significant amount of time and energy playing for their school, but they are compensated for it by the scholarships and perks they receive. Adding a salary to that would result in a college athletic system where only a small handful of athletes (those likely to become millionaires in the professional leagues) are paid by a handful of schools who enter bidding wars to recruit them, while the majority of student athletics and college athletic programs suffer or even shut down for lack of money. Continuing to offer the current level of benefits to student athletes makes it possible for as many people to benefit from and enjoy college sports as possible.

This argumentative essay follows the Rogerian model. It discusses each side, first laying out multiple reasons people believe student athletes should be paid, then discussing reasons why the athletes shouldn’t be paid. It ends by stating that college athletes shouldn’t be paid by arguing that paying them would destroy college athletics programs and cause them to have many of the issues professional sports leagues have.

  • Both sides of the argument are well developed, with multiple reasons why people agree with each side. It allows readers to get a full view of the argument and its nuances.
  • Certain statements on both sides are directly rebuffed in order to show where the strengths and weaknesses of each side lie and give a more complete and sophisticated look at the argument.
  • Using the Rogerian model can be tricky because oftentimes you don’t explicitly state your argument until the end of the paper. Here, the thesis doesn’t appear until the first sentence of the final paragraph. That doesn’t give readers a lot of time to be convinced that your argument is the right one, compared to a paper where the thesis is stated in the beginning and then supported throughout the paper. This paper could be strengthened if the final paragraph was expanded to more fully explain why the author supports the view, or if the paper had made it clearer that paying athletes was the weaker argument throughout.

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3 Tips for Writing a Good Argumentative Essay

Now that you’ve seen examples of what good argumentative essay samples look like, follow these three tips when crafting your own essay.

#1: Make Your Thesis Crystal Clear

The thesis is the key to your argumentative essay; if it isn’t clear or readers can’t find it easily, your entire essay will be weak as a result. Always make sure that your thesis statement is easy to find. The typical spot for it is the final sentence of the introduction paragraph, but if it doesn’t fit in that spot for your essay, try to at least put it as the first or last sentence of a different paragraph so it stands out more.

Also make sure that your thesis makes clear what side of the argument you’re on. After you’ve written it, it’s a great idea to show your thesis to a couple different people--classmates are great for this. Just by reading your thesis they should be able to understand what point you’ll be trying to make with the rest of your essay.

#2: Show Why the Other Side Is Weak

When writing your essay, you may be tempted to ignore the other side of the argument and just focus on your side, but don’t do this. The best argumentative essays really tear apart the other side to show why readers shouldn’t believe it. Before you begin writing your essay, research what the other side believes, and what their strongest points are. Then, in your essay, be sure to mention each of these and use evidence to explain why they’re incorrect/weak arguments. That’ll make your essay much more effective than if you only focused on your side of the argument.

#3: Use Evidence to Support Your Side

Remember, an essay can’t be an argumentative essay if it doesn’t support its argument with evidence. For every point you make, make sure you have facts to back it up. Some examples are previous studies done on the topic, surveys of large groups of people, data points, etc. There should be lots of numbers in your argumentative essay that support your side of the argument. This will make your essay much stronger compared to only relying on your own opinions to support your argument.

Summary: Argumentative Essay Sample

Argumentative essays are persuasive essays that use facts and evidence to support their side of the argument. Most argumentative essays follow either the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model. By reading good argumentative essay examples, you can learn how to develop your essay and provide enough support to make readers agree with your opinion. When writing your essay, remember to always make your thesis clear, show where the other side is weak, and back up your opinion with data and evidence.

What's Next?

Do you need to write an argumentative essay as well?  Check out our guide on the best argumentative essay topics for ideas!

You'll probably also need to write research papers for school.  We've got you covered with 113 potential topics for research papers.

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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Argumentative Essay

Argumentative Essay

It may be a little bit confusing writing an argumentative essay especially if it is for academic purposes. You should be loaded with facts or verified information to prove your point. Every argument needs an interesting topic for you to keep going with your entire work.

What is an Argumentative Essay? An argumentative essay is a type of writing that presents a clear argument or position on a specific topic, supported by evidence and reasoning. The goal is to persuade the reader to understand and perhaps agree with the writer’s point of view. This essay typically includes a clear thesis statement, structured arguments, factual evidence, and a rebuttal to opposing viewpoints. The effectiveness of an argumentative essay lies in its ability to logically and coherently argue a point, while addressing and countering potential counterarguments.

Format/Structure of Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay typically follows a clear and structured format to present and support an argument effectively. Here’s a breakdown of its essential components:

Introduction

Hook : Begin with a compelling statement, question, or fact to grab the reader’s attention. Background Information : Provide context or background necessary to understand the topic or argument. Thesis Statement : Clearly state your main argument or position on the topic. This should be precise, debatable, and convey the essence of your essay.

Body Paragraphs

Paragraph 1 : Start with your strongest point or most convincing argument. Provide evidence (facts, statistics, studies, quotes) to support it. Paragraph 2 and Beyond : Continue with subsequent arguments, each in its own paragraph. Ensure each point logically follows the previous one and adds weight to your overall argument. Counterargument : Address a potential counterargument to your thesis, then refute it with logic, evidence, or both. This shows you’ve considered multiple viewpoints.
Restate Thesis : Reaffirm your thesis statement, but in different words. Summarize Key Points : Briefly recap the main arguments you presented. Call to Action or Final Thought : End with a thought-provoking statement, question, or call to action that encourages further thinking or action on the topic.

The Best Example of Argumentative Essay

Title: The Necessity of Environmental Conservation Introduction The planet’s environmental health is a concern that affects all of humanity. Despite differing opinions, the need for environmental conservation is imperative for the following reasons: the survival of future generations, the balance of ecosystems, and the preservation of natural beauty. Thesis Statement Environmental conservation is not just a moral duty but a necessary action for the survival and prosperity of our planet and future generations. Body Paragraph 1: Survival of Future Generations Firstly, conserving the environment ensures the survival of future generations. Practices such as reducing carbon emissions and protecting natural habitats are crucial. For instance, reducing carbon emissions minimizes the greenhouse effect, directly impacting global warming and climate change. Body Paragraph 2: Balance of Ecosystems Secondly, the conservation of the environment is essential for maintaining the balance of ecosystems. Human activities have led to the extinction of numerous species. Preserving natural habitats helps maintain biodiversity, which is vital for ecological balance, as emphasized in a study by the World Wildlife Fund. Body Paragraph 3: Preservation of Natural Beauty Lastly, environmental conservation is important for preserving the natural beauty of the planet. Natural landscapes like forests, oceans, and mountains not only have aesthetic value but also contribute to human well-being, as suggested by numerous psychological studies. Counterargument and Rebuttal Some argue that economic development should take precedence over environmental conservation. However, sustainable development models show that economic growth does not have to be at the environment’s expense. Green technologies and eco-friendly practices can lead to economic prosperity while preserving the environment. Conclusion In conclusion, environmental conservation is a critical necessity. It ensures the survival of future generations, maintains ecological balance, and preserves the planet’s intrinsic beauty. The path towards sustainable development is not only possible but essential, aligning economic growth with environmental stewardship.

Argumentative Essay Topics with Samples

  • The Impact of Social Media on Mental Health
  • Should Vaccinations be Mandatory for Public Health?
  • The Role of Artificial Intelligence in the Future of Work
  • Climate Change: Myth or Reality?
  • The Ethics of Genetic Editing in Humans
  • Universal Basic Income: Solution to Economic Inequality?
  • The Influence of Video Games on Youth Behavior
  • Animal Testing: Necessary Evil or Outdated Practice?
  • Is Remote Learning Effective in Education?
  • The Debate on Gun Control Laws in the United States
  • The Pros and Cons of Capital Punishment
  • Privacy vs. Security in the Age of Surveillance
  • The Cultural Impact of Globalization
  • Vegetarianism and Veganism: Dietary Choice or Moral Obligation?
  • The Rise of Cryptocurrencies: Future of Finance or Speculative Bubble?

Types of Argumentative Essay and How to Use Them?

Argumentative essays can be categorized into different types based on the approach and purpose of the argument. Understanding these types helps in crafting a more effective and targeted essay:

Classical (Aristotelian) Argumentative Essay

Rooted in the principles of Aristotle, this type of essay presents a clear, direct argument. It starts with an introduction of the topic, followed by the presentation of the writer’s position. The body provides logical reasoning and evidence supporting the argument, and it addresses and refutes counterarguments. The conclusion reinforces the thesis and sums up the argument.

Use this style for topics that can be argued logically and objectively. It’s effective in academic writing and debates where clear, rational arguments are needed.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay

This approach, based on the psychology of Carl Rogers, emphasizes understanding and finding common ground with the opposing viewpoint. Instead of outright refuting the opposing views, the writer acknowledges their validity and seeks a compromise or integrative solution.

Ideal for contentious or polarizing topics where bridging opposing views is important. It’s useful in emotionally charged debates where acknowledging different perspectives can lead to a more balanced conclusion.

Toulmin Argumentative Essay

Developed by Stephen Toulmin, this model focuses on constructing a clear and logical argument. It consists of six elements: claim, grounds (evidence), warrant (link between the claim and evidence), backing (support for the warrant), qualifier (limits of the claim), and rebuttal (addressing counterarguments).

Employ this method for complex arguments that require detailed analysis. It’s suitable for scientific or technical discussions where each aspect of the argument must be logically validated.

Persuasive Argumentative Essay

This type aims to persuade the audience to the writer’s point of view through emotional appeal and moral reasoning. It uses strong, emotive language and persuasive techniques like anecdotes, rhetorical questions, and sometimes, dramatic illustrations to sway the reader’s opinion.

Best for topics related to personal beliefs, values, or when the goal is to influence public opinion. Effective in speeches, advertising, and situations where emotional impact is crucial.

9+ Argumentative Essay Outline Examples

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10. Printable Argumentative Essay Outline

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Elements of an Argumentative Essay

Introduction  .

this is the first part of your paper where you are going to talk about a certain issue in a way that you can grab the attention of your audience.

In your introduction, you should provide an opening line that will keep your readers stuck into your work until the end.

this is the summary of your main idea supported by evidences

This is located at the end of your first paragraph. Every point you take in your argumentative essay must be related to the thesis statement that you wrote.

these were also referred to as “claims”. This is all about the data and facts that you use to prove your point.

Justification  

this justifies or explains your evidence. In your argumentative essay, you have to provide at least three paragraphs of supporting details that backs up your evidence.

Opposing argument  

this is also called “refutation” that proves your opinion may not be true. Unlike any other essays like in a persuasive essay, an argumentative essay will let you see through the other side of the matter. Your work will appear stronger since it will be weighing two different stands whether which argument is more believable.

Conclusion  

this is the summary of your entire argument including your main idea and the evidence. Always take note that you have to provide a concise conclusion.

You may want to check an example of a good argumentative essay below.

“The first objection last week came from the National Organization for Women and the New York Civil Liberties Union, both of which opposed the opening of TYWLS in the fall of 1996. The two groups continue to insist – as though it were 1896 and they were arguing Plessy V. Ferguson – that separate can never be equal. I appreciate NOW’s wariness of the Bush administration’s endorsement of single-sex public schools, since I am of the generation that still considers the label “feminist” to be a compliment – and many feminist still fear that any public acknowledgement of differences between the sexes will hinder their fight for equality.” – Boys Here, Girls There: Sure, If Equality’s the Goal (by Karen Stabiner) “We’ve become accustomed to a new way of being “alone together.” Technology-enabled, we are able to be with one another, and also elsewhere, connected to wherever we want to be. We want to customize our lives. We want to move in and out of where we are because the thing we value most is control over where we focus our attention. We have gotten used to the idea of being in a tribe of one, loyal to our own party.” – The Flight from Conversation (by Sherry Turkle)

What makes a good argumentative essay?

A good argumentative essay has focuses on facts rather than opinions and clear evidence that supports your claim.

How long is an argumentative essay?

It depends on how long your introduction, supporting facts and conclusion is.

Do I still need to provide a reference in my argumentative essay?

Every type of writing must have a reference page.

Argumentative essays must be supplied with strong arguments to convince the readers more about a debatable issue. It should contain elements such as introduction, thesis, evidence, justification, opposing argument and conclusion.

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Argumentative Essay Outline: Writing Steps & Examples

Argumentative Essay Outline

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An argumentative essay outline is a roadmap for the writer to organize their thoughts, research, and arguments in a clear and logical way. It helps to stay focused on the topic and effectively present arguments. Creating an outline before writing an argumentative essay allows students to identify the key points and evidence that should back up ideas.

Struggling with an argumentative essay outline? Stuck at the beginning or not sure which format to take? It’s okay, you’ll find some explanations and pieces of advice here, as well as an argument outline template you could use. We’ve collected everything you need to know before composing an outline for your top-notch argumentative paper. This page contains information about:

  • The notion of outline and why it is important
  • Specifics of sketching an essay where you defend your position
  • Argument essay layout
  • Several useful tips and examples.

Ready to receive some help with your work? Let’s get you prepared to write an excellent essay!

What Is an Argumentative Essay Outline?

Before starting to work on an argumentative paper outline, it is important to understand its definition and purpose. So, what is the outline for an argumentative essay? Outline for an argumentative essay involves defending one’s position on a certain topic by using logic and factual evidence. It requires doing preliminary research and presenting your findings in sketch form. An argumentative essay outline forms the essay’s basic structure and contains its main elements, briefly described and connected together using logical transitions. Once you finish and review this short version, it will be much easier to spot mistakes and logical gaps. After correcting them, you’ll be one step away from writing a high-quality essay.

Argumentative Essay Outline Format

Setting a correct format for argumentative essay outline is important, as it ensures that the entire composition will be properly organized. This is where you create the logical structure, which can be checked for gaps and mistakes before writing the complete text. A simple argumentative essay outline should be composed like this:

  • Introduction This part contains your main topic description and your thesis statement. The latter should be provided fully, while the other descriptions can be sketchy at this stage. Try using some kind of a ‘hook’ to engage your readers.
  • Body paragraphs It is where you briefly introduce your arguments, as well as counterarguments you aim to refute. Mention your evidence and include your sources, but don’t be too wordy, as this is just a sketch for now.
  • Conclusion It should briefly summarize the argumentation and how it supports your thesis.

More examples of an argumentative essay structure outline are available in our downloadable materials.

Learn more: How to Write an Argumentative Essay Introduction

Types of an Argumentative Essay Outline

Before learning how to write an outline for an argumentative essay, you must figure out which type is best for your specific topic. This information might be specified in your assignment, otherwise, it is up to you. The layout of an argumentative essay you’re writing depends on the persuasive approach you’ve chosen. There are three main types:

  • Classical, also known as Aristotelian

Now let's talk about each argument essay outline type in detail. We’ll show you what the differences between them are and when it is better to choose one or another.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline

Let’s start with the classical argument outline. It is also named Aristotelian, honoring the memory of the ancient Greek philosopher who perfected the logical method of presenting argumentation. The general structure should follow a 5 paragraph essay format . Here is how you should compose your outline of an argumentative essay when using this structure type:

  • Explain your thesis, making it clear
  • Mention the opposing thesis if there is one
  • List your arguments, referring to evidence you have collected
  • Mention counterarguments, providing evidence that contradicts them
  • Summarize it, showing that your thesis has been proven by your arguments.

This type is used for direct discussions and straightforward topics.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline

In a Rogerian outline for an argumentative essay, you are expected to pay more attention to the opposing viewpoints, considering the strong and weak sides of both. In this case, the paper focuses not on refuting antagonistic argumentation but rather on finding some middle ground. This argumentative essay layout can be used when you’re aiming to help two opposing sides reach a mutual agreement at a certain point. Another situation when you should consider such an approach is when addressing an audience hostile to your viewpoint – for example, when arguing against the rules or habits of a specific group.

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline

When your topic needs some complicated analysis on different levels, use the Toulmin outline of an argumentative essay. This model is based on six main elements:

  • Claim – your central statement
  • Grounds – evidence backing the claim
  • Warrant – logical connection between the grounds and the claim
  • Backings – additional arguments strengthening the warrant
  • Qualifier – the measure of certainty in the claim
  • Rebuttal – refutes possible counterarguments to the claim.

This format of argumentative essay outline should be used for refuting existing argumentation against your own claim. If you are struggling with outlining your argumentative essay, re-check its main points. Correcting mistakes early on saves hundreds of working hours. To save even more, consider to buy college essays from professional academic writers. 

Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Have you picked your paper format? If yes, you should be ready to proceed. Need an argumentative outline template? If you still hesitate and search for extra hints, it's fine – there are plenty of them on this page! We’ve prepared a comprehensive argument essay outline template for each of the main types described in the previous section. You can find them below.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline Template

If your task is to simply present your point of view on a certain subject and back it up with solid facts, you need a classical argument essay outline. This is the most common and straightforward type of structuring your argumentation, so it can be freely used unless your situation requires a different approach. Here is our outline for argumentative essay example:

  • Intriguing description or some wordplay to ‘hook’ your audience
  • Brief context of the problem
  • Your full thesis statement together with an extra explanation if necessary
  • Data set #1
  • Data set #2, etc.
  • Your argument #2: Formatted the same way as the previous one
  • Point out its logical flaws or provide the evidence that refutes it (or refutatio).
  • Briefly mention how this analysis results in reinforcing your own position.
  • Counterargument #2: This and further ones should be formatted in exactly the same way
  • Summarize your argumentation without repeating it and show how it supports your thesis (this part is also known as peroratio).
  • Add some final notes or a call to action to engage your audience.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline Template

When attempting to counter a formidable position, you need to pay great attention to opposing claims. You might want to find some common ground and reach an agreement with the opposing side, and that is what the Rogerian type is meant for. Follow this argument essay template for conducting an extra analysis of conflicting viewpoints:

  • Describe the problem and add brief context if necessary.
  • Explain your own viewpoint on it as well as opposing stances. You might pick the most well-known of them or the one which shares enough common ground with your position if that helps. Highlight this common ground.
  • Give your thesis statement in a full sentence.
  • Explore the evidence which supports it.
  • Analyze the strength of this position, given the quality of evidence. See if it can be refuted.
  • Mention other positions, if any. Follow the same format as used for the first one.
  • Explain that you understand the opposing position and the reasons behind it.
  • Highlight specific details or areas where you have common ground with the opponent.
  • Your argument #1: explain how it is related to your thesis and provide the supporting evidence.
  • Your argument #1: present it in the same format as the 1st one. The same goes for all other arguments.
  • Point out the elements of both positions which you and your opponent could agree upon.
  • Develop a compromising solution that would encompass these agreeable elements from both sides.
  • Summarize the compromise and the arguments from both sides which back it.
  • Explain how both sides could benefit from agreeing upon this common ground position.

Check below for more argumentative essay outline examples.

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline Template

This argument template for an essay will be useful in case of facing complicated argumentation, which should be properly analyzed. The Toulmin format outline argumentative essay example is here:

  • Come up with something interesting to ‘hook’ your audience.
  • Provide a brief context of the problem.
  • Give your full thesis statement.
  • Evidence #1, including the logical connection between it and your claim
  • Evidence #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Briefly show how it supports your thesis.
  • Show which of your evidence elements backs this warrant.
  • Provide qualifiers for your argumentation: be open and show its weak sides.
  • Your warrant #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Analyze their claim, evaluating its warrants and qualifiers.
  • Provide your rebuttal.
  • Opposing viewpoint #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Briefly summarize your warrants.
  • Summarize the opposing viewpoints, mentioning how you have refuted them.
  • Show that your thesis is supported better.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline Step-By-Step

Let’s put together all the tips on how to write an argumentative essay outline . This section contains a quick guide that could serve as your argumentative essay planning sheet. Make sure to follow this recommended course when composing an academic paper:

  • Think it through Making an argumentative writing outline efficient and persuasive requires good knowledge of the selected topic. So, choose one you are familiar with. You must be able to explain your position well and defend it successfully. And don’t pick an easy one. It should be interesting enough for your audience to get engaged.
  • Do your research Gather key information about your problem before writing an argumentative essay outline. Check if you have enough evidence to back your claim and refute possible counterarguments. Verify that it clearly shows what you actually need and doesn’t prove an opposing position.
  • Pick a format Given the specifics of the chosen problem, find out which approach will suit you best: Classical, Rogerian, or Toulmin. If you start creating your argumentative essay outline in one format and then realize that you need to switch to another, you might lose a lot of time. Too risky for those who have tight deadlines!
  • Structure it properly Follow the recommended templates and put every argument outline into a separate paragraph. The same applies to introductory sections. Remember that proper formatting increases your essay’s readability and thus serves your cause.
  • Keep it concise Make it brief but understandable, ensuring that all key points and data are mentioned. Remember that you just need to outline an argumentative essay, not write the full text. Besides, writing briefly saves you some precious time.
  • Review and correct Spend some time going through your argumentative research essay outline and check carefully for errors or gaps. Read it to yourself or ask someone else to give it as much critique as possible. If you miss something important now, it will be more difficult to find and correct this mistake later.

These tips should be enough for creating an argumentative essay outline for high school and college. You can check how to write an argumentative essay in one of our guides. But also check the samples we've collected for you – maybe you’ll get some extra ideas for your own work. 

Argumentative Essay Outline Examples

Searching for a real argumentative outline example? We’ve collected several outlines for essays addressing popular questions. Check them out, and hopefully, you’ll draw some inspiration from them, which will help you with your own work. Just don’t copy any of that content, as it would mean plagiarism. Don’t forget about the downloadable argumentative essay outline sample. Scroll down, and you’ll find it. Death Penalty Argument Outline Example

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Death Penalty

Sample Outline for Argumentative Essay on Abortion

Sample of Argumentative Essay Outline on Abortion

Argument Essay Outline Example on Human Trafficking

Example of Argument Essay Outline on Human Trafficking

Sample of Argumentative Essay Outline on Gender Equality

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Gender Equality

Argumentative Essay Outline Example on Bullying

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Bullying

Browse StudyCrumb’s Blog to find complete argumentative essay examples formatted accordingly.

Argumentative Paper Outline Checklist

Here’s also a brief list of what should be written in an outline for an argument:

  • checkbox My thesis statement is full and clear.
  • checkbox I provided the necessary context of the selected problem.
  • checkbox I considered the ‘hook’ in order to engage your audience.
  • checkbox Main arguments that support the thesis are logically connected to each other.
  • checkbox I selected solid evidence backing the arguments.
  • checkbox I planned the main counterarguments , together with their rebuttal based on facts and logic.
  • checkbox My conclusion is going to summarize the strength of my position compared to opposing ones.
  • checkbox My argument writing template includes a strong call to action and gives some food for thought.

Bottom Line on Argumentative Essay Outline

We have shown in detail how to outline an argumentative essay and what are main structure types you could use for it, namely:

We have also listed what should an outline for an argumentative essay include, particularly:

  • Introduction with context and a ‘hook’
  • Thesis statement
  • Arguments with supporting evidence
  • Counterarguments with their rebuttal
  • Conclusion.

An argumentative writing template has also been provided. We believe that this information will help you complete an excellent paper on any argumentative essay topic .  If you are still unsure about your writing skills, StudyCrumb got you covered. Remember this phrase — " write an argumentative essay for me ." It's a secret pass to tell our Support reps. Say it, and the magic will happen.

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FAQ About Argumentative Essay Outline

1. why is it important to create an argumentative essay outline.

Writing an argument essay outline helps to form its layout and properly place the main elements: thesis, background, arguments, evidence, and conclusion. It serves as an argumentative essay plan with logical transitions between the key elements. Now you can read this draft version again and spot any inconsistencies before composing the full-text version. That is a much easier task.

3. What should be included in the outline for an argument?

Your argument outline needs to include the following:

  • Analysis of certain aspects of the problem which you could use to clearly maintain your point
  • Logic and reasoning to defend your position using your debate skills
  • Solid evidence retrieved from credible sources to back your claim
  • Visible connection to your thesis and your other arguments, otherwise, your audience might have an issue with understanding your essay.

2. What should include a strong outline for an argumentative essay?

A strong outline for an argumentative essay should include:

  • Strong thesis, preferably about an interesting and controversial problem
  • Proper arguments backed by logic and solid evidence
  • Credible sources you can obtain the evidence from
  • Proper rebuttal for counterarguments, pointing at their weak sides
  • Logical connection between all parts of your outline
  • Conclusion, which summarizes all arguments and rebuttals, showing that your thesis is maintained.

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argumentative essay

The Ultimate Guide On Argumentative Essay

argumentative essay outline examples

Composing an argumentative essay requires thorough preparation and planning. You might be writing essays your whole life; however, with this kind of paper, you need to prove that your claims are correct while applying strong evidence. So, let's find out what elements you need to incorporate to create a perfect argumentative essay. Then, let our write my essay service professionals show you how to write an argumentative essay step by step.

What Is An Argumentative Essay

Let's first address the elephant in the room - 'what is an argumentative essay?'. An argumentative essay definition is a common academic assignment requiring a student to discuss a controversial view or idea. Such an essay differs from expository and analytical pieces because it requires its author to take a stance and prove that their point of view is correct. It is not a piece of cake as a person needs to apply critical thinking skills, use persuasive techniques, and be able to refute opposing opinions to create a successful essay. 

Types of Arguments

Traditionally, we distinguish three types of arguments: the Toulmin argument, the Rogerian argument, and the Aristotelian argument. They help to organize an essay and persuade a reader in the veracity of your words. 

  • The Toulmin argument

This argument type is based on the statement of opinion, which is grounded on solid facts and data from reliable sources. The author should link their claims to the grounds and provide additional support. It allows introducing an opposing thought and providing a counter-argument, using a 'rebuttal.' 

  • The Rogerian argument

The Rogerian argument allows recognizing the existence of opposing opinions before you introduce your own claim. This type of argument aims to find a compromise between the two sides. Thus, the author should work towards a balanced view discussing any controversial issue. 

  • The Aristotelian argument

Using the Aristotelian argument, you should express your claim and convince the reader that it is true. First, introduce the problem and take a stance. Then, mention the opposing opinion and prove it is wrong, providing undeniable evidence. Again, ethos, pathos, and logos can serve as persuasion tools.

The Aristotelian argument

The Elements of Argumentative Essays

Here are the elements of argumentative essays from an argumentative essay writer :

  • Clear and concise language 
  • Arguable argumentative essays topics
  • Thorough research of a controversial issue
  • The organized structure of an argumentative essay
  • Persuasive techniques 
  • Logical argument
  • Effective transitions between paragraphs
  • Strong evidence and reason

argumentative essay outline examples

Argumentative Essay Format

Proper structure is the foundation of a successful paper. You need to understand the argumentative essay structure before formulating your arguments. So, how to organize a good argumentative essay? Our paper writing service writers recommend starting with a compelling introduction, adding 3-4 purposeful body paragraphs, and creating a reasonable conclusion. Take a close look at the argumentative essay format.

Argumentative Essay Topics

If you are wondering what the main key to writing a brilliant argumentative essay is, it's worth saying that overall success depends on many factors. From the sources you find how to structure your work, the choice of words and plagiarism score - every tiny detail matters when the professor starts grading your paper. But it all starts with the choice of a topic.

Your argumentative essay topic is the key to success. And while this is a vital step on your way to a perfectly written essay, there is no need to sugarcoat it - choosing good argumentative topics can be rather hard.

Good argumentative essay topics should be debatable, relevant, relatable, and compelling. Also, argument topics should not be too broad or, on the contrary, too narrow but have to give you enough scope for research and developing your ideas in a short essay. And, most importantly, it has to be interesting to you because only this way can you handle the task well and without a hassle.

If you've been looking for worthy argument essay topics, below you will find a list of 50 great argumentative essay ideas to spark your creativity and inspiration! 

Technology Topics

  • Is social media addiction real?
  • Does technology make us smarter or dumber?
  • The danger of cell phones.
  • Should online content be censored?
  • Kids should not use technology
  • Will virtual money replace real money?
  • Pros and cons of technology in households.
  • Do social networks make us feel lonely?
  • Can people continue developing without technology?
  • Are paper books better than e-books?

Religious Topics

  • Do all religions worship the same God?
  • The role of the church in the modern society.
  • Should religion be taught at schools?
  • Religion vs. Science.
  • Why do people lose faith?
  • The change of religion as a sin.
  • Is God a well-thought-out myth or reality?
  • The purpose of religion.
  • Can one have faith but ignore the church?
  • The issue of atheism.

Political Topics

  • Are wars politically advantageous?
  • Presidential vs. Parliamentary state structure.
  • Are revolutions a good thing?
  • The problem of corruption.
  • What are the advantages and drawbacks of democracy?
  • Stricter gun control is a necessity.
  • Is American foreign policy effective?
  • The political party I support (why?).
  • Should there be a wall on the US border?
  • The importance of having nuclear weapons for countries.

Education Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Should schools stop giving homework?
  • The pros and cons of uniforms.
  • Is cheating a problem today?
  • The points for the elimination of standardized testing.
  • Is the standard grading system already outdated?
  • Students should grade teachers too.
  • Are textbooks a thing of the past?
  • Pros and cons of tech classrooms.
  • Is higher education still a thing today?
  • Single-sex vs. mixed classrooms.

History Topics

  • Should everyone know history?
  • Pros and cons of colonialism.
  • How did WWII create new professions?
  • Reasons for the Mexican-American war.
  • How did minority civil rights change through US history?
  • The role of wars in global progress.
  • What led to the expansion of women’s rights?
  • Major triggers for global conflicts.
  • Why did slavery exist?
  • The results of the American Civil War.

Argumentative Essay Outline

Just like other 5-paragraph essays, an argumentative essay outline should have an introduction, body paragraphs (for arguments and counter-arguments), and a conclusion. You should carefully organize and structure your persuasive essay. It will help the reader to understand your point. Your argument and reasoning must be evident and clear.

Introduction

If you feel intimidated by a blank page and do not know how to start an argumentative essay introduction, pause and think about your argument. First, you should clearly understand what you are going to write about. Determine why you are interested in the topic and why it is relevant to society in general. 

The introductory paragraph does not have to be long. You need only 3-5 sentences to introduce the topic. Start with a hook that will catch the reader's attention. You may use a quotation, provide statistics, or address the audience directly by asking a question. 

For example:

  • Nelson Mandela once said, ' the greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.'
  • The Inter-Parliamentary Union reports that only 17% of government ministers are female. 
  • Are people morally obliged to save the planet? 

Then, provide general information about the topic and outline the context within which you will discuss it. Finally, create a thoughtful thesis statement as the last sentence of the introductory paragraph. 

Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is one of the most important elements of an argumentative essay. It should be formulated to make it arguable, allowing the reader to support it or disagree. A thesis statement reflects the main claim of the paper. It should be precise and give the reader a hint about the author's position and findings. For an argumentative essay, you can either state your main point or mention the opposing view and refute it immediately. Remember that each body paragraph should support your argumentative essay thesis statement and provide claims with adequate reasoning.  

good statement

Argumentative Essay Body Paragraphs

A typical body of an argumentative essay usually includes 3-4 paragraphs. Each must focus on one particular claim connected with the thesis statement. Make sure you provide your reasoning for each idea. You can use proven facts, statistical data, examples, and professional quotations to make your argument look trustworthy. 

Each paragraph of the main body requires the following format:

  • Topic sentence with a claim that backs up the thesis statement
  • Evidence 1 that supports the first sentence with reasoning
  • Evidence 2 that supports the first sentence with reasoning
  • Evidence 3 that supports the first sentence with reasoning
  • Concluding sentence

However, the last body paragraph has a slightly different format. Here you should address the claims of your opponents and prove them wrong. It allows you to discuss the problem from various perspectives and make your writing look more reliable to the reader. This paragraph includes the following:

  • Opposing view with its description
  • Refutation of the opponents' claims

Conclusion of Argumentative Essay Outline

A good concluding paragraph will reinforce your arguments. Ideally, it should summarize your claims and motivate the audience to research the topic further. Do not add any new information; restate your argument so that your audience knows what is most important in your writing. It would be a good idea to appeal to your readers' emotions and include your personal experience.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay?

You must be wondering: what are the steps in writing an argumentative essay if you study in one of the top colleges for astrophysics ? The writing process can be generally divided into six smaller chunks of work. Let us look at them more closely.

write an argumentative essay

Come Up with an Idea

To find a suitable topic for your argumentative essay, you should find a controversial issue you care about. Then, you can practice brainstorming to gather your thoughts about it. It would be a good idea to create a mind map, diagram, or list the ideas that come up in your mind. Then, when they are written down, it will be easy to sort them and form claims on their basis. Besides, you can use such preparation to create an argumentative essay outline. 

Gather Evidence 

You need to find solid evidence to ensure that your viewpoint is correct and to persuade the audience of the credibility of your words. Research the topic of your choice and choose the facts, statistics, and quotes you can potentially use in the paper. Focus only on reliable sources, such as books, scholarly journals, websites of governmental organizations, etc. You need to find a piece of evidence to support each claim you make and then comment on it. 

Plan and Organize

It is necessary to create an outline of a 5 paragraph essay to make it organized and well-structured. You should use the basic structure we mentioned before as a template and insert your claims and pieces of evidence in it. The plan does not have to be detailed. You just need to write short phrases that will put everything in order. This outline will guide you during the next step, the actual writing process. 

Start Writing an Argumentative Essay

This step is the most responsible one as you need to put together all the information you have found and formulate your argument. Start with an introductory paragraph and think carefully about the thesis statement. It is the basis of your paper, as all the claims from the body must support your thesis statement. 

Do not forget to work on transitions between sentences. The argumentative essay must be smooth to allow you to persuade the audience. The smooth flow of the text, its logical structure, and the use of persuasive techniques will help you get the grade you want. 

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When you are through the writing stage, you need to rest to go back to your argumentative essay with a fresh mind. Read your paper and correct grammar and style mistakes. Do not neglect this stage as, in most cases, the initial draft is imperfect and requires improvements. Your teacher can lower your grade even for spelling and punctuation mistakes. All your efforts will be in vain if you do not proofread the paper.

Even though all the hard work is done by this stage, submitting an argumentative essay may still be intimidating. However, you should not be afraid to get your work graded. It is a great chance to grow as a writer and develop your skills. We are sure that the result will be outstanding if you follow your assignment instructions and our guidelines.

Argumentative Essay Example

Look through this example of an argumentative essay. It is formatted according to the APA style guidelines, but when writing your paper, you should use the citation style required by your teacher: MLA, Harvard, etc.

Higher Education Increases the Chances of Employment

Today the necessity of higher education becomes controversial. Some people refuse to acquire a college degree. They claim it to be an old-fashioned way of learning that only imposes outdated norms, standards, and decision-making patterns on students. On the contrary, there are those who believe that higher education is essential for better employment opportunities as it gives excellent preparation for the future job. Nevertheless, although college education undergoes some critique, it is still useful for building a successful career, seeking employment, and improving promotion chances.

First, university education increases the chances of being successfully employed. Organizations are often looking for people with a formal degree to be sure that these candidates have sufficient knowledge and qualifications for the job. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (2019), students with a bachelor’s degree demonstrate the highest employment rate, which constitutes 86%, in comparison with non-graduates. An academic degree makes people more sustainable as a part of the labor market. In addition, it becomes a decisive factor for occupying certain jobs, for example, at a hospital or research institution. Therefore, higher education enhances employment chances. 

Second, higher education allows students to have more opportunities for personal development, which is useful for improving future promotion chances. According to Kopzhassarova et al. (2016), the curriculum of most educational institutions is built with a focus on independent learning that enhances critical thinking skills. This helps students to learn how to analyze, structure, and interpret information. Moreover, they can become more responsible and improve personal discipline. Thus, education allows students to develop the skills necessary for promotion. 

Finally, college and university graduates are more likely to get the desired job and eventually earn more. As the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2019) claims, the salaries of people with a formal degree tend to be higher than those of non-graduates. Most organizations set higher education as a requirement for their vacancies. This means that employers value people with qualifications and recognize the importance of education. Thus, graduating from a college or university gives a significant advantage for employment and potentially higher salaries. 

Naturally, some people doubt the necessity of higher education. They believe that young people gain experience and soft skills easier through practice. What is more, college or university education is expensive and sometimes not effective. It does not provide enough practice and soft skills training. However, a solid knowledge base students get at educational institutions is undeniable. It allows them to grow as professionals and become competent experts in their subject area. Besides, they can still get practice as most educational programs allow students to participate in the actual working process during internships. Thus, higher education can get the necessary experience in addition to theoretical knowledge. 

To sum up, higher education provides a solid competitive advantage in the long term. It multiplies employment chances for graduates and allows them to earn more. Although universities may not always provide students with all the skills, a diploma is still valued by most employers. Therefore, acquiring higher education is the right way to successful employment.

Kopzhassarova, U., Akbayeva, G., Eskazinova, Z., Belgibayeva, G., & Tazhikeyeva, A. (2016). Enhancement of students’ independent learning through their critical thinking skills development. International Journal of Environmental & Science Education, 11 (18),11585-11585.

National Center for Education Statistics. (2019). Employment rates of college graduates . https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=561

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2019, September 4). Unemployment rates and earnings by educational attainment . https://www.bls.gov/emp/chart-unemployment-earnings-education.htm

Argumentative essays can be rather challenging as you need to present your argument and prove it is the correct viewpoint. It requires critical thinking skills and basic knowledge of argument types. Additionally, the format of an argumentative essay is tricky since in addition to supporting your assertions, you must refute the opposing views. All of these aspects can be successfully handled with the help of proper preparation, an organized writing process, and attentive proofreading. 

With these argumentative essay writing tips, you can be confident while submitting your paper from now on. However, if you need help with your argumentative essay examples, feel free to contact EssayService. In addition, you can find a qualified writer on our argumentative essay writing service to assist you in crafting or editing your paper. This way, you will get the grade you want without extra effort.

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Persuasive Essay Outline – Examples, Templates & Structure

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Amanda Green was born in a small town in the west of Scotland, where everyone knows everyone. I joined the Toastmasters 15 years ago, and I served in nearly every office in the club since then. I love helping others gain confidence and skills they can apply in every day life.

Writing a good persuasive essay can help convince others of a point that means a lot to you. It can be anything from an environmental crisis to something as simple as the importance of ebooks to the modern reader. But how do you write a persuasive essay? Where do you even start? Right here! I’ll explain everything you need to know and even show you an example of a persuasive essay.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

argumentative essay outline examples

Persuasive essays are meant to convince someone or a group of people to agree with you on a certain topic or point of view. As the writer, you’ll use definitive evidence, simple reasoning, and even examples to support your argument and persuade them to understand the point of the essay.

Why Write a Persuasive Essay?

Believe it or not, you’ll have to form convincing arguments throughout real life. This could be in the form of college essays or academic essays, speeches for debate club that requires a valid argument, or even presenting an idea for change to your town council.

Argumentative vs. Persuasive Essay

An argumentative essay presents an argument on a specific topic and tries to persuade people to accept that argument as valid. It uses evidence, logic, and sometimes counterarguments to support the main point.

A persuasive essay is similar but presents an argument and focuses more on appealing to the reader’s emotions and values to convince them of your point of view. Think of it as convincing vs. persuading. And, yes, persuasive essays can also use evidence, but they often rely more on personal anecdotes and moral appeals to plead their case.

Let me give you an example. I’m a content writer, but I’m also a published author. If I were going to write an argumentative essay, I’d probably choose a topic like “Do you think authors should self-edit their work?”

But if I were doing a persuasive essay with a similar angle, the topic would look more like “The benefits of self-editing for authors.” Make sense?

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Basically, the main difference between argumentative and persuasive essays is all in the emphasis placed on logic and emotion.

How Many Paragraphs in a Persuasive Essay?

A decent persuasive essay should be around five or six paragraphs with double line spacing, depending on the topic, and can range from 500-2000 words in length. This includes your introduction and conclusion.

Introduction of a Persuasive Essay Example

Our world is facing a crisis, and that crisis is plastic pollution! Every day, a disgusting amount of plastic waste is just dumped into our oceans, killing and harming innocent marine life and ultimately affecting the entire food chain, including us.

Even though there is a clear and present danger that plastic presents, there are still a lot of people and corporations that continue to use single-use plastics with zero regards for their impact on our environment. It’s time for people to really look around and take some responsibility.

We can make a change by learning and using environmentally friendly alternatives in our everyday lives. So, in this essay, I’ll argue that using reusable bags, water bottles, and containers is not only necessary for the health of our precious planet but also a simple and effective way to make a real difference.

A Persuasive Essay Structure

As persuasive essay writers, you can write it however you like, but to follow a traditional persuasive essay structure, use this basic layout to get an effective paper:

  • An Introduction: You need a good hook to grab the reader’s attention, a thesis statement presenting the main argument, and a roadmap of the essay, so they know what to expect.
  • The Body Paragraphs: 2-3 paragraphs should suffice to provide strong evidence, examples, and any reasoning to support the thesis statement. Each paragraph should focus on a single main idea. 
  • The Counterargument: This section acknowledges and refutes the opposing viewpoint, strengthening your argument but still without being as forward as an argumentative essay.
  • A Conclusion or Closing Statement: Here is where you would summarize the main points of the essay and a restatement of the thesis, including a call to action for the reader and/or a final thought.

In the end, a persuasive essay usually consists of 5-6 paragraphs and needs to be clear, concise, and logically structured to really persuade the reader on the point.

Tips for Persuasive Writing

argumentative essay outline examples

  • Choose a strong, clear thesis statement that presents your argument well.
  • Know your audience and tailor your language and arguments to them. You’ll need a different approach if you’re speaking to a group of teenagers versus a team of adults.
  • Use credible and reliable sources to support your argument so no one can second guess your point.
  • Expect that people will have counterarguments and prepare a few talking points to address them.
  • Use strong pieces of evidence and back them up with facts, statistics, examples, and personal anecdotes. Putting a personal touch on it helps ground the essay and lets people know you’re serious about the topic.
  • Use an emotional appeal to engage the reader and make a personal connection to your argument. Basically, tug at their heartstrings and play into their guilt.
  • Use clear and concise wordage. Try and avoid confusing technical jargon that might confuse people, and maintain a consistent tone throughout the essay.
  • Make sure you’re confident and use an assertive tone but avoid being overly aggressive or confrontational. That will just spark a fight.
  • Finish up with a powerful call to action or a final thought that leaves a lasting impact on the reader or listener.
  • Use the same font throughout your essay, even for headings and titles. Go with easy-to-read fonts like Calibri, Times New Roman, or Garamond.
  • Proofread and edit your essay for clarity, grammar, and style. I cannot stress this one enough. If you’re not confident, use programs like Grammarly to help spot typos and inconsistencies.

Persuasive Essay Topic Ideas

If you’re stuck on some ideas of what to form your essay around, here’s a list of some popular topics to inspire you.

  • Importance of recycling and reducing waste in today’s climate.
  • The need for stricter gun control laws all over the world.
  • A paper on abortion rights in today’s age.
  • Benefits of alternative energy sources over fossil fuels and how we can be using them.
  • How social media has negative impacts on mental health in kids.
  • Key benefits of a vegetarian or vegan diet and how it can help the planet.
  • The value of a college education.
  • Rise of plastic pollution on the environment and sea life and how it is affecting us.
  • Why physical exercise and leading an active lifestyle are important.
  • The dangers of texting while driving.
  • How our public schools need better funding.
  • Benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace both online and in-person.

Any of these could be used as logical arguments. Still, to make a persuasive argument from either of them, just follow the basic persuasive essay outline examples I’ve given you.

Example of a Persuasive Essay

Introduction.

In today’s age of ever-changing technology, the way we consume and experience books have changed dramatically in just a short time. While physical books were once the only option, ebooks have grown increasingly popular in recent years. In my essay, I’ll argue that, while we all still love paperbacks and hardcovers, ebooks offer so many benefits over physical books, making them the number one choice for most readers today.

Body Paragraph 1: Convenience

Ebooks are convenient; there’s just no denying it. They’re easily accessible through devices like smartphones, tablets, and e-readers, and they allow readers to carry hundreds of books with them at all times. This makes them perfect for traveling or heading to work, or even going to the gym. Readers can now have an entire library with them without the added weight of physical books. Plus, ebooks are easily bought online with just the click of a button, further adding to their convenience.

Body Paragraph 2: Customization

Ebooks offer a level of customization that physical books just can’t match. For one, the font size can be adjusted for easier reading, which is great for those who have eyesight problems. The background color can also be changed from light to dark to reduce eye strain. Personally, as someone who suffers from Meniere’s disease, this is a great feature. All of these options make ebooks a great choice for people with visual impairments, neurological disorders, or reading difficulties.

Body Paragraph 3: Affordability

Ebooks are often far cheaper than physical books, especially when purchased in bulk. You can get an entire series for a fraction of the cost of one paperback. This makes them a more accessible option for budget-conscious readers and people who simply don’t have the disposable funds for books. Also, tons of ebooks are available for free, which is a great option for readers that are looking for ways to save money but keep up with their reading habits.

Body Paragraph 4: Environmentally Friendly

626,000 tons of paper is used to produce all the books we see published every year. That’s a scary number when you consider the rate of deforestation and the state of our world in terms of global warming. We simply can’t afford to move ahead at a rate like that. Ebooks help tackle the issue because they require zero trees to produce.

In conclusion, ebooks offer endless benefits over physical books, including convenience, customization, and affordability. While physical books will always hold a special place in our hearts, you have to admit that the benefits of ebooks just can’t be ignored. For modern, busy, on-the-go readers, ebooks are the preferred choice. It’s time to embrace the digital age and make the switch to ebooks.

Now Write Your Persuasive Essay!

I hope this guide has helped you figure out persuasive essay writing and how to put together powerful arguments. Just stick to the facts and ease the reader into your point with gentle arguments that continue to prove your point. Don’t be afraid to get personal if it can help the essay and convince the reader.

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  1. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Learn how to write an argumentative essay with a clear thesis statement, strong evidence, and a clear structure. Find out the common approaches to argumentative essays, such as the Toulmin model and the Rogerian model, and see examples of argumentative essay prompts and introductions.

  2. How to Write an Essay Outline

    Learn how to write an essay outline with guidelines and examples for different types of essays. See how to organize your material, present your argument, and structure your essay with an argumentative, expository, or literary analysis outline template.

  3. How to Form an Argumentative Essay Outline

    Learn how to make an effective argumentative essay outline, covering three major formats: Classical (Aristotelian), Rogerian, and Toulmin. See argumentative essay outline examples and templates for each format and get tips on how to structure your argument.

  4. Argumentative Essay Outline

    Learn how to write an argumentative essay outline with a template and a worksheet. Follow the structure of a classical, Rogerian, or Toulmin argument and get examples of each type. Find out how to introduce your argument, support it with evidence, and refute the counter argument.

  5. Argumentative Essay

    Step 1: Select a topic. Step 2: Identify a position. Step 3: Locate appropriate resources. Step 4: Identify evidence supporting the position. ( NOTE: If there is little evidence in support of the claim, consider re-examining the main argument.) Steps to write an argumentative essay When gathering evidence, use credible sources.

  6. 10+ Argumentative Essay Outline Templates & Formats

    Argumentative Essay Outline Examples How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline? An argumentative essay outline is a plan through which the writer works and organizes the raw data. An outline provides a track to follow for your papers and essays.

  7. How to Create a Powerful Argumentative Essay Outline

    Learn how to create a powerful argumentative essay outline with four main sections: introduction, key arguments, counterarguments and conclusion. See a downloadable skeleton outline and tips for writing each section. Find out how to write a hook sentence, background information, thesis statement, claims, evidence and rebuttal.

  8. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Learn the definition, structure, and strategies of argumentative essays, a type of academic writing that presents a clear argument or a firm position on a contentious issue. See how to write an argumentative essay with an outline, tips, and examples from different subject areas.

  9. How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Easy Step-by-Step Guide

    1. Introductory paragraph. The first paragraph of your essay should outline the topic, provide background information necessary to understand your argument, outline the evidence you will present and states your thesis. 2. The thesis statement. This is part of your first paragraph.

  10. What is an Argumentative Essay? How to Write It (With Examples)

    Learn how to write an argumentative essay with an outline, structure, and types of argument claims. See examples of argumentative essay outlines for different topics and purposes. Find tips and resources for writing a good argumentative essay.

  11. Argumentative Essay Outline: Guidelines, Tips, & Examples

    Argumentative Essay Outline: Guidelines, Tips, & Examples An argumentative essay includes an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Here is a sample argumentative essay outline to help you get started.

  12. Argumentative Essay: Definition, Outline & Examples of ...

    The argumentative essay is one which is used to present an argument surrounding two side of any particular issue. The essay can be written as a way of presenting both sides of the argument as equal or it might be written with one side taking preference over the other. This would be done when the writer has a specific opinion on the topic.

  13. 3 Strong Argumentative Essay Examples, Analyzed

    Argumentative Essay Example 2. Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through female Anopheles mosquitoes. Each year, over half a billion people will become infected with malaria, with roughly 80% of them living in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. PDF Sample Argument Outline

    Sample Argument Outline. The following is a basic outline of an argument essay. Keep in mind that this is only one kind of possible organization; there are several ways to structure an effective argument. Outlines can also vary in the amount of detail. Always check with your instructor if you are unsure about the organization of your essay.

  15. Argumentative Essay

    Toulmin Argumentative Essay. Developed by Stephen Toulmin, this model focuses on constructing a clear and logical argument. It consists of six elements: claim, grounds (evidence), warrant (link between the claim and evidence), backing (support for the warrant), qualifier (limits of the claim), and rebuttal (addressing counterarguments).

  16. 37 Outstanding Essay Outline Templates (Argumentative, Narrative

    37 Outstanding Essay Outline Templates (Argumentative, Narrative, Persuasive) Writing an essay can seem like an overwhelming task, and planning beforehand is essential to success. An essay outline will help you to structure and organize your essay so that it flows coherently.

  17. How to Write an Argumentative Essay (Examples Included)

    Developing an argument requires a significant understanding of the subject matter from all angles. Let's take a look at the steps to writing an argumentative essay: 1. Choose appropriate argumentative essay topics. Although topics for an argumentative essay are highly diverse, they are based on a controversial stance.

  18. Argumentative Essay Outline: Step-By-Step Writing Guide

    The Toulmin format outline argumentative essay example is here: Come up with something interesting to 'hook' your audience. Provide a brief context of the problem. Evidence #1, including the logical connection between it and your claim. Evidence #2, formatted in the same way, etc.

  19. Argumentative Essay Outline Format [12 Best Examples]

    An Argumentative Essay takes a position on an issue and tries to convince the reader that this position is correct whereas an argumentative essay outline gives proper structure to the essay before it is written.. Built on an initial premise, every section in the paper reinforces the declared statement as correct. Ideally, by the time one is at the conclusion, a strong paper will have won over ...

  20. How to Write an Argumentative Essay: Topics, Outline, Example

    Argumentative Essay Outline. Just like other 5-paragraph essays, an argumentative essay outline should have an introduction, body paragraphs (for arguments and counter-arguments), and a conclusion. You should carefully organize and structure your persuasive essay. It will help the reader to understand your point.

  21. PDF Argumentative Essay Outline

    Argumentative Essay Outline (Claim) Directions: Use this outline as a "road map" to write your essay. If you need more examples or sentence starters, use page 2 to help you! 1) Introduction/Claim (One paragraph) • Start with a hook or attention getting sentence. • Briefly summarize the texts • State your claim. Make sure you are ...

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  23. Persuasive Essay Outline

    Still, to make a persuasive argument from either of them, just follow the basic persuasive essay outline examples I've given you. Example of a Persuasive Essay Introduction. In today's age of ever-changing technology, the way we consume and experience books have changed dramatically in just a short time. While physical books were once the ...

  24. Argumentative Essay

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  25. PHI105 T4 Outline Worksheet Persuasive Essay Planning

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  26. Speech Outline Examples for Different Occasions

    This is the essence of a persuasive speech that doesn't just deliver a message but drives it home. Graduation Speech Outline. Crafting a graduation speech outline requires a balance of personal touch and universal appeal. Begin with the intro. Capture attention and express deep thanks. Acknowledge the institution, educators, and fellow ...