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Application Components

A comprehensive and holistic review.

At Yale Law School, our goal is to enroll a talented, diverse, and engaged entering class each fall. Each application is comprehensively and holistically reviewed to ensure that we thoughtfully consider all of the information that you provide to us. No one factor is dispositive. Instead, the Admissions Committee carefully evaluates each component of every application, including your essays, letters of recommendation, extracurricular activities and leadership, honors and awards, professional experiences, and background. We do not utilize a GPA or standardized test score cutoff of any kind in our review process.

Every year applicants from all backgrounds and with scores in all ranges are admitted to Yale Law School. The only guarantee you will not be admitted is if you do not apply, and we take seriously every application we receive.

The below application components were updated as of August 2023.

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Application Fee & Need-Based Fee Waivers

Applications must be accompanied by a non-refundable $85 application fee, which will not be credited to tuition in the event of admission. The application fee is waived automatically for those applicants who have received an LSAC fee waiver.

If you do not have an LSAC fee waiver and would like to request a need-based fee waiver of your Yale Law School application fee, please request a fee waiver using our online application . Need-based fee waivers are generously granted, and parental information is not requested as part of the fee waiver application. If your request is approved, you will be given a fee waiver code to enter during the submission process for your Yale Law School application.

Please note that neither the request for, nor the granting of, a need-based fee waiver has any bearing on admissions decisions. Yale Law School employs a need-blind admissions process and encourages applicants from all socio-economic backgrounds to apply.

Undergraduate Degrees & Academic Transcripts

You must receive, or expect to receive, by the summer of 2024 a bachelor's degree (or the equivalent) from an approved undergraduate institution in order to be eligible to apply. All offers of admission are contingent upon graduation.

You must submit to LSAC transcripts from each college or university you attended, including all schools you attended for graduate or professional study. Even if one school includes summary data regarding courses from another school on its transcript, an official transcript from each institution must be submitted. Yale Law School strongly encourages applicants to submit transcripts, through LSAC, reflecting all coursework completed through the time of application and further encourages applicants to submit updated transcripts as additional coursework is completed. We suggest that you allow at least six weeks for a transcript to be processed by LSAC. For detailed instructions, please visit the LSAC transcript webpage .

In light of the circumstances posed by COVID-19, Yale Law School recognizes that transcripts may reflect mandatory or optional pass/fail or credit/no credit grades. These grades will not be viewed negatively by the Admissions Office and the Law School will maintain a holistic review process for all applications.

Personal Statements

Applicants must submit a personal statement that helps us learn about the personal, professional, and/or academic qualities they would bring to the Law School community and the legal profession. Applicants often submit the personal statement they have prepared for other law school applications.

Personal statements should be approximately two double-spaced pages.

250-Word Essays

The Law School is a vibrant intellectual community where students are expected to engage academically with faculty and fellow students. In no more than 250 words, applicants must write about an idea or issue from their academic, extracurricular, or professional work that is of particular interest to them. The idea or issue you choose does not have to be law-related; this is an opportunity for readers to learn more about how you would engage intellectually in the Law School community.

Optional Essay

Applicants may choose to submit an essay in response to one of the four questions below, each related to a value that is central to the Law School community. This is an opportunity to provide readers with relevant information that may not be found elsewhere in your application. If you choose to answer one of these questions, your essay should focus on your relevant personal, professional, and/or academic experiences and not on specific reasons why you wish to attend Yale Law School.

The optional essay should be approximately one page double-spaced. The prompts for the optional essay are as follows:

  • Option 1: The Law School has a strong tradition of public service and encourages its students to contribute to the community in a wide variety of ways. Describe a community that has been particularly meaningful to you. Discuss what you have gained from being a part of this community and what you have contributed to this community.  
  • Option 2: The Law School encourages its students and alumni to be leaders, innovators, and changemakers across many different sectors. Describe one of your most important accomplishments and explain why it is important to you. Discuss how you demonstrated leadership, helped innovate, and/or drove change as part of that accomplishment.  
  • Option 3: The Law School values determination and resilience and recognizes that these traits are critical to success at the Law School and in the legal profession. Describe a significant challenge, disappointment, or setback that you have faced. Discuss how you approached this experience and what you learned from it.  
  • Option 4: In order to succeed at the Law School and in the legal profession, you must be able to have discussions across difference and be open to changing your mind. Describe a time when you changed your mind on an important topic after discussing it with a person with whom you disagreed or learning additional information. Discuss what you learned from this experience.

Applicants may submit addenda to their application if any are necessary for a full representation of their candidacy. These addenda may include, for example, explanations related to transcripts or test scores, including a history of under-performance on standardized tests. It is not necessary to include any addenda, and many applicants do not include any.

Letters of Recommendation

Yale Law School requires at least two letters of recommendation. We strongly prefer letters from at least two professors with whom you have studied who can speak to your academic performance and who have had a chance to personally evaluate significant aspects of your academic work. Letters from employers, college deans, coaches, chaplains, colleagues, and others may be helpful, but are not preferred. If possible, they should not replace letters from two faculty recommenders.

Applicants who have been out of school for some time or who are otherwise unable to obtain two faculty recommendations may substitute letters from employers or others who know them well. These letters should address the qualities that academic recommendations typically address, for example: the applicant's ability to write and think critically, as well as their overall suitability for the study and practice of law.

A tip sheet for your recommenders can be found  here .

All letters of recommendation must be transmitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service , which is included as part of your CAS subscription.

We will begin review of your application as soon as we have received two letters of recommendation. We will not hold your application in order to wait for additional letters. To ensure that all of your recommendations are available for consideration, please verify that they are on file with LSAC prior to applying to the Law School.

Activities Sections

Applicants are required to submit a statement of activities to help us understand what you did during your undergraduate education and after graduation (if applicable). 

The college activities section asks three questions: 1) what you did during those terms when you were not in school, including summers and any other terms off (e.g., employment, internships, or study abroad); 2) what you did during the terms while you were also taking classes (e.g., extracurricular activities, employment, or internships); and 3) a catch-all question where you may briefly describe any other activities that you consider relevant (e.g., a significant thesis or capstone project, or significant personal or familial responsibilities). While you may choose to do this in a variety of formats, we ask that you do so in a structured manner such as a list or chart.

If it has been more than three months since you attended college, you must also describe what you have been doing since graduation in any format you choose. You should include graduate or professional education, paid or unpaid employment, as well as any other activities that you consider relevant. You may respond in a narrative format if you have only one or two activities. If you have more than a few activities, we ask that you format your response in a structured manner such as a list or chart.

The activities in these sections should be listed in order of their relative importance to you. For each activity, you must provide a brief description, state the approximate start and end dates, estimate the weekly hourly commitment, and note whether the activity was paid or unpaid. Please note that we anticipate significant duplication between these sections and your résumé. These sections should be brief, and, in general, applicants should answer the college activities questions in no more than 1–2 pages and the post-college activities question in no more than one page. 

Standardized Tests

Yale Law School accepts results from the  Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test . Additionally, the Law School accepts results from the  LSAT-Flex and the GRE General Test at Home . We do not have a preference among these standardized tests. However, you may submit score(s) from one standardized test only. If you have a reportable LSAT score, you may not submit a GRE score for consideration.

If you choose to apply with the LSAT, you must take the LSAT no later than January 2024. LSAC automatically reports all LSAT scores from the past five years. The oldest LSAT score we will accept is June 2018. If you have taken the LSAT since June 2018, you do not have the option to not report your score(s) to the Law School—your score(s) will be included in the information that we receive in your CAS report from LSAC.

LSAC requires at least one LSAT writing sample, taken either at the time of the LSAT examination or via LSAT Writing , in order to generate your CAS report. Yale Law School requires only one LSAT writing sample. Applicants who take the LSAT more than once do not need to submit multiple writing samples. It may take up to three weeks for LSAC to process and report your LSAT Writing. Therefore, you should complete your LSAT Writing no later than January 25, 2024 to ensure we receive it by Yale Law School’s application deadline.

If you choose to apply using the GRE General Test, we must receive your GRE scores from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) by our application deadline, February 15, 2024. Because it may take up to 15 calendar days for ETS to transmit your scores once you complete the exam, you should take the GRE no later than February 1, 2024. Applicants who have taken the GRE can log into their ETS accounts and select Yale Law School as a recipient of GRE results using the school code 4542.

To maintain parity between our evaluation of LSAT and GRE results, applicants who apply using the GRE must submit all GRE scores from the past five years. When reporting your GRE scores to Yale Law School, please select the option to report your entire testing history. Selecting this option will report all of your GRE scores for the past five years. Additionally, please ensure that the GRE score report submitted with your application is generated on or after the date you submit your Yale Law School application. A failure to comply with these policies may prevent the review of your application or result in the withdrawal of an offer of admission.

Dean's Certification

Yale Law School does not require submission of a dean's certification form(s) as part of the initial application. In the event an offer of admission is extended to you and you choose to accept that offer, you will be required to submit a dean's certification form from each college or university degree program in which you are, or have been, enrolled, regardless of whether a degree was awarded. The dean's certification form and a complete set of instructions will be provided to admitted students.

All offers of admission are contingent upon the satisfactory completion of the dean's certification requirement. Discrepancies between an applicant's answers to the questions in the Character and Fitness section of the admission application and the information provided in dean's certification forms will be considered sufficient grounds for the revocation of an offer of admission.

Interview Program

Yale Law School will continue piloting an interview program it began in the 2022-2023 application cycle. A small number of applicants will be selected for interviews as part of the evaluation process. If you are selected for an interview, the Admissions Office will contact you with additional information. Your application will not be disadvantaged if you are not selected for an interview.

Yale Law School Personal Statement Examples

Yale Law School Personal Statement Examples

Yale Law School personal statement examples are useful tools to understand the content, structure, and narrative flow of strong personal statements. The personal statement is only one component of how to get into Yale Law School , which also includes a 250-word essay and other, supplementary essays. There are many types of law school personal statement examples , but Yale Law School has specific requirements for their program. One unique aspect of the Yale Law School personal statement is that candidates do not have to explain why they want to go specifically to Yale Law School, but rather why they want to go to law school in general.

This article will detail other, sought-after characteristics of personal statements for Yale Law and provide examples.

>> Want us to help you get accepted? Schedule a free strategy call here . <<

Article Contents 10 min read

How to get into yale law school.

As an Ivy League school, Yale is one of the most prestigious law schools in the world, and there are thousands of applicants each year for only a few hundred spots. The Yale Law School’s acceptance rate hovers around 8% of applicants, so it is a very competitive program. All aspects of a potential candidate's application, including personal statements, are considered in the admissions process.

Want to learn how to write a law school personal statement that will stand out while avoiding common mistakes? Check out this video:

LSAT and GPA 

Two central components of a Yale Law School application are your LSAT and GPA scores, which should be higher than 155 and 3.32, respectively. However, if you're exploring how to get into law school with a low GPA , keep in mind the importance of your personal statement and other writing samples like a law school letter of intent .

Law School Diversity Statement

Yale Law School also asks – but does not require – that applicants submit a law school diversity statement , which is more of an opinion-style essay about what your identity means to you than a personal statement, which is a general narrative about your motivation for going to law school and becoming a lawyer.

Addenda 

Applicants may also submit any addenda as a supplement to the rest of the application. Reading law school addendum examples is a good way to brush up on what to include and how to write one, but they are not that different from personal statements, and you should consider whether you need to include one with your application.

Letters of recommendation from two professors who you studied under are also a part of any Yale Law School application.

Activities Section

Another written section of the Yale Law School application is the activities section, which covers basic questions, including what you have been doing since you graduated (if it has been more than three months), what you did as an undergrad, what you did when you had time off during your undergrad, and a general question about personal activities or pursuits.

Standardized Tests

Yale Law School will accept scores from several types of standardized tests, including the LSAT (Law School Application Test), GRE (Graduate Record Examinations), LSAT-Flex, and GRE General Test at Home. However, you must submit scores from only one of your tests and declare which test score you are submitting on your application.

Yale Law School has specific formatting requirements for personal statements that include:

Yale Law School also asks applicants to pay attention to what the school’s admissions officers refer to as “movement” in the personal statement. “Movement” is a law school personal statement tip that can help push along your story, so you don’t get stuck describing one single event in unnecessary detail.

Two to four pages is more than enough space to encompass important, relevant aspects of your personal story, but you should not feel like you must write up to four pages. Write down things about your past, present, and future that affected your decision to become a lawyer, but do not deviate into recalling difficult moments in your life, or inane details from your law student cover letter .

Yale Law School Personal Statement Example #1

I had two choices before me: working as an entry-level inventory clerk at a high-end clothing retailer or becoming a community organizer in a low-income neighborhood, organizing residents to improve their environment. I was very proud of my application to the luxury clothes retailer and was charmed by my interviewer, who was friendly, outgoing, and sympathetic.

At the time, I was in my second year of undergrad at Emory as a philosophy major. A lot of my classes were about modernist and existentialist philosophy – Spinoza, Heidegger, and Sartre – but by some accident, I had started reading more politically minded thinkers like Antonio Gramsci, Rosa Luxembourg, and Marx himself.

I felt a kind of bombast when I started learning more about political and economic exploitation in our society. I had always had a keen desire for the pursuit of justice, and after learning more about the ingrained, systematic exploitation our society is based on, I felt the need to put my reading, learning, and knowledge into action.

The job at CORE (Community Organization for Residents of Emory) seemed to offer that opportunity – at least, I thought it did at the time. I called the personable interviewer from my other job offer, who graciously accepted my refusal and even supported my decision when I told him the job I was taking. I felt even more justified in my decision.

My first day at CORE involved going door-to-door in high-rise buildings trying to organize (read: sign up) new members and get them to commit to paying monthly dues to support the organization. I was a little disappointed that my job as a community organizer involved getting money from working-class people and immigrants.

I imagined rousing residents of these high-rises into action, marching in the streets to demand more affordable rents, more accountability from landlords, more maintenance and repairs, and better living conditions, in general. But people were not interested. In my first few weeks, I went to various low-income neighborhoods trying to sign people up.

I told my supervisor about my reservations, and he put things into perspective. “All those things you are talking about,” he said, referring to my desire for direct political action, “will only be possible if we remain independent, which means collecting dues and having a strong, active membership who supports the organization."

I took his words to heart and rededicated my efforts to sign up more people. But my zeal took me to another extreme. I did not realize how far I had gone to the other side until we had a free tax clinic at our offices. Before they met with our accountant, I was supposed to pitch people to become a dues-paying member of CORE.

I met with one woman who was initially receptive to my pitch but declined when I asked her to become a member. I had been trained to answer a “no” with prepared prompts that could skirt their refusal, and every time she repeated “no,” I kept pushing. Frustrated with my insistence, she got up and said she was going to leave if I didn’t stop.

Taken aback, I stopped, got up, and left the room. This is not what political organizing was supposed to be. I was ashamed that I had not listened to that woman who was clearly not interested and concluded that I did not have the skillset to become a community organizer, even though I still had an intrinsic desire to do good.

It was around that time that Obama had been elected president, and I remembered one day as I rode the bus home that he too had worked as a community organizer in Chicago after completing his undergrad and before attending Harvard Law School. I don’t have any political aspirations, but I understood that real, definitive change is won through the framework of the law, more than direct political action.

I switched my major from philosophy to political science and graduated with Honours. By the time I graduated, I knew that I wanted to become a lawyer, but I wasn’t sure of what law to practice. I worked as a summer associate for Alden Reid, a law firm in Atlanta, where I spent time carrying out law research, conducting mock interviews with lawyers, and drafting motions for all kinds of cases.

I formed a close relationship with one of the lawyers at the firm, Galen Rizzuto, who encouraged me to apply to Yale Law School because it was where his mentor went. The flashy Mr. Rizzuto was always dressed to the nines and could remember the fineries of a legal brief faster than anyone I have met.

After my stint at Alden Reid, I spent another year working as an intern at the Legal Defense Fund for the South Side, which helped low-income offenders find legal representation. The people who came into my office had not committed violent crimes but had other legal problems, like unpaid parking tickets, misdemeanor, and simple loitering charges. Their lives had been upended for little more than jaywalking, and things snowballed from there. Hearing their stories made me see the other side of what I did at CORE. Instead of getting people to sign up and pay dues, I was listening to people who needed help for their very real problems.

It was in that clinic that I realized I could actually help people and not just promise them change in exchange for a few dollars a month. I knew that my future lay in learning the law, preferably housing and tenant law, which is an area of the law that has grown in significance with the colliding interests of corporate ownership, gentrification, and the loss of affordable housing.

We had spent almost a year preparing the motion to grant a new trial, and it felt like another year waiting in the courtroom hallway for the judge’s decision. I was part of a twelve-member team made up of pre-law students that worked to help exonerate James Sweeney, who had been convicted of a double murder based on dubious, now-discredited evidence.

Sweeney was an itinerant, drug-addicted unhoused person who was caught with clothes and other personal items he claimed he found, but which the police believed made him the prime suspect in the murders of a local, married couple. Having no idea of his right to legal representation, Sweeney went willingly with the police, believing he could get a warm meal and a few hours out of the cold.

The police interrogated Sweeney for almost twelve hours, and he offered up a full confession, even though he knew he was innocent. The officers celebrated, and the prosecutor’s office was more than happy to go to trial, but on the legal advice of a comprised and incompetent public defender who has since been disbarred, Sweeney accepted a plea deal that saw him go to prison for life.

Sweeney entered prison with a fourth-grade education, but seeing that he had nothing but time, he set about educating himself. He earned his GED within a year of entering prison and later applied to a pre-law correspondence course, which he successfully completed in four years. Having gained an in-depth knowledge of the law, Sweeney began advocating for his innocence, writing letters to law firms all over the country.

While Sweeney was writing his letters, I was still pondering my future. I had entered undergrad at Cornell as an English major because I had vague ambitions to become a writer, even though I knew I was not particularly talented. One evening, I went with a friend to see the Norman Jewison film, The Hurricane, which was – something I did not know at the time – based on the true story of the wrongly convicted boxer, Rubin “Hurricane” Carter. As Carter’s story unfolded on-screen, it was easy to see how racial prejudice, police overreach, and prosecutorial malpractice could all combine to create an environment ripe for injustice. Yet no one spoke up, save Carter himself.

As you will know, Carter was ultimately exonerated and became involved in helping free other wrongly incarcerated prisoners. Carter’s story was a revealing portrait of the complexity of the law and how it can be used to send an innocent man to prison – but also to free him. I left that cinema wanting to know more about Carter’s story, which eventually led me to the work of Bryan Stevenson. He runs the Equal Justice Initiative and has participated in the exoneration of countless wrongly convicted people.

However, as inspiring as Stevenson’s story is, I realized that it is a sad commentary on how our society has barely changed since the time when Carter was falsely accused and convicted. People continue to be caught up in legal dragnets without any oversight or accountability, and it takes the Bryan Stevensons of this world to shine a light on these injustices.

I read that the Equal Justice Initiative and other similar organizations offer internships to pre-law students to help with researching and investigating. I immediately became excited at the prospect of working with other dedicated students to help right the wrongs of a disinterested and indifferent justice system.

I decided to change my major to criminology with a focus on habeas corpus, sentencing prejudices in the modern jury system, and how social changes can move toward legitimacy via the legal system. In my third year, I applied for an internship at the Innocence Project, which is where I worked on the Sweeney case. Sweeney continued writing letters until he reached a partner at a Toronto firm who had attended a lecture given by Stevenson and referred Sweeney to the Innocence Project. The case was easy enough to investigate given that many of the witnesses, police officers, attorneys, and prosecutors were still alive.

Sweeney’s conviction was based entirely on his confession, so there was no physical evidence tying him to the crime. When none of Sweeney’s DNA matched any found at the crime scene, we decided it was time to file a motion to have his case dismissed. We worked to collect as much exculpatory evidence as possible from witnesses who saw Sweeney when he was supposedly committing the murders.

The lead attorney had delivered arguments in court, but we were not permitted to be in attendance and had to wait outside. Word came from the court clerk that the judge had reached a decision. The attorneys went back inside, while we listened on the closed-circuit TV. The judge granted the motion, and Sweeney walked free that same day.

I got the chance to befriend Sweeney, and he was a great source of inspiration and motivation. He helped me define my interests in the law and focus on social justice as a form of social defiance that uses the law to undo or right injustices performed by the law. James Sweeney passed away a few months ago, and his memory, dedication, and perseverance in the face of such incredible odds are what inspire me to write this letter and apply for this program.

Yale Law School personal statement examples are key to helping you write your own personal statement for Yale Law, along with all the other writing pieces you need to submit. The personal statement is required, but the other parts, like the diversity statement and other addenda, are optional, so you should think about the scope, content, and structure of your personal statement before submitting additional writing.

There are only a few unique aspects of writing a personal statement for Yale Law School, like the formatting requirements, but you also do not have to specify a reason for attending Yale Law specifically.

The Yale Law School personal statement requirements are that your statement must be two to four pages in length, double-spaced, and divided between an inciting incident and your reflection on it. 

You should include personal details about why you decided to go to law school and become a lawyer, and the fact that you are ready to commit yourself to law school. 

You should not overshare about a personal problem that is unrelated to your academic career, or mention things about your CV, resume, or transcripts. You should also keep your story short and make connections between it and your desire to become a lawyer. 

Yes, a written personal statement is a requirement to enter Yale Law School, along with submitting your score from a standardized test, three letters of recommendation, and a letter outlining your activities during your undergrad. 

Yale Law School admissions officers emphasize that your personal statement should embody “movement”; that is, your statement should not get bogged down in describing irrelevant details. You should move your story along to create a compelling narrative. 

The current acceptance rate for Yale Law School is around 8%, but it varies every year. College admissions consulting can help you focus on your grades and test scores if you need help. 

Yes, it is possible to be accepted into Yale Law School if your GPA is lower than the threshold, as admissions officers examine all aspects of your application and judge them against each other to create a fuller picture of you as a candidate. 

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How to Choose a Topic for a Yale Law School Admissions Essay

Last Updated: July 25, 2022 References

This article was co-authored by Clinton M. Sandvick, JD, PhD . Clinton M. Sandvick worked as a civil litigator in California for over 7 years. He received his JD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1998 and his PhD in American History from the University of Oregon in 2013. There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 30,100 times.

Yale Law School (YLS) requires applicants to submit a 250-word essay on a topic of the applicant's choice. The 250-word essay, also called the 'Yale 250' or simply 'The 250', gives members of the YLS admissions committee a chance to assess the applicant's writing and analytical abilities and gives them a peek into the applicant's character and intellectual passions. [1] X Research source The YLS application also requires a personal statement, which should not be confused with the 250-word essay. Your YLS personal statement is meant to highlight those aspects of your background that you feel may be of interest to the admissions committee and, in particular, those aspects that may not be evident from the rest of your application. [2] X Research source Whereas the potential topics about which you can write your personal statement are limited to your background, the field from which to choose the topic of your 250-word essay is much wider. Applicants may, therefore, find themselves wondering what the admissions committee is looking for in The 250 and what topic to write about. [3] X Research source

Knowing What to Write

Step 1 Know the purpose of the 250-word essay.

  • One potential topic is to write about a policy argument. A policy argument is an argument that advocates adopting a legal rule because of the benefit that it will bestow upon society or rejecting a legal rule because of the harm that it will cause to society. [9] X Research source Writing about a particular policy argument that you care about is a great way to showcase your lawyerly writing skills.
  • An example of a policy argument essay would be to take one side in the two sides of the debate as to whether a psychiatrist has a duty to warn potential victims of a mentally-disabled patient of hers. [10] X Research source Policy arguments can come into play from both sides in this case. Potential victims of such patients can argue that public safety requires that the law impose such a duty on the psychiatrist, while the psychiatrist could make the policy argument that imposing such a duty would undermine the psychiatrist-client relationship and would prevent the psychiatrist from providing proper medical care to her patient or client. [11] X Research source If you choose this topic for your 250-word essay, choose one side of this or a similar policy debate and persuasively make your case as to why you support the particular side of the debate that you do.
  • You can also write about something more personal, like a hobby or passion or anecdote. The field from which you can choose your topic for The 250 is wide, and there is no reason not to write about personal anecdotes or hobbies, so long as your essay still demonstrates your ability to write persuasively and reason logically. [12] X Research source

Step 3 Know that The 250 is “rarely a deal maker or breaker.”

Knowing What Not to Write

Step 1 Stay under the word limit.

  • Members of the admissions committee will not look kindly upon applicants whose essays exceed the word limit. Ignoring the word limit suggests to them that you did not read the instructions, you do not know how to use the word counter on your computer, or, worse, you are trying to “mock” the faculty who came up with this application requirement. [15] X Research source
  • Know that prepositions, definite articles, and indefinite articles all count as words for the purposes of the word limit. [16] X Research source

Step 2 Proofread your essay.

  • Ask a friend or family member to read your essay. [18] X Research source Others can often catch mistakes that you might yourself miss.
  • Note that the spell-checker in your word-processor will not catch such mistakes as writing “untied” instead of “united” and writing “affect” instead of “effect.” [19] X Research source

Step 3 Avoid writing about writing a 250-word essay.

  • By writing information in your 250-word essay that really belongs in an Addendum (which you are allowed to submit), you are missing the opportunity to showcase your ability to reason, write, and edit, which are skills that the admissions committee is really looking for in The 250. [24] X Research source
  • Writing in the 250-word essay about why you wish to attend YLS is also a mistake because the admissions committee members already know a great deal about YLS. Writing about why you want to attend YLS will not give them the chance to assess your writing, reading, and editing ability, all lawyerly skills that The 250 is designed to test. [25] X Research source

Writing the Essay

Step 1 Start strong.

  • E.g. if you see two back to back sentences such as, “Herons live in the northern United States. Herons live in most of Canada,” your reader will need to know what the connection is between these two sentences. [31] X Research source Steven Pinker, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (Viking 2014) p. 161.
  • You can attempt to make a connection by using words like “and,” “similarly,” and “likewise” to indicate a connection between those two sentences. [32] X Research source Steven Pinker, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (Viking 2014) p. 161.
  • Making connections in this way will help you meet the all important goal of presenting your Yale 250 as a piece of coherent prose.

Expert Q&A

  • Be open to starting over. With only 250 words, it's easy to get stuck on a single idea. However, it's rare that your first idea will be perfect. Don't be afraid to wipe the slate clean and completely rewrite. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

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  • ↑ http://www.law.yale.edu/admissions/firstyearapplication.htm
  • ↑ http://www.law.yale.edu/admissions/18913.htm
  • ↑ https://info.legalsolutions.thomsonreuters.com/pdf/perspec/2001-winter/winter-2001-5.pdf
  • ↑ http://scholarship.law.umt.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2179&context=mlr
  • ↑ Eugene Volokh, Academic Legal Writing (3rd ed. Foundation Press, 2007) p. 39
  • ↑ http://www.law.yale.edu/admissions/19217.htm
  • ↑ William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White, The Elements of Style (4th ed. Pearson, 2000) p. 23.
  • ↑ Steven Pinker, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (Viking 2014) Chapter 5.
  • ↑ Steven Pinker, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (Viking 2014) p. 161.

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Yale Daily News

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Law School announces four new optional essay prompts for 2023-24 law school admissions cycle

Announced after the Supreme Court’s decision to axe affirmative action, Yale Law School applicants now have the chance to write an optional essay centered around the themes of community engagement, leadership, determination or open-mindedness.

Staff Reporter

yale law school application essay

Madelyn Kumar, Senior Photographer

Applicants to Yale Law School must provide an academic transcript, an LSAT or GRE score, letters of recommendation and a personal statement. 

New this cycle, applicants can now also submit an additional optional essay, which the Law School announced just weeks after the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down race-conscious admissions policies.

The new optional component, added in August, allows applicants to write an essay on one of four topics. The topics center around the themes of community engagement, leadership, determination and open-mindedness. According to the Law School’s website, these essays should focus on the “personal, professional and/or academic experiences” of an applicant rather than their specific reasons for wanting to attend Yale Law School. 

For Jake McDonald LAW ’25, the new prompts are “a welcome change” because they expand the definition of diversity to encompass voices from a wider variety of backgrounds, including ideological, socioeconomic and religious perspectives, allowing applicants to talk about those subjects more freely.

Yash Chauhan ’26 told the News he believes the prompts allow applicants a chance to tell the admissions committee who they are beyond their grades and test scores. 

“These optional essay prompts — while markedly different from diversity statements — allow candidates the chance to showcase their drive, passion and aspirations,” Chauhan wrote to the News.

In previous application cycles , applicants had the opportunity to include an optional diversity statement in their application. This essay allowed applicants to address any core aspect of their identity that, in their view, would have contributed to the Law School community and might not have been sufficiently addressed in their personal statement. 

According to McDonald, the diversity statement had a fundamental flaw: an ambiguous framing of diversity, which he felt left many applicants with no idea on whether to write the optional statement.

However, Sage Mason LAW ’24 told the News that the diversity statement allowed his Law School application to present a more complete picture of his identity and experiences.

“My application process to YLS was atypical because I transferred [to Yale] after my first year of law school at Washington University in St. Louis,” Mason said. “I included a diversity statement as part of my application, and it contributed greatly to providing a more complete expression of who I am and what I thought I could offer a place like YLS.”

The diversity statement is no longer listed as an application component on the Law School’s website for the 2023-2024 law school admissions cycle.

McDonald told the News that he believes the removal of the diversity statement and the addition of the new prompts may have to do with the Supreme Court’s June decision that struck down race-conscious admissions.

“[I believe] the explicit diversity statement from years past — including the year I applied — is gone because the school was worried about its legal viability in light of the Supreme Court’s recent ruling in SFFA v. Harvard,” McDonald wrote to the News.

Debra Kroszner, the spokesperson for the Law School, declined to comment on whether recent application changes were motivated by the Court’s ruling against affirmative action. 

In the Court’s majority opinion , Chief Justice John Roberts said that schools can only constitutionally consider the race of an applicant if it is “concretely tied to a quality of character or unique ability that the particular applicant can contribute to the university.” 

In other words, applicants can still discuss their race or ethnicity in admissions essays, but admissions officers can only consider any mentions of race if they are directly relevant to an applicant’s unique accomplishments. It remains unclear , however, what cases would be deemed as directly relevant, leaving specifics of what the Court’s ruling should look like in practice at the University — and at other higher education institutions — unknown.

Though the Law School has not addressed whether the updated essay prompts are related to the Supreme Court’s June decision, its website claims that it continues to uphold its commitment to a holistic review process .

“Applicants may choose to submit an essay in response to one of the four questions … each related to a value that is central to the Law School community,” the website reads. “This is an opportunity to provide readers with relevant information that may not be found elsewhere in your application.”

Kroszner declined to comment on this story overall; she referred applicants to the Law School’s website for information regarding the school’s admissions process.

Yale Law School was founded in 1824.

Correction, 10/11: A previous version of this article misquoted a source. The article has been fixed accordingly.

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How to get into yale law school - acceptance rate & stats.

yale law school application essay

Reviewed by:

David Merson

Former Head of Pre-Law Office, Northeastern University, & Admissions Officer, Brown University

Reviewed: 12/8/23

If Yale is your dream law school, read on to learn about Yale Law School requirements, how to write admissions essays, admissions statistics, and more.

Yale University

Yale Law School is a highly prestigious and respected law school, and as such, it’s very difficult to get in! This guide will cover everything you need to know about how to get into Yale Law School, including requirements, admissions stats, the application process, and much more. 

Yale Law School Acceptance Rate: 5.5%

The Yale Law School acceptance rate is 5.5%. In the most recent admissions cycle, 246 students were offered admission out of 4,471 applicants. 

To give you some more insight into Yale Law’s acceptance trends, here are the acceptance rates from the past few years: 

Source: ABA Required Disclosures

How Hard Is It To Get Into Yale Law School?

It’s very difficult to get into Yale Law School. Only around 200 students are accepted each year out of thousands of applicants. 

In comparison to the national average acceptance rate of 41% , Yale’s acceptance rate is incredibly low. But don’t lose heart; while it’s hard to get into Yale Law School, it’s not impossible. An excellent application can boost your chances. 

Yale Law School Programs Offered & Ranking

Yale Law School offers several law school pathways for students. Take a look below for more program information.  

Source: Yale Law School

Joint Degrees 

Yale Law School also offers students the opportunity to pursue a graduate or doctorate along with a J.D. Some joint degrees include: 

  • J.D.–M.A. (Master of Arts) 
  • J.D. and MEM (Master of Environmental Management) 
  • J.D.-MBA (Masters of Business Administration) 

students walking on college campus

Yale Law School Ranking

Yale Law School is currently tied with Stanford Law as the #1 best law school in the nation , according to U.S. News. It also ranks #6 in Above the Law’s top 50 law schools.

Yale Law also ranks highly in many other categories, including: 

  • #2 in Constitutional Law
  • #3 in International Law
  • #4 in Clinical Training
  • #9 in Business/Corporate Law 

These rankings make Yale a very desirable and prestigious school to attend! 

Yale School of Law Admissions Statistics

When applying to law school, it’s helpful to be familiar with the averages of the incoming class so that you can better prepare your application. Here are some stats from Yale Law’s most recent incoming class. 

female student studying from book

Yale Law School Average GPA: 3.96

Yale Law School’s median GPA for the most recent class was 3.96. This is incredibly high, so to be a competitive applicant, you’ll need to study hard during your undergrad! 

Because there are no cutoffs for GPA, there are no actual Yale Law School GPA requirements. However, Yale does offer information about the undergraduate GPA distribution of its accepted students: 

Bear in mind that the average GPA is likely higher than this because the low-end value is an outlier. For your best chance of admission, strive for an undergraduate GPA close to 4.0 or higher. 

If you have a low GPA , focus on making the rest of your application as strong as possible! 

Yale Law School Average LSAT Score: 175

The average LSAT score for Yale Law School admitted students is 175. Again, this is a very impressive score, so make sure that you put a lot of effort into studying for the challenging LSAT !

While Yale also doesn’t have any explicit test score cutoffs, the school released information on students who submitted LSAT scores for consideration: 

Yale Law GRE

Yale Law School began accepting the GRE test in 2019, and admissions officers stated there is no preference for either test. That said, Yale did not publish data about students who submitted GRE scores. 

However, the ETS has an online tool that you can use to predict LSAT scores based on your GRE scores. For example, obtaining a score of 169 in each GRE section would equal an LSAT score of 176, just one point over Yale’s median score. 

male student working on laptop

Yale Law School Requirements

Getting into Yale Law School means you need to complete your LSAC application. Yale Law School admissions requirements are: 

  • A bachelor’s degree (you must hold one or are expected to receive one before you apply) 
  • Academic transcripts submitted to LSAC from every college/university you attended 
  • Personal statement 
  • A 250-word essay 
  • An optional diversity statement or addenda 
  • At least two recommendation letters, ideally from at least two professors 
  • An activities section about what you did during your undergraduate education 
  • LSAT or GRE scores 
  • A dean’s certification (after you’ve been accepted into the program) 
  • An application fee of $85 or a fee waiver, if applicable 

Completing these Yale Law admissions requirements is imperative to your application’s success: remember to start the process early to collect all necessary documents! 

Yale Law School Letters of Recommendation

Yale Law strongly recommends that you gather recommendation letters from people who can speak to your academic abilities and performance. Letters from professors are preferred. However, if you’re unable to obtain recommendations from professors, you can substitute letters from other sources, like employers. 

According to Yale Law School’s recommendation tip sheet , your letters should focus on your skills that are relevant to success in law school. So, you should choose recommenders who can speak to your critical thinking, communication, research, and problem-solving skills. 

two female students studying together outside

Yale Law School Personal Statement + Examples 

Yale Law School essays are crucial to your application's success. They serve as an opportunity to show why you're an excellent candidate and delve deeper into your character and motivation to attend law school. You’ll have to write a personal statement for law school, whether you’re an incoming student or a transfer student . 

The law school personal statement should help Yale admissions officers “learn about the personal, professional, and/or academic qualities an applicant would bring to the Law School community.” 

Often, a personal statement you’ve crafted to send to multiple law schools (without school-specific information) will work for Yale. These tips can help your Yale Law personal statement stand out. 

  • Answer 3 Main Questions : Jon Perdue , Yale’s Director of Recruiting and Diversity Initiatives, says that students should answer these questions: 1) Why me? 2) Why law school? And 3) Why now? 
  • Share Your Story : Consider which anecdotes help uncover your personality and potential to succeed as a future lawyer. 
  • Stick to the Standard Format : Keep your statement approximately two pages double-spaced, using a standard font, font size, and margins. 
  • Choose Your Approach : Perdue says students tend to focus on either the past, present, or future, but the most successful statements have a sense of movement and touch upon more than one of these. 
  • Maintain a Professional Tone : Keep your tone professional even if you decide to write about sensitive material. Do not victimize yourself or provide details or tragedy or other topics that might make your reader uncomfortable. 

These personal statement example excerpts and feedback can help you guide your writing. 

male student writing on notepad

Personal Statement Example #1

“ During the summer of 2012, I worked at Company in my hometown of City. For three months, I calibrated the temperatures of furnaces that heated the steel to make it malleable, I fixed broken motors that rolled the steel into coils, and I balanced chemical compounds that were used to prevent the metals from rusting. At 19 this was my job, and I thought it would be for the rest of my life. 

At the height of the Great Recession, my dad lost his job and we lost our home. During my senior year of high school, I began working graveyard shifts at Dollar Tree to help my family make ends meet. After working for a few months, I realized that if I went to college my family would struggle financially, so I withdrew all my pending college applications and decided to continue working after high school instead…

Although the work was interesting, I felt trapped. The mill is isolated in a dark and dangerous factory fenced off from the general public. Workers spend their entire lives working there never knowing a career outside the mill...During my first week interning at Company, a two-ton coil fell off a crane and crushed a worker to death. All of this made me uneasy. The idea of spending the rest of my life working in this environment seemed unimaginable.

This feeling of uneasiness was exacerbated when I was offered a full-time job at the steel mill as long as I completed my last year of night classes. I grew up in a working-class community where a job like this was like winning the lottery. This job would allow me to help my family get back on their feet and provide us with a comfortable life. However, I was not interested in living a comfortable life. Two months into the second year of night classes and after much deliberation, I dropped the apprenticeship and made the decision to pursue a bachelor’s degree.

…I thought I would never have the chance to go to college or leave my hometown. Working at Company made me realize that I was settling and not living up to my full potential. When my dad found employment during the end of my internship at Company, I saw an opportunity to change my career path and I took it.

I was fortunate to be able to leave my apprenticeship to pursue my bachelor’s degree. Many college bound students I went to high school with also had to work after their parents were laid off during the recession. They were also trapped…I knew when I made the decision to go to college, I had to push boundaries not just for myself, but for all my peers who had to trade in their dreams for financial security. 

Although I faced backlash from my family for making the decision to go back to college, I was determined to get my bachelor’s degree to learn how to address the issues that plagued my community and others like it. As an undergraduate student, I studied, traveled, and worked with different organizations that provided me further insight into the issues that immigrant and working-class communities face. I took what I learned from my undergraduate experiences to the California State Senate to work on solving the most pressing issues facing Californians; from negotiating criminal justice reform and addressing the affordable housing crisis, to improving public transportation in the Bay Area and writing legislation that expands the social safety net.

It has now been over six years since I made the decision that changed the trajectory of my life. As grateful as I am for all the wonderful things that I have been able to do so since leaving the apprenticeship, my desire to continue pushing boundaries and advocating for low-income communities has only grown stronger. I am ready to exert this passion into my work in law school and in my career as a lawyer .”

What Made This Personal Statement Good

This personal statement answers the three main questions: why law, why now, and why them. The "why now" has the most weight in this essay: deciding to go to law school was all about timing in an otherwise tricky financial situation. 

It also has the element of movement Perdue described as the hallmark of an excellent personal statement: the author mainly reflects on the past but weaves in elements of their current work and hopes for the future. 

Personal Statement Example #2

“ In the stories I loved growing up, the world stood in black and white. There were always heroes and villains, Jedi and Sith, knights and dragons, and the ultimate triumph of good over evil. I recognized, of course, that in real life things weren’t always so clear-cut, but I also felt confident that I could still tell the difference. Heroes helped and villains harmed, heroes loved and villains hated, and in the end heroes would inevitably win and villains would inevitably suffer because they, by their nature, deserved to…

During the summer following my freshman year of college, I found myself tucked in the sunny office of a clinic at School, poring over an entirely different sort of story, one unlike any I had read before. To start, nobody had taken the time to write the story out. It was scattered across hospital records and report cards and interviews and old newspaper clippings and family photos…

I read about the boy’s father, who held a job and went to church, but sometimes drank and screamed and swung at his family, and who seemed to care more about his vintage car than his son. I read about the boy’s mother, an immigrant woman who worked long hours every day, who loved her son with every ounce of her soul and pleaded with him to stay in school. And of course, I read about the boy himself, who loved his mother back, and who was quiet in class but struggled to keep up. The boy sometimes ran with the wrong crowd but mostly kept out of trouble – until his beloved mother died when he was just fifteen, and he fell in with a gang that made him feel like he belonged, as long as he could prove he deserved to. And although I knew why I was reading this boy’s story, it was not until I saw the surveillance video of the boy shooting and killing a police officer during a robbery gone awry that I could come to terms with where his story went. The boy, now a young man, sat on death row several states away, and his case was one of the handful adopted by the Clinic at School to try and prevent his execution.

I didn’t find any heroes in the boy’s story…I grew frustrated and then furious with how many systems failed him, how many cracks he slipped through, how many times his life could have diverged from the path to this tragedy but did not.

But as much as I searched, I couldn’t find any villains, either. I was desperate to trace the root of all these evils, to identify the person at whose feet I could lay all this pain, but I came up empty-handed…More importantly, it became clear to me that the boy himself could not be the villain in his story, not after I realized how profoundly vulnerable and neglected and just plain human he was, and still is. The boy’s act, his panicked and instantly regrettable pull of a trigger, was terrible, but only the hardest of hearts could read his story and believe the boy was terrible, too. 

I was left with a story without knights or dragons, without someone to blame or someone to admire…And yet, it was the most compelling story I had ever read, in no small part because its ending could still be shaped, still be turned toward redemption or hope or at the very least mercy, and away from the tragic, violent loss of another life. I had joined the Clinic out of a mostly abstract objection to capital punishment, but what I learned there resolved my motivations into sobering solidity. If I could help tell the boy’s story, and the stories of those like him, others might come to the same realization I had: those whom the news and the authorities branded monsters and villains were just people, in all their complexity and fallibility and endless capacity for growth.

Over the years since that summer, I’ve worked alongside capital defense attorneys and mitigation specialists to uncover the stories of our clients’ lives and to fashion those stories into shields against the violence of state power. In this pursuit, I find that triumphs are few and far between, and heroes even rarer. However, I also find the absence of that clarity increasingly and surprisingly welcome. Each and every narrative blurs and subverts the dichotomies I once relished, pushing me to consider each person on their own terms, to take in the totality of their pasts rather than solely their worst moments, and to exercise active and intentional empathy toward even those deemed irredeemable. It’s a practice I don’t always find natural or easy, but it’s one I hope to continue throughout my life and legal career. Rather than seeking to stand solely with heroes, to me it now matters far more to stand with those whom society may have written off, but whose endings are not yet written. ”

Despite focusing on one central anecdote, this personal statement still has that element of movement Perdue discussed. The story focuses mainly on the past but does illuminate snippets of the present and the applicant's hopes for the future. 

This personal statement has an excellent narrative thread: although we're introduced to the author's love of heroes, villains, and stories, they make a point of referencing this main idea throughout their essay. This personal statement is successful with compelling imagery and a very human and compassionate perspective on justice. 

student sitting on ground writing in notebook

Yale Law School 250-Word Essay + Examples

This short essay is not the same as your personal statement. You’ll be responding to a pre-given prompt, so you’ll need to be sure that you tailor your response to what Yale Law is looking for.

Yale’s 250-word essay prompt is as follows: 

“The Law School is a vibrant intellectual community where students are expected to engage academically with faculty and fellow students. In no more than 250 words, applicants must write about an idea or issue from their academic, extracurricular, or professional work that is of particular interest to them. The idea or issue you choose does not have to be law-related; this is an opportunity for readers to learn more about how you would engage intellectually in the Law School community.” 

Here are some tips to help you tackle this essay: 

  • Understand the Prompt’s Requirements : Break it down into 2 parts; write about your idea or issue, and then connect the idea or issue to your experiences with a clear transition. 
  • Understand the Essay’s Purpose : The admissions committee wants to learn more about you and topics that matter to you, as well as your thought processes and intellectual ability. 
  • Choose Your Topic Wisely : It’s important to choose something that’s relevant and meaningful to you. Many applicants write about a thesis/major project, work issues, or ethical challenges faced at work/school/extracurriculars. 
  • Keep It Concise : The prompt is intentionally broad, but the admissions committee will notice if you exceed the limit, so keep your writing tight! 
  • Show Your Fit : Yale Law wants to see how you’d engage with academic life on campus, so be sure to approach your writing with sophistication and professionalism to show why you’re an excellent fit. 

These are two past 250-word essay examples provided by Yale Law School. 

Essay Example #1 

“For the last 18 years, millions of U.S. armed forces servicemembers deployed to various combat zones across the Middle East and Africa to defeat conventional and unconventional enemies. I have personally known scores of these servicemembers (including many currently in harm’s way) and several friends and mentors who made the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of the people of the United States. In my view, one of the most egregious circumstances surrounding these combat deployments is the failure of policymakers to update and reaffirm the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) passed in 2001. This would officially put the weight of Congress and the American public behind the decision to send servicemembers to fight—and die—for their country in new conflicts.

Since 2001, the AUMF has been invoked several times to justify actions not only in Afghanistan and Iraq, but in Syria, Somalia, Libya, and other nations. While the nuances of an AUMF vis-à-vis a formal declaration of war may make one preferable to policymakers over another, I believe there is a significant gray area in the way the 2001 AUMF has been used, and that the constitutionality of its expanded use should be called into question. I hope to explore this issue as well as others related to congressional and presidential war powers in my future work at Yale Law. My personal connection to these national security issues and others will help bring a human perspective to policy discussions in the Yale Law classroom.”

soldiers walking

What Makes This a Good Essay

The author has a personal connection to their main issue, clearly stated as policymakers' failures in updating and reaffirming AUMF. The author connects and expands on this issue by suggesting that it should be called into question, something they hope to explore in the Yale classroom. 

Overall, this essay fulfills the two prompt requirements, shows passion and knowledge in this subject area, and shows the applicant will contribute to meaningful discussion at Yale; the author's personal connection fortifies the message. 

Essay Example #2 

“ Growing up, I was taught that Islam’s beauty is couched in its purity: the religion is perfect because it has never been tainted or influenced. When my Islamic Art professor, Professor, introduced us to the Gbain masking tradition, I was initially unsettled. The West African practice used in ritual dances evolved from the literal and cultural intermarriage between Muslim merchants, Berber armies, and local tribes within the 8th and 14th centuries. To my professor, the syncretism of indigenous tradition and Islam was the most fascinating aspect of Islam in West Africa. She showed us Islam-inspired half-moon inscriptions on a half-cow half-human Gbain mask and extolled the malleability of the religion in adapting to local customs. To me, however, “malleability” felt more like blasphemy. A core tenet of Islam is aniconism; masquerade and figurative dances both violated that principle.

For my term paper, I studied West African masquerade further—and encountered a new perspective. Muslim colonizers allowed tribes to continue their dances as a tool of assuagement when incorporating them into their political structures. As someone who seeks to decolonize my analysis of art and history in good faith, I had fallen victim to my internal predispositions and obviated the indigenous position. Islam was not the forcefully corrupted creed; it was the very vessel of colonial takeover. It was difficult to acknowledge that my convictions had clouded a fair judgment of the indigenous art. Sometimes decolonizing requires deconstructing our own beliefs—for that is what masquerade was to the Gbain. ”

map of Africa

What Makes This a Good Essay 

The author introduces their idea with excellent background information and imagery. They connect this idea through their major term paper, in which they challenge their views and perspectives. This shift in perspective shows the author's ability to change positions based on new information, even concrete, lifelong beliefs. 

This commitment to fairness in light of a challenging subject shows their candor and suitability for a law career.

Optional Essay 

Optional Yale Law School essays include a diversity statement and addenda.

If you choose to write a diversity statement, it should teach the admissions committee more about you and show how you’ll contribute to Yale. 

A diversity statement may not be necessary if you've touched upon your background and identity at length elsewhere in your application. These tips can help you write a compelling diversity statement:

  • Decide Whether You Should Write One : You may not need a diversity statement if you’ve already written at length about your identity/background. However, you may consider writing this essay if you feel you can offer more insight into your core identities. 
  • Maintain Your Application Narrative : Explain how your identity impacted your passion for law school and show how you can contribute to the school and incoming class. 
  • Reflect on Your Experiences : Think about transformative moments you’ve lived through, what you learned, and how they changed your path’s trajectory. Apply these reflections to your decision to become a lawyer. 

Yale Law School Tuition & Scholarships 

Yale Law School tuition costs $71,540 for the 2023-2024 academic year. However, with other fees and personal expenses, students can expect to pay roughly $100,000 per year to attend Yale School of Law. 

See below for a full breakdown of the cost of attending Yale Law: 

Yale Law Scholarships

man looking in wallet

If you’re intimidated by the cost of Yale Law School, don’t worry! Yale has financial aid policies in place that will help students afford their law degree. You can receive need-based assistance and can also apply for various outside scholarships . 

Yale also offers the Hurst Horizon Scholarship Program , which covers full tuition for students pursuing legal education. It is designed to help students from all financial backgrounds afford law school. 

Yale School of Law Application Deadlines 

You need to submit your Yale Law School application by February 15, 2024. Bear in mind that there will be no admission-related advantage to submitting your application early, so take as much time as you need to put together a stellar application. 

Here are some other important dates to know:

There are two main steps to apply to Yale Law School : you’ll need to subscribe to the Law School Credit Assembly Service (CAS) and create and submit applications through LSAC. 

Yale Law School Bar Passage Rate: 95.77%

Yale Law School’s first-time bar passage rate in 2023 was 95.77%. This is significantly higher than the ABA average pass rate at 78.4%! 

With a bar passage rate this high, it’s no wonder why Yale is a highly-respected law school. 

notebook next to laptop

How to Get Into Yale Law School: Tips to Improve Your Admission Chances

Getting into Yale Law may seem like an intimidating task, but don’t fret. Here are some tips to help you gain admission to Yale Law School! 

  • Less is More : It’s okay to have fewer materials in your application if those materials are strong. This goes especially for recommendation letters -- Yale advises students to prioritize having only two strong letters over adding a third weak one to the mix. 
  • Be Authentic : According to Yale Law’s personal statement tip sheet , authenticity really matters. Don’t exaggerate or dig for anecdotes that you think might be what Yale wants to hear. Just be true to yourself and your own experiences. 
  • Study Hard : You’re going to need a very high GPA and LSAT score to compete with the other Yale Law applicants. Make sure you prioritize your schooling and dedicate lots of time to studying. 

With these tips to get into Yale Law School, you’re sure to be a competitive candidate. 

What Does Yale Law School Look For? 

It’s important to make your application stand out, but how do you know what to focus on? To help you tailor your application to Yale, we’ve done some research. 

Here are some qualities related to what Yale Law School is looking for in students: 

  • Initiative : Yale Law seeks to encourage students to “ blaze their own path and effect positive change .” If you can show the admissions committee that you’re ambitious and innovative, you’ll be an impressive candidate!
  • Desire to Serve : Being a lawyer is about serving and helping others. Yale’s law programs are “ grounded in meaningful service .” They look for students who demonstrate empathetic hearts and a passion for public service. 
  • Academic Excellence : Yale Law School seeks applicants who strive for academic achievements in all areas. 

FAQs: How to Get Into Yale Law School

These FAQs can help you get additional information you may need on how to get into Yale Law School. 

1. Can You Get a Full Ride to Yale Law School?

Yes, depending on your financial situation. The Soledad ’92 and Robert Hurst Horizon Scholarship Program was created to allocate full-tuition scholarships to 45-50 J.D. students who demonstrate the highest need annually. These scholarships are automatically awarded to students who meet eligibility requirements. 

2. What Do You Need to Get into Yale Law School?

To get into Yale Law School, you must have a high GPA, stellar LSAT or GRE scores, expertly-crafted essays, and a differentiated profile demonstrating your fit and passion for law. 

3. What GPA Do You Need for Yale Law School? 

Although there are no GPA cutoffs for applying to Yale Law School, it’s in your best interest to achieve an undergraduate GPA as close to or higher than 4.0 for your best shot at acceptance. 

4. Does Yale Law Prefer Yale Students? 

While an older news article states that Yale College students were some of the best applicants, there is nothing to suggest that Yale Law School gives preference to Yale students. A varied profile and robust application will help you in the admissions process, no matter where you went for undergrad. 

5. Is Yale or Harvard a Better Law School? 

Based solely on rankings, Yale is the better law school. However, the best law school for you depends on program offerings, your goals, and preferences. Both Yale and Harvard are excellent institutions. 

6. What LSAT Score Do You Need to Get Into Yale Law School? 

Like GPA, there is no explicit cutoff for LSAT scores at Yale Law School. However, given that the median score submitted by students is 175, you should strive for at least that score or better for a better chance of admission. 

7. What is the Lowest GPA Accepted to Yale Law School? 

According to the most recent class profile, the lowest GPA accepted to Yale Law School was 3.25. However, it is unlikely that you’ll gain admission to Yale with a low GPA unless the rest of your application is outstanding.

Getting Into Yale Law Is Easy If You Know How 

Yale Law School is highly selective, but knowing what you need to get in can make it easier and increase your chances of acceptance. With a high GPA, stellar LSAT or GRE scores, and the tips outlined above, you can make the most of your application and kickstart your law career! 

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Application Instructions

Every law school posts its application on LSAC . The Instructions section often includes important information about deadlines, recommendations, scholarships, and other requirements that do not appear anywhere else on the application. We've compiled the Instructions of schools in the T50 below.

See also our compilation of essay prompts and notable short-answer questions.

1 Yale University Instructions

Introduction.

While the small size of Yale Law School—approximately 200 in each entering class—requires a selective admission process, we are committed to a holistic review of every application we receive. Overall, the Law School seeks the most promising students in terms of professional and academic distinction. We seek to admit students who can both perform very well academically and also contribute meaningfully to the Law School community. We read all applications and take all factors into account in a comprehensive review process. There is no cut-off point for grade point averages or test scores. No one part of an application is conclusive and the potential for academic and professional excellence can be demonstrated in many ways. You can read more online about Yale Law School and our most recent entering class .

HOW TO APPLY

In order to apply to Yale Law School, you must subscribe to the Law School Credential Assembly Service (CAS). You can register for CAS with the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). Yale Law School requires applicants to submit their applications through the LSAC electronic application service included as part of a CAS subscription.

WHEN TO APPLY

Yale Law School will open its application for the Class of 2024 on September 1, 2020, and applications can be submitted beginning on October 1, 2020. Applications must be submitted by no later than February 15, 2021. It is your responsibility to make certain that all items arrive at Yale in a timely fashion. Please note that it may take several weeks for LSAC to process your materials.

Under our review process there is no advantage, in terms of the likelihood of admission, to applying earlier in the application cycle. In other words, your chances of admission remain constant regardless of when you submit your application.

APPLICATION FEE & NEED-BASED FEE WAIVERS

Applications must be accompanied by a non-refundable $85 application fee, which will not be credited to tuition in the event of admission. The application fee is waived automatically for those applicants who have received an LSAC fee waiver.

If you do not have an LSAC fee waiver and would like to request a need-based fee waiver of your Yale Law School application fee, please request a fee waiver using our online application . Need-based fee waivers are generously granted, and parental information is not requested as part of the fee waiver application. We will notify you whether or not we decide to grant your waiver request. If your request is approved, you will be given a fee waiver code to enter during the submission process for your Yale Law School application.

Please note that neither the request for, nor the granting of, a need-based fee waiver has any bearing on admissions decisions. Yale Law School employs a need-blind admissions process and encourages applicants from all socio-economic backgrounds to apply.

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES & ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPTS

You must receive, or expect to receive, by the summer of 2021 a bachelor's degree (or the equivalent) from an approved undergraduate institution in order to be eligible to apply. All offers of admission are contingent upon graduation.

You must submit to LSAC transcripts from each college or university you attended, including all schools you attended for graduate or professional study. Even if one school includes summary data regarding courses from another school on its transcript, an official transcript from each institution must be submitted. Yale Law School strongly encourages applicants to submit transcripts, through the LSAC, reflecting all coursework completed through the time of application and further encourages applicants to submit updated transcripts as additional coursework is completed. We suggest that you allow at least six weeks for a transcript to be processed by LSAC. For detailed instructions, please visit the LSAC transcript webpage .

In light of the circumstances posed by COVID-19, Yale Law School recognizes that transcripts may reflect mandatory or optional pass/fail or credit/no credit grades. These grades will not be viewed negatively by the Admissions Office and the Law School will maintain a holistic review process for all applications. We encourage all applicants to make decisions about grading schemas based on their needs, and the Law School will be flexible in recognition of these unprecedented challenges.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

Yale Law School accepts results from the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test . Additionally, the Law School accepts results from the LSAT-Flex and the GRE General Test at Home , which are viewed as equivalent to the standard LSAT and the standard GRE General Test, respectively. We do not have a preference among these standardized tests.

If you choose to apply with the LSAT, you must take the LSAT no later than January 2021. LSAC automatically reports all LSAT scores from the past five years. The oldest LSAT score we will accept is June 2015. If you have taken the LSAT since June 2015, you do not have the option not to report your score(s) to the Law School—your score(s) will be included in the information that we receive in your CAS report from LSAC. Your LSAT score(s) will be a part of our holistic review of your application.

LSAC requires at least one LSAT writing sample, taken either at the time of the LSAT examination or via LSAT Writing , in order to generate your CAS report. Yale Law School requires only one LSAT writing sample. Applicants who take the LSAT more than once do not need to submit multiple writing samples. It may take several weeks for LSAC to process and report your LSAT Writing. Therefore, you must complete your LSAT Writing no later than January 16, 2021, in order to ensure we receive it by the deadline.

If you choose to apply using the GRE General Test, we must receive your GRE scores from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) by our application deadline, February 15, 2021. Because it may take up to 15 calendar days for ETS to transmit your scores once you complete the exam, you should take the GRE no later than February 1, 2021. Applicants who have taken the GRE can log into their ETS accounts and select Yale Law School as a recipient of GRE results using the school code 4542.

To maintain parity between our evaluation of LSAT and GRE results, applicants who apply using the GRE must submit all GRE scores from the past five years. When reporting your GRE scores to Yale Law School, please select the option to report your entire testing history. Selecting this option will report all of your GRE scores for the past five years. A failure to comply with this policy may result in the withdrawal of an offer of admission.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Yale Law School requires at least two letters of recommendation. We strongly prefer letters from at least two professors with whom you have studied who can speak to your academic performance and who have had a chance to personally evaluate significant aspects of your academic work. Letters from employers, college deans, coaches, chaplains, colleagues, and others may be helpful, but are not preferred. If possible, they should not replace letters from two faculty recommenders.

Applicants who have been out of school for some time or who are otherwise unable to obtain two faculty recommendations may substitute letters from employers or others who know them well. These letters should address the qualities that academic recommendations typically address, for example: the applicant's ability to write and think critically, as well as their overall suitability for the study and practice of law.

All letters of recommendation must be transmitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service , which is included as part of your CAS subscription.

We will begin review of your application as soon as we have received two letters of recommendation. We will not hold your application in order to wait for additional letters. To ensure that all of your recommendations are available for consideration, please verify that they are on file with LSAC prior to applying to the Law School.

PERSONAL STATEMENTS & 250-WORD ESSAYS

Applicants are required to submit two essays: a personal statement and a 250-word essay. Faculty readers look to these two pieces of writing to obtain a nuanced picture of each applicant.

The personal statement should help us learn about the personal, professional, and/or academic qualities an applicant would bring to the Law School community. Applicants often submit the personal statement they have prepared for other law school applications.

The 250-word essay is an opportunity to explore an idea or issue from your academic, extracurricular, or professional work that is of particular interest to you. The idea or issue you choose does not have to be law-related; this is simply another opportunity for faculty readers to learn more about how you would engage in the Law School community.

You will have the opportunity to include optional addenda to your application if any are necessary for a full representation of your candidacy, for example: a diversity statement or explanations related to test scores or transcripts. It is not necessary to include any, and many applicants do not include addenda.

Yale Law School welcomes, but does not require, a diversity statement, which many applicants submit to help us learn more about them and how they would contribute to our community. Other applicants choose not to include diversity statements, especially if they have otherwise covered key aspects of their backgrounds and experiences in their applications. One way to decide whether to include a diversity statement is to consider those aspects of your identity that are core to who you are, and make sure they are represented in your application.

DEAN'S CERTIFICATION

Yale Law School does not require a dean's certification form as part of the initial application. In the event an offer of admission is extended to you and you choose to accept that offer, you will be required to submit a dean's certification form from each college or university degree program in which you are, or have been, enrolled, regardless of whether a degree was awarded. The dean's certification form and a complete set of instructions will be included in the materials sent to admitted students.

All offers of admission are contingent upon the satisfactory completion of the dean's certification requirement. Discrepancies between an applicant's answers to the questions in the Character and Fitness section of the admission application and the information provided in dean's certification forms will be considered sufficient grounds for the revocation of an offer of admission.

REVIEW PROCESS & NOTIFICATION

The Admissions Office will notify you by e-mail when your application has been received and when it is complete. The most efficient way for you to learn whether or not Yale Law School has received your application is to check your LSAC account to see whether Yale has requested your CAS report. The amount of time that it takes to process an application varies throughout the admission cycle. December through February are peak application times both for the Law School and LSAC; applications submitted at this time will take longer to complete.

Applications are considered approximately in the order in which they are completed. Your application will be considered complete and ready for review once the Law School receives your application materials, a CAS report, an LSAT and/or GRE score(s), and two letters of recommendation. We will not hold your application in order to wait for additional letters of recommendation, later test scores, or any other additional materials. To ensure that all of your recommendations are available for consideration, please verify that they are on file with LSAC prior to applying to the Law School.

An applicant to whom an offer of admission is being made will be notified immediately. Given our holistic review of each application and the significant involvement of faculty members in the review process, our decision-making process can be lengthy. We appreciate your patience throughout the review process.

If admitted, Yale Law School may use information derived from your application, including your name, contact information, and basic biographical information, to connect you with members of the Law School’s community. If you do not consent to the sharing of such information, please contact the Admissions Office at [email protected] .

Please note: We cannot provide decision information over the phone. If you have a deposit or scholarship deadline at another school, please send to us an e-mail with your name, LSAC account number, telephone number, the name of the school, type of deadline, and deadline date.

ADMISSION OFFERS & SCHOLARSHIPS FROM OTHER LAW SCHOOLS

If you receive an offer of admission and/or a scholarship offer from another law school before hearing from Yale Law School, please be aware that LSAC's Statement of Good Admission and Financial Aid Practices provides member law schools with best practices for law school admission and financial aid programs.

First, law schools should allow applicants sufficient opportunity to consider other offers before requesting a commitment of any kind. Second, each school should allow applicants to freely accept a new offer from another law school even though a scholarship has been accepted, a deposit has been paid, or a commitment has been made to their school. Thus, law schools should never ask you to withdraw your application to Yale Law School before YLS has made a decision on your application.

In addition, please note that Yale Law School will consider applications from individuals who have accepted admission through deferred admissions programs for college sophomores and juniors.

FINANCIAL AID

All financial aid packages at Yale Law School are calculated on need-based criteria.

U.S. citizens and permanent residents should submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to Yale Law School by March 15, 2021. Even if you have not received a decision from us, you should submit your FAFSA information by March 15. In the event that an offer of admission is extended to you, you will be given access to Yale Law School's Financial Aid Application and Scholarship Tool (FAAST). You will need to submit your information to FAAST before your financial aid package can be generated. International applicants need to submit their information only to FAAST.

Visit Yale Law School Financial Aid online for additional information about our need-based aid system and to learn about other ways the Law School financially supports its students and graduates.

CERTIFICATION & VERIFICATION OF INFORMATION

By agreeing below to the instructions, you certify that the information you have provided on your application form, in any related materials submitted to Yale Law School, and in any communications with Yale Law School, is accurate to the best of your knowledge, and that all written work is your original work. You understand that Yale Law School may verify information included in or related to your application and you give your consent to such verification. You agree to notify Yale Law School of any changes in the provided information or of any further information that might affect your eligibility for consideration as a prospective student. You understand that all offers of admission are contingent upon the satisfactory completion of the dean's certification requirement. You understand that any discrepancies between the information you provided as part of your application and any other information you provide to Yale Law School, information Yale Law School receives from dean's certification forms, letters of recommendation, or through any action Yale Law School takes to verify information in or related to your application will be considered sufficient grounds for the revocation of your offer of admission to Yale Law School.

CITIZENSHIP STATUS

Yale Law School is committed to equal opportunity and accessibility to all candidates who show great academic and personal promise irrespective of citizenship status. Yale Law School evaluates applications without regard to a student’s citizenship or immigration status, and all students are eligible for the Law School’s need-based financial aid. These policies include undocumented students living in the U.S., whether they hold DACA status or not.

NONDISCRIMINATION, TITLE IX & CLERY ACT STATEMENTS

The University is committed to basing judgments concerning the admission, education, and employment of individuals upon their qualifications and abilities and affirmatively seeks to attract to its faculty, staff, and student body qualified persons of diverse backgrounds. In accordance with this policy and as delineated by federal and Connecticut law, Yale does not discriminate in admissions, educational programs, or employment against any individual on account of that individual's sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a protected veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. University policy is committed to affirmative action under law in employment of women, minority group members, individuals with disabilities, and protected veterans. Inquiries concerning these policies may be referred to Valarie Stanley, Director of the Office for Equal Opportunity Programs, 221 Whitney Avenue, 3rd Floor, 203.432.0849. For additional information, see equalopportunity.yale.edu .

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, Stephanie Spangler, at 203.432.4446 or at [email protected] , or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or E-mail: [email protected] .

In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) as well as other applicable federal and state laws, the University publishes an annual campus security and fire safety report. This report contains three years’ worth of campus crime statistics concerning crimes committed within the geographical limits of the University as defined by the Clery Act; security policy statements; fire safety information; and a description of where students, faculty and staff should go to report crimes. The fire safety section of the annual report contains information on current fire safety procedures and if any fires occurred within an on campus student housing facility. You may request a copy from the Office of Administration, P.O. Box 208322, New Haven, CT 06520-8230, or by contacting Yale Public Safety at 203-432-4400. A copy is also available online .

2 Stanford University Instructions

Please review the application procedures and requirements on the Stanford Law School website before completing this form.

Below you will find detailed instructions specific to the Stanford Law School application.

  • BIOGRAPHICAL: Complete the Biographical section.
  • BIOGRAPHICAL - GENDER : Complete the Biographical - Gender section.
  • CONTACT INFORMATION: Complete the Contact Information section.
  • DEMOGRAPHICS: Complete the Demographics section. If you are a U.S. citizen or a U.S. registered permanent resident, please indicate your ethnic origin. Although self-identification of ethnicity and race is voluntary, the U.S. Department of Education requires Stanford to report on the composition of its student enrollment. No information you provide will be used in a discriminatory manner.
  • OPTIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS: Complete the Optional Demographics section if you wish to do so.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Complete the Background Information section if you wish to do so.
  • PREVIOUS APPLICATION: Indicate if you have previously applied to Stanford Law School and list the date (month and year) you applied.
  • HIGH SCHOOL INFORMATION: List your high school name, location, and year of graduation.
  • EDUCATION: List all colleges, universities, graduate and professional schools, and any study abroad program(s) you have attended. An affirmative answer to question 2 also requires a letter of good standing from your law school to be sent directly to the Office of Admissions. List academic honors, awards, or other recognitions you have received in the order in which you received them.
  • EMPLOYMENT: Question 1: List employment while in college, summer employment while in college, and full- or part-time work since graduating from college. Question 3: Please list any significant extracurricular, community, or other activities. lease utilize the required résumé to provide detailed information regarding your employment history and extracurricular activities.
  • STANDARDIZED TESTING: List in chronological order all the dates on which you have taken, or intend to take, the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and/or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Note that scores for tests taken prior to June 2015 will not be considered valid. Applicants for Fall 2021 admissions must take the LSAT no later than the January 2021 administration and the GRE no later than February 1, 2021.
  • OTHER STANFORD PROGRAMS: Indicate if you are applying or planning to apply for a joint degree program and/or the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program. For details regarding each joint degree program, please visit our website . Note that the programs with Johns Hopkins and Princeton are external to Stanford and are therefore considered cooperative rather than traditional joint degree progams. For details regarding the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program, please visit their website .
  • CHARACTER & FITNESS: Complete the Character & Fitness section. You must attach an explanatory statement to your application if any questions are answered in the affirmative.
  • LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: List the names of the persons you have asked to complete your letters of recommendations.

3 Harvard University Instructions

Harvard Law School Application Instructions Juris Doctor (J.D.) Program

We are pleased that you have chosen to apply for admission to Harvard Law School (HLS). HLS combines an unmatched range and depth of world-class educational resources with a collegial community of faculty and students. We encourage you to explore our website to learn more.

This application is only for students who meet the eligibility criteria below. If you are a Junior Deferral Program or Transfer applicant, please do not use this application.

J.D. Eligibility Requirements

  • All applicants must hold or expect to hold a bachelor's degree prior to August of the year for which they apply to enter (except in cases where all requirements are met prior to September and degree conferral occurs after September).
  • All applicants must take either the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  • All applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS).

When to Apply

  • Priority deadline: February 1 (11:59 p.m. ET)
  • Application closes: March 1 (11:59 p.m. ET)

We encourage you to submit your application before the February 1 priority deadline.

Please note that due to the volume of materials we receive, it normally takes several weeks to process your application materials and match them to your file. You will receive an email notification that your application is “complete” and ready for review once your required materials have been successfully processed and matched.

Application Process

Electronic submission.

HLS J.D. Admissions does not accept hard copy paper materials. Any application updates may be submitted directly through the status checker. For more information, please visit our website .

When you transmit your application electronically, you can either use the electronic signature and fee payment option (preferred), or use the electronic signature and send our office a check or money order to pay for your application fee.

Applications transmitted to LSAC for forwarding to our office will be considered submitted on the day they are transmitted to LSAC .

The Application Materials

Note: Please do not write your social security number on additional materials such as your personal statement, resume, or additional statements; use your LSAC account number for identification purposes.

Application Fee or Fee Waiver The application fee is $85 (non-refundable). You may pay the fee by credit card when you submit your application or you may mail a check or money order payable to Harvard Law School. Do not send cash. Please note that the processing of mailed checks or money orders may be delayed due to remote working conditions related to the ongoing COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

If payment of the application fee poses a severe financial hardship, please follow the instructions below:

If you are applying to HLS with a LSAT score and if payment of the application fee would pose a financial hardship, we recommend (but do not require) that you first apply for a fee waiver through the Law School Admission Council. Fee waivers from LSAC cover multiple application fees and some LSAC services, and a LSAC fee waiver may be the best way for you to reduce application-related expenses. If LSAC has granted you a LSAT/LSAC Credential Assembly Service Fee waiver and you apply to HLS, your application fee will be waived.

If you are applying to HLS with a GRE score or are interested in requesting an application fee waiver directly from HLS, please visit our website to fill out the J.D. Application Fee Waiver Request Form. Application fees are waived on the basis of financial need as demonstrated by information on the Fee Waiver Request Form. The deadline to request an application fee waiver is February 1 (11:59 p.m. ET). We cannot accommodate any fee requests made after February 1.

No application for admission will be considered before the application fee has been paid or a fee waiver request has been approved.

Application Form It is very helpful for you to provide as much information as possible on the online form itself before referring the reader to attached materials. You may include an addendum to your application if you need additional space.

Resume We require a resume as part of the application. Please limit your resume to one or two pages. Please visit the HLS J.D. Admissions website for samples.

Personal Statement The personal statement provides an opportunity for you to present yourself, your background, your ideas, and your qualifications to the Admissions Committee. Please limit your statement to two pages using a minimum of 11-point font, 1-inch margins, and double spacing. The personal statement is intended as an opportunity to give the Admissions Committee a better sense of who you are as a person and as a potential student and graduate of Harvard Law School. In many instances, applicants have used the personal statement to provide more context on how their experiences and strengths could make them valuable contributors to the Harvard and legal communities, to illuminate their intellectual background and interests, or to clarify or elaborate on other information in their application. Because applicants and their experiences differ, you are the best person to determine the content of your statement.

Required Standardized Test Score All applicants to the J.D. program must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) reports all LSAT scores from the past five years. Similarly, students who take the GRE are required to submit all valid test scores from the previous five-year period.

Applicants who elect to take the GRE (instead of or in addition to the LSAT) must instruct the Educational Testing Service (ETS) to send HLS all GRE test scores from the preceding five-year period. Applicants who have taken the GRE can log into their ETS account and select Harvard Law School as a recipient of GRE results using the school code: 2135.

Credential Assembly Service (CAS) All applicants to the J.D. program must register with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Visit the LSAC website for more information. You must also send all undergraduate and graduate transcripts to LSAC.

Letters of Recommendation Letters of recommendation must be submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. Two letters of recommendation are required, but you may submit up to three. We strongly recommend that at least one letter of recommendation come from an academic source. In our experience, two thoughtfully selected recommenders are likely to be more effective than several chosen less carefully. Your application will be treated as complete with two letters of recommendation.

Optional Statement The Admissions Committee makes every effort to understand your achievements in the context of your background and to build a diverse student body. You may choose to submit an optional additional statement to elaborate on how you could contribute to the Harvard Law School community. We ask that you limit your optional statement to one page using a minimum of 11-point font, 1-inch margins, and double spacing. If an optional statement runs over one page, it will be read. However, we ask that you use your best judgment to determine whether or not your optional statement should exceed the one-page expectation.

Additional Information We encourage you to provide any relevant information that may be helpful to us in making an informed decision on your application. Examples of information that may be relevant to individual cases include: unusual circumstances that may have affected academic performance, a description or documentation of a physical or learning disability, or a history of educational or sociological disadvantage. If a close relative has attended HLS, you may submit this information in this section.

College Certification Form While not required as part of the application process, College Certification forms will be required from admitted students prior to matriculation and may, in some cases, be required prior to admission. The College Certification will be filled out by an official from your school to confirm your degree as well as to confirm the responses you provided on your application to your character and fitness questions. If you have any questions about how your college will answer these questions, please contact your college's Registrar or Dean of Students office.

Information for Foreign-Educated Applicants

Harvard Law School requires that your foreign transcripts be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS). If you completed any postsecondary work outside the U.S. (including its territories) or Canada, you must use this service for the evaluation of your foreign transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is if you completed the foreign work through a study abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. If this is the case, please be certain that your home transcript lists the course title, credit level, and grade awarded. This service is included in the CAS subscription fee. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your CAS report. Questions about the CAS can be directed to LSAC at +1 215- 968-1001, or [email protected] .

Reapplication/Previous Applicants

If you have applied to Harvard Law School in the past, you must be currently registered with the Credential Assembly Service to apply again. If you last applied to the class entering in 2017 or an earlier class, you must file an entirely new application. If you last applied to the class entering in 2018 or a more recent class: 1) you must submit a new application form, personal statement, updated resume, updated transcripts (if applicable), and pay the application fee, and 2) you may choose to submit new letters of recommendation or rely on those in your previous application.

All materials received by the Admissions Office are retained for three years. We cannot return materials or provide copies.

Application Status Information

Once we receive your application, we will send you an email acknowledgment with your status checker credentials. In addition, we will request your Credential Assembly Service report from LSAC. Please note that we will send you another email when your application is “complete” and ready for review by the Admissions Committee. LSAC will notify you when your report is sent to us. Due to the volume of reports and other materials we receive, it can take several weeks from the date your report is sent to the date it is matched to your file.

After we receive your Credential Assembly Service report, we will notify you that either:

  • your application is "complete" and submitted to the Admissions Committee for review, or
  • your application remains "incomplete," noting the missing materials. Once all missing materials arrive, we will send notification of completion.

Although we cannot respond to application status inquiries by telephone, you may use the online status checker to review your application's progress. We will share the application status checker link with you once your application has been received.

Admission Decisions

We begin reviewing complete applications in September. We review applications roughly by order of completion date. For more information, please visit our website .

We will not normally provide the status of an application by telephone, or release any information on an application to anyone other than the applicant. We are obligated to protect confidentiality and privacy; these policies help to serve that purpose.

All decisions are final.

Contact Information

Please note that email is the best way to contact the J.D. Admissions Office. Items submitted via postal mail may be delayed due to remote working conditions related to the ongoing COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

J.D. Admissions Office Harvard Law School, Austin Hall 1563 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138

[email protected] +1 617-495-3179

https://hls.harvard.edu/dept/jdadmissions/

Important Notices

Application materials.

Please be aware that your application materials become part of your official student record. For admitted and matriculating students, HLS J.D. Admissions may share information contained in your admission materials with other Student Service Offices at the University.

Notice of Nondiscrimination

Harvard Law School does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, disability, source of income, or status as a veteran in admission to, access to, treatment in, or employment in its programs and activities

Inquiries regarding the application of the Law School's nondiscrimination policy may be referred to the following Law School coordinators of that policy:

  • Jessica Soban (Dean’s Office) Interim Associate Dean for Student Services 617-495-3109
  • Kristi Jobson (J.D. Admissions) Assistant Dean for Admissions and Chief Admissions Officer 617-495-3179

Please refer to Harvard Law School's Handbook of Academic Policies for more information regarding this notice.

Inquiries concerning the application of nondiscrimination policies regarding race, color, national origin, age, sex, or disability may also be referred to the Regional Director, Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, JW McCormack PO & Courthouse, Room 222, Boston, MA 02109-4557.

Qualifications for Admission to the Bar

In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners .

Annual Security and Fire Safety Report Availability

The University is required by federal law (The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, 20 U.S.C. 1092(f), known as the “Clery Act”) to publish an Annual Security Report and an Annual Fire Safety Report.

The Harvard University Police Department (HUPD) publishes the Annual Security Report, entitled “Playing it Safe,” which includes information about the HUPD, how to report a crime, HUPD’s crime prevention programs, substance abuse, sensitive crimes, emergency notifications, and other important information about security and HUPD services on campus. It also contains three years of statistics on reported campus or campus-related crimes. A hard copy of “Playing it Safe” may be obtained by contacting the Harvard University Police Department at 1033 Massachusetts Avenue, 6th floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, 617-495-9225.

The Harvard University Environmental Health and Safety Department publishes the Annual Fire Safety Report, which includes fire safety polices, evacuation procedures, and fire statistics. A hard copy of the Annual Fire Safety Report may be obtained by contacting the Environmental Health and Safety Department at 46 Blackstone Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, 617-496-7168.

The Annual Security Report, “Playing it Safe,” is available at www.hupd.harvard.edu/annual-security-report .

4 Columbia University Instructions

Please note that applications to Columbia Law School must be submitted electronically through LSAC . Paper applications will not be accepted.

Kindly note that any application materials must be submitted directly by the applicant to LSAC or to Columbia Law School - as applicable in accordance with our instructions - not through an agent or third-party vendor. This requirement does not apply to letters of recommendation, which must be submitted directly from the recommender, nor to dean’s certifications or academic transcripts, which must be submitted directly from an official university dean, registrar, or other administrator (please continue reading below for additional information regarding these requirements). In addition, the applicant will be required to attest to the accuracy and authenticity of all information and documents submitted to LSAC and to Columbia. If you have any questions about this requirement, please contact the Office of Admissions at [email protected] .

To avoid any confusion or delay in the processing of your application, please ensure that you: (1) consistently use your proper name; (2) keep us informed of any mailing address, telephone number, or email address changes during the application process; and (3) write your LSAC account number on all correspondence with the Office of Admissions.

Method of Application

  • Early Decision Plan

For Early Decision candidates, the law school application process is simplified and expedited considerably; it is less expensive in terms of time, effort, and money. Early Decision candidates must complete their applications by November 15, 2020 and are generally notified of the Admissions Committee’s decision in December. Candidates applying on an Early Decision basis commit themselves to matriculate at Columbia if admitted. Successful Early Decision candidates may not initiate any new law school applications, must immediately withdraw other applications once notified of their Columbia acceptance, and must decline any acceptances they may have received prior to admission to Columbia under the Early Decision Plan. Failure to honor these commitments will result in Columbia revoking its offer of admission.

Some Early Decision applicants not offered admission will be reviewed again in April as part of the Regular applicant pool; others will be informed that their application for admission has been denied and will not be evaluated again that year.

  • Regular Admission

Candidates for Regular admission should submit their applications as soon as possible after September 1, 2020. Applications are not evaluated by our Admissions Committee until all required materials have been received and are generally evaluated in the order in which they are completed. Candidates who have completed their applications by December may expect to be notified by March. Every effort is made to notify all applicants of the Admissions Committee’s decision by the end of April, provided that their files are completed by February 15, 2021 —Columbia’s application deadline for Regular admission to the JD program.

Please note that candidates who have already completed at least one year of an ABA-approved J.D. program or the LL.M. program at Columbia Law School are not eligible to apply for regular admission and must apply as transfer candidates. Graduates of all other ABA-approved LL.M. programs at U.S. institutions must apply for regular admission and are not eligible to apply as transfer candidates.

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)/Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

All applicants are required to submit scores from the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) to be considered for admission to Columbia Law School.

The LSAT and the GRE are administered in many locations throughout the world. Your application will not be considered without the results of the LSAT or GRE. For additional information about the LSAT, contact LSAC at 215.968.1001 or visit www.LSAC.org . For additional information about the GRE, contact Educational Testing Services (ETS) at 866.473.4373 or visit www.ETS.org .

Candidates who submit scores from more than one LSAT administration and/or GRE administration are strongly encouraged to provide a brief addendum that explains their testing history.

Candidates applying for admission to the 2021 entering class as regular applicants may submit LSAT scores earned on or after the June 2016 administration but no later than the January 2021 administration. Early Decision applicants must take the LSAT no later than October 2020.

All LSAT scores from administrations within the last five years will automatically be forwarded with a candidate's Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Report.

Candidates applying for admission to the 2021 entering class planning to submit GRE scores are required to have sent from ETS all GRE scores from exams taken within the last five years using Columbia Law School's ETS code 4046. Candidates applying for admission to the 2021 entering class as regular applicants may submit GRE scores from tests taken between June 1, 2016 and February 1, 2021. Early Decision applicants must take the GRE no later than a November 1, 2020 administration.

Note: As per the American Bar Association, you must submit any and all LSAT test scores, even if you also plan to submit one or more GRE test scores. Candidates with multiple GRE scores, applying on the basis of the GRE, must submit all GRE scores on file from test administrations within the last five years.

Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

All applicants are required to participate in the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) for processing of transcripts, whether you are submitting LSAT or GRE test scores. For more information about the CAS, please call 215.968.1001 or visit www.LSAC.org .

  • U.S. Transcripts

Applicants must request that the Registrar of each college (and each graduate and professional school, if applicable) attended send an official transcript to the CAS for processing. If you have participated in summer sessions or studied abroad, you must send these transcripts directly to the CAS, unless such courses and corresponding grades are also included on the other college transcripts being forwarded to the CAS. Please forward updates of your transcripts to the Office of Admissions as soon as they become available. In particular, candidates enrolled in a degree-granting program at the time the application is submitted are strongly encouraged forward their fall 2020 transcripts as soon as they become available. Unofficial transcript copies that include fall 2020 grades may be submitted to [email protected].

  • International Transcripts

Applicants who have completed more than one academic year of post-secondary work outside the United States and Canada are required to submit such transcripts to the CAS for processing. Such transcripts must be submitted in their original language with an official English translation, if the original language is not English. Please forward updates of your transcripts to the Office of Admissions as soon as they become available. In particular, candidates enrolled in a degree-granting program at the time the application is submitted must also forward their fall transcripts as soon as they become available.

Candidates who studied abroad for one academic year or less are strongly encouraged to submit official copies of their transcripts if the grades do not appear on the home institution's transcript. If candidates run into difficulty having these transcripts sent from institutions abroad, then an unofficial copy of the transcript (PDF format preferred) may be uploaded in the "Addendum" section of the application. In most instances, the Admissions Committee prefers to consider a candidate's performance in study abroad courses, and requesting transcripts can often slow down the review process.

Letters of Recommendation

  • Requirements

Columbia requires two letters of recommendation to complete your application.

Candidates completing their undergraduate degrees in 2019, 2020, or 2021: We require applicants currently in school or recently graduated (i.e., applying within less than approximately two years of receiving their degree) to submit two academic letters from faculty who can provide insight about their candidacy. Academic letters must come from individuals who have taught applicants in the classroom or have evaluated applicants in a significant academic capacity ( e.g., an independent study project or thesis advisor).

Candidates who completed their undergraduate degrees in 2018 and earlier: Applicants with substantive work experience who are not recent graduates are strongly encouraged to submit one professional letter and at least one academic letter of recommendation.

Candidates who believe they may jeopardize their employment status by requesting professional letters of recommendation may submit an academic letter of recommendation instead and should include a brief addendum explaining why they have not included a professional letter of recommendation.

While the Committee will accept up to four letters of recommendation, we suggest that applicants use discretion when determining the appropriate number of letters to submit. Kindly note that your application will be deemed complete after we have received two letters unless we are notified otherwise in question 9.2.

  • Suggested Content

Recommenders should address matters of significance that speak to the ability of the applicant to thrive in an intellectually stimulating academic environment. For example, recommenders may address the strength of the applicant’s overall intelligence, analytical skills, independence of thought, problem-solving skills, effectiveness of oral and written communication, motivation, self-confidence, concern for others, emotional maturity, personal initiative, judgment, leadership ability, and organizational skills.

  • Submission of Letters of Recommendation

Columbia Law School strongly prefers that letters of recommendation be sent through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. LSAC sends Columbia letters of recommendation once a week; therefore, your letters of recommendation will essentially be forwarded to us as they become available. Please do not send duplicate letters directly to Columbia Law School.

If absolutely necessary, recommenders may themselves send letters of recommendation directly to Columbia Law School in a sealed envelope with their signature across the envelope seal. We do not accept letters of recommendation via fax or email. Please note that sending hard copies of recommendation letters directly to Columbia Law School may delay completion of an application.

Supporting Documents

Applicants must submit electronically through LSAC the following documents:

Application Form

Applicants are required to complete and submit the application for admission.

Personal Statement

Applicants must submit a personal essay or statement. It must be electronically submitted at the time of the initial application. We kindly ask that applicants submit a personal statement that is double-spaced and approximately two pages.

Applicants must submit a résumé, detailing significant full- or part-time employment positions they have held. This may include internships, summer employment, and community service. In addition, the résumé should include a summary of written scholarship, presentations, principal extracurricular activities, and any honors or awards received. It must be electronically submitted at the time of the initial application. Applicants may submit résumés longer than one page in length but should exercise discretion when determining résumé length.

  • Optional Supplemental Statements

Applicants, if they wish, may submit brief supplemental statements that will provide useful information to the Admissions Committee in evaluating the application. The Committee especially welcomes addenda that allow it to understand the contribution your personal background would add to the Columbia Law School community.

  • Dean’s Letter, if applicable

If you answered yes to question 8.1 and/or 8.2, please have the dean or administrative officer in charge of student records forward a detailed explanation of the incident to the Columbia Law School Office of Admissions. Should you receive an offer of admission and ultimately matriculate at Columbia Law School, you are also required to submit a completed Dean’s Certification Form, which will be made available to you by the Office of Admissions at a later date. These forms must be emailed from an official university address to [email protected] (strongly preferred method) or sent in hard copy form ( faxed copies cannot be accepted ) to the Office of Admissions. Please note that sending a hard copy directly to Columbia Law School may cause a delay in our receipt of such documents and should only be done if necessary.

Application Fee

The application fee is $85 (U.S. funds only). It is strongly preferred that applicants pay online with a credit card when submitting their applications through LSAC. Applicants who can only pay using a check or money order must print out, sign, and mail the Certification Letter to the Office of Admissions along with the check or money order (made out to Columbia University). Applicants who plan to pay by check or money order should do so well in advance of the deadline to allow sufficient time for processing.

Candidate Interviews

Some candidates may receive an invitation to participate in an interview with a member of the Admissions Committee. We understand that many of our applicants will want to interview, and we appreciate your enthusiasm, but interviews are by invitation only.

JD Program Information

Please refer to the Columbia Law School Admissions website for a full description and exploration of the JD program. You may also access an electronic copy of the Viewbook or contact the Office of Admissions to request a copy.

Admission to the JD Program

The Admissions program at Columbia Law School is designed to identify and select individuals with diverse backgrounds and interests. We aim to compose a student body that shares a discernible commitment to excellence, has demonstrated unusual promise for distinguished performance at the Law School, and possesses potential for high service to the legal profession and the community.

Notice to All Applicants

An application is considered complete when all required application materials have been received by Columbia, including receipt of the candidate’s LSAC Law School Report. In taking steps to ensure that the application to Columbia is completed before the appropriate deadline, an applicant should factor into planning the few weeks that it will take the Law School Admission Council to produce the LSAC Law School Report.

Submission of Additional Materials

Applicants are expected to be diligent in providing all necessary information for review of their candidacy prior to the completion of their applications. Once an application is complete, please do not submit additional materials unless they convey essential information, as there is no guarantee such materials will be placed in your application prior to the evaluation and may potentially slow down the review of your candidacy. Applicants may submit address changes and letters of continued interest (Hold or Reserve applicants only) through our online upload portal (https://www.law.columbia.edu/admissions/jd/apply/upload). Notification of events that are responsive to questions 8.1-8.6 must be emailed to [email protected] .

Checking on the Status of Applications

Applicants are expected to monitor the completion and submission of all application requirements and are encouraged to do so by utilizing our online status checker . In the event that the status check mechanism appears to be unduly delayed, applicants may submit written requests of such status checks by email ( [email protected] ) to the Office of Admissions.

Please note that once an applicant receives an "Application Complete" designation, no further updates are communicated via the status checker.

Candidates should understand that all Admissions Committee decisions may be communicated to the applicant only in writing. Under no circumstances may an applicant be informed of the outcome of an application by telephone. This policy is designed to protect the confidentiality entrusted to our Office of Admissions by each candidate.

Selection Criteria

Evaluation of an applicant for admission to Columbia Law School includes a determination of the candidate’s intellectual and academic qualifications, aptitude for legal study as measured by the LSAT and/or the GRE, and assessment of whether or not the candidate has demonstrated personal qualities considered requisite to scholastic success, professional distinction, and public service. In addition, the Admissions Committee examines the applicant’s personal statement and letters of recommendation, as well as the course selection, special honors and awards, fellowship opportunities, publications, extracurricular involvement, community service, political activity, professional contributions, and other work experience.

Undergraduate Preparation

Columbia Law School subscribes to the curricular guidelines provided by the Association of American Law Schools’ “Statements on Prelegal Education.” These guidelines recommend a prelaw program involving education for “comprehension and expression in words, a critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals, and creative power in thinking.” A review of undergraduate majors of recently enrolled students indicates that approximately 21 percent have backgrounds in political science and government, 14 percent in other social sciences like anthropology, psychology, and sociology, 11 percent in economics, 9 percent in pure science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, 8 percent in history, 6 percent in literature, 4 percent in international relations, and 3 percent in humanities such as classics and religious studies,. Other concentrations include business/finance/accounting, philosophy, and policy studies.

Selectivity

Competition for admission to Columbia Law School is exceptionally keen. In recent years, approximately 7,000 applicants have applied for nearly 370 spaces in each year’s entering class. And, in any given year, the majority of applicants to Columbia are highly qualified academically. In addition, admissibility to Columbia is difficult to predict because, as previously described, personal accomplishments, professional achievements, and other nonquantifiable factors that serve to enrich the student body, affect an applicant’s chance of admission. Thus, although Columbia is among a handful of the most highly selective law schools in the country (as measured by grade point averages and LSAT statistics), it is not possible to predict with precision the probability of admission using those numerical indices alone.

Committee Decisions

In addition to its “Admit” and “Deny” decision categories, Columbia Law School maintains “Hold” and “Reserve” groups of candidates.

When an applicant is placed in the Hold category, the Admissions Committee has opted to postpone making a decision on the applicant's candidacy at the time of initial review; in other words, the Admissions Committee has not yet made a determination on the application, which will be reviewed again by the Committee later in the admissions season. Hold category applicants can expect to receive a decision on their candidacy (Admit, Reserve, or Deny) by the end of April.

Unlike applicants who are “waitlisted” at some law schools, candidates placed on Reserve at Columbia are at no point ranked ordinally. Rather, each application on Reserve is reviewed again in its entirety by the Admissions Committee on a periodic basis during the summer months, as openings in the entering class materialize. Upon each review, some candidates will be offered or denied admission, while others will be asked if they wish to remain in consideration for any future openings in the class later in the summer.

The difference between the Hold and Reserve categories is that the initial review process is completed for candidates placed on Reserve. Reserve candidates will not be reevaluated for admission until the summer months, as openings in the entering class materialize. Applications placed on Hold are still being actively reviewed by the Committee, and Hold candidates should expect to receive a decision (Admit, Reserve, or Deny) by the end of April.

Columbia Law School reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission if an applicant: (1) shows a significant decline in academic performance or fails to graduate; (2) misrepresents any matter in dealing with the Office of Admissions, Financial Aid Office, or any other representative of Columbia Law School; (3) behaves in a manner that indicates a serious lack of judgment, sincerity, or integrity; or (4) reserves a place in our entering class and simultaneously commits to enroll at another law school or submits a deposit to another law school. Columbia Law School further reserves the right to make the continuing validity of an offer of admission contingent upon an applicant providing further information or authorizing the release of information from other parties in connection with any matter relevant to the foregoing.

Dean’s Certification

A Dean’s Certification Form (as distinct from the Dean’s letter referred to in the application) or an equivalent certification of good standing will be required from all students after admission and prior to matriculation at Columbia Law School.

This Form will be mandatory from each educational institution where you are currently enrolled in a degree program; from which you have already earned a degree; and at which you were matriculated toward a degree (regardless of whether a degree was conferred). Please note that it is not necessary that the dean or other administrator responsible for such certification know you personally. The dean or other administrator may complete the Dean’s Certification Form (or equivalent certification) on the basis of official records. Please note that for the Dean's Certification to be deemed complete, all questions on the form must be answered. This form must be emailed from an official university address to [email protected] (strongly preferred method) or sent in hard copy form ( faxed copies cannot be accepted ) to the Office of Admissions. Please note that there may be delays in processing of hard copy documents sent to the Office of Admissions.

Accepting an Offer of Admission

An admitted student who wishes to accept Columbia Law School's offer of admission may secure a seat by submitting a $600 seat deposit on or before May 1, 2021. The deposit may be paid either electronically through the Admitted Student Website (the easiest and strongly preferred method) or manually by check. Candidates who decide after submitting the seat deposit not to attend Columbia Law School may receive a deposit refund of $150 if the written request is submitted by July 1, 2021.

Deferred Admission

An admitted student who wishes to defer matriculation for one or two years should submit a request, in writing, to the Office of Admissions after having been offered admission, but prior to the deadline set forth in your admissions packet. This request should include a general statement explaining how the intervening time will be spent, as well as whether the student desires a one- or two-year deferral. Please note that all deferred candidates must accept the offer of admission (including payment of the seat deposit) on or before the deposit deadline of May 1, 2020, as applicable.

Tuition, Financial Aid, and Housing

Tuition for 2020-2021 is $72,352. There are additional mandatory fees for health services, student activities, and University services and support, which will be $2,538 for 2020-2021. Insurance for hospital care and standard medical coverage is also required ($3,676) unless U.S. students can show proof of comparable coverage. To help ensure that international students have access to the highest quality of care on- and off-campus, Columbia University requires all international students to enroll in the Columbia Student Health Insurance Plan. For details regarding this requirement, please visit the Health Services website . The total budget for the nine month academic year, including tuition, fees, room, board, books, and personal expenses is $104,420. Expenses are adjusted annually.

Financial Aid

Admission decisions at Columbia Law School are made without regard to an applicant’s financial need. Therefore, grant applications are reviewed only after a student has been admitted. If you are interested in grant assistance, you must complete your application as early as possible so that it can be evaluated soon after you have been admitted. Students admitted under the Early Decision Plan are reminded that they should not expect to be notified of their financial aid package before the end of March, at the earliest. We strongly recommend that applicants file the required forms by no later than February 15, 2021, even if they have not yet received an offer of admission. Admitted candidates who submit the required forms after February 15, 2021 may be considered for need-based grant assistance contingent upon availability of funds.

The Law School awards grant assistance primarily on the basis of demonstrated financial need. However, there are a number of fellowships which are not based on financial need that are awarded by the Office of Admissions at the time an applicant is admitted to the Law School. There is no separate application for these fellowships. Each year a portion of the entering class receives a Law School grant, which is in the form of a partial tuition waiver. However, by far the largest form of financial aid for all law students is educational loans, with most students borrowing to finance a part, or all, of their educational expenses. To assist JD graduates pursuing public interest and public service careers manage what might be a significant educational loan burden, the Law School provides continuing financial support through its Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP).

U.S. citizens and eligible non-citizens may be eligible for Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans. Currently, the annual limit is $20,500 for this program. In addition, the Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan program as well as several private educational loan programs are available to provide financing for law students. Since these programs require applicants to be creditworthy, you are strongly advised to obtain a copy of your credit report to determine if there are any problems that might make you ineligible for such loans. If you have an adverse credit history, and are unable to correct it, you may not have access to important sources of loan funds. If this is the case, you will need to have others borrow on your behalf or find other means to finance your education. Law School funds will not be available to replace unavailable credit-based loans.

International students (not U.S. citizens and not those holding a U.S. permanent resident visa) are eligible to apply for Law School grants and for loans from private educational loan programs. They are not eligible for federally guaranteed assistance programs. In addition, they typically need to provide a U.S. cosigner in order to apply for private educational loan programs. Please visit our website for additional loan information. Since there are no fully funded fellowships for law students in Columbia’s JD degree program, international students needing to finance their education may need to arrange for cosigners for each of the three years of law school.

How to Apply for Financial Aid for 2021-2022

The following is a summary of application procedures for the various types of financial aid. For detailed information on financial aid policies and procedures, costs, budgets, and various loan programs, please review the financial aid website .

Before completing any financial aid forms, it is important first to decide which types of aid you are seeking: (1) loans and Columbia Law School grants or (2) loans only.

  • Loans and Columbia Law School grants

Submit the following by February 15 to ensure timely consideration for a Law School grant. Do not wait to receive an offer of admission before filing the FAFSA and CSS Profile Applications:

  • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to the federal processor (U.S. Students)
  • CSS Profile application to The College Board
  • Columbia Law School Financial Aid Questionnaire to the FAO (admitted students only)
  • 2019 Federal income tax forms for student, spouse, and parents to the College Board using the Institutional Documentation (IDOC) Service (admitted students only: by February 15 or immediately after admission)
  • Loan application(s) to the FAO (admitted students intending to enroll--preferably by mid-May)

Submit the following by no later than mid-May to ensure timely processing:

  • Columbia Law School Financial Aid Questionnaire to the Financial Aid Office (FAO) (admitted students only)
  • Loan application(s) to the FAO (admitted students only)

Deciding the type of aid will determine which forms you will need to submit, and when. If you are uncertain about whether you should apply for a Law School grant, please refer to the section entitled “Scholarship Grants” within the section “How to Apply for Financial Aid” on the financial aid website .

Financial Aid Deadlines

Loans and Columbia Law School Grants—February 15, 2021

Loans Only—May 15, 2021

Financial Aid Forms

  • FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid): Completed by all U.S. citizens and eligible non-citizens applying for financial aid and submitted to the federal processor to establish eligibility for federal student aid. Apply online at https://studentaid.gov/h/apply-for-aid/fafsa.
  • CSS Profile Application: Required of all applicants who are seeking consideration for Columbia Law School grants. Financial information must be submitted for the applicant, both of the applicant’s parents, and, if applicable, the applicant’s spouse. Apply online at https://cssprofile.collegeboard.org . For questions, call 844.202.0524.
  • Columbia Law School Financial Aid Questionnaire: Admitted students receive this form shortly after their offer of admission. Admitted students applying for ANY type of financial aid must send the completed form to the Financial Aid Office.
  • 2019 Federal income tax forms: Admitted students applying for a Law School grant must submit complete copies of federal income tax forms for the applicant, both of the applicant’s parents*, and, if applicable, the applicant’s spouse to the College Board using the Institutional Documentation (IDOC) Service. If 2019 returns are not available by February 15, 2021, admitted students should submit complete 2018 returns by February 15 for a preliminary award decision, and complete 2019 tax returns by the end of April for grant confirmation.
  • Loan Application(s): Admitted students intending to enroll at the Law School should submit complete loan applications to the Financial Aid Office, preferably by mid-May in order to ensure timely processing and the availability of loan funds at the start of the school year.

*Columbia requires financial information from both parents to be submitted when you are requesting financial aid. Exceptions to our policy are made on an individual basis -- usually when there is only one parent in your life. In situations where both parents are living, an appeal for a waiver must be made, in writing, to the Assistant Director of Financial Aid and accompanied by a written statement from a third-party (e.g., an attorney, clergyperson, employer, social worker, or counselor) or court documents, detailing the nature of the relationship.

The Loan Repayment Assistance Program

Columbia Law School’s Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP) supports Columbia JD graduates who pursue public interest and public service careers by providing them with financial assistance to service the educational debt they assumed while at the Law School. In addition to the traditional LRAP, participants may elect to participate in both the Columbia Law School LRAP and the Federal Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program. Finally, several fellowships for public interest have been established, and fellowship recipients may receive assistance for all loan payments on their Law School debt. A full description of our LRAP can be found on the financial aid website , or may be requested from the Financial Aid Office.

Housing accommodations for Columbia Law students are excellent in terms of availability, quality, variety, convenience and, relative to other New York City law schools, expense. All admitted first-year law students who apply for housing by May 10, 2021, are guaranteed some type of University housing for all three years of law school. All Law School student housing are apartments owned and managed by the University, and most are located within blocks of the Law School. Rents are significantly lower than New York City market rates, because our housing is heavily subsidized by the University.

4 University of Chicago Instructions

Instructions: The University of Chicago Law School

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Applicants must set up an account with the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). Applicants to the JD program are required to apply through LSAC’s Flexible Application and submit all application materials through LSAC. Applicants to the three-year joint JD/MBA program must apply through the following website: https://www.chicagobooth.edu/programs/online-application and follow the instructions available on that website.

LSAC will transmit the completed JD application directly to the Law School. Applicants to the JD program must complete the following steps.

  • REGISTER FOR AND TAKE THE LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION TEST (LSAT), GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION (GRE), OR GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSION TEST (GMAT) (if applicable).

Applicants must submit the LSAT, GRE, or GMAT as part of the Law School's pilot program. For submitting the GMAT, please see the below details. The Law School is accepting the LSAT-Flex, GRE General Test at Home, and GMAT Online Exam to satisfy the standardized test requirement. For submitting the GMAT Online Exam, please see the below details.

You must have a LSAT, GRE, or GMAT score earned within the last five years on file before the Admissions Committee will evaluate your application. See the instructions on the websites of LSAC (for LSAT), Educational Testing Service (for GRE) and Graduate Management Admission Council (for GMAT) for more information on what constitutes a score earned within the last five years.

LSAT: Submit LSAT scores to the Law School through LSAC. If you have taken the LSAT more than one time, you must submit all scores. The Law School will consider all LSAT scores, but we will rely primarily on the highest score and we do not average your scores.

Early Decision applicants and applicants to the Chicago Law Scholars Program must take the LSAT no later than the November administration.

GRE: Submit GRE scores to the Law School by designating the University of Chicago Law School as a recipient using Educational Testing Service (ETS) code 2577. If you have taken the GRE more than one time, you must submit all scores within the last five years.

GMAT: If you are currently enrolled in a graduate program at the University of Chicago and wish to pursue a dual degree in law with the University of Chicago Law School or if you are concurrently applying to pursue a dual degree with the University of Chicago Law School and a graduate program in another University of Chicago division, you may submit a GMAT score (including GMAT Online Exam scores) in lieu of the LSAT or GRE. Submit GMAT scores to the Law School by designating the applicable program: (1) The Law School – JD/MBA Booth School of Business Joint Degree (code H9X-2D-54), (2) The Law School – JD/MPP Harris School of Public Policy (code H9X-2D-58), or (3) The Law School – Joint Degree Programs (code H9X-2D-32). If you have taken the GMAT more than one time, you must submit all scores earned within the last five years.

NOTE: If you take the LSAT in addition to the GRE or GMAT, we will evaluate all scores and report the highest LSAT score to the American Bar Association. If you are admitted to the Law School based on your GRE or GMAT score and, after admission, take the LSAT, the Admissions Committee will evaluate your new score and re-evaluate your offer of admission .

  • REGISTER WITH THE CREDENTIAL ASSEMBLY SERVICE (CAS).

Applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) to submit undergraduate and graduate school transcripts and letters of recommendation. You must submit all undergraduate and graduate school transcripts and all letters of recommendation through the CAS. Do not send these materials directly to the Law School. The CAS will not release a report to the Law School until you have paid all necessary fees, submitted the Flexible Application, and submitted all required materials.

The University of Chicago requires all applicants who are not U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) unless the applicant has studied in full-time status for at least one academic year, within five years preceding the date of his or her application, in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, the Caribbean countries of Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, or English-medium universities in Canada or South Africa. Students who have studied in English in other countries are not exempt from the TOEFL or IELTS requirement and must submit either a TOEFL or IELTS score with the application. For more information on the required language proficiency levels and minimum TOEFL and IELTS scores accepted by the University of Chicago, please review the following website: https://internationalaffairs.uchicago.edu/page/english-language-requirements.

If you need to submit a TOEFL score, contact the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be sent to LSAC. LSAC's TOEFL code for the CAS is 8395. If you need to submit an IELTS score, contact the test center where you took the IELTS and request that your test scores be sent electronically to LSAC through the IELTS system.

Please direct questions about the CAS to LSAC at 215.968.1001 or [email protected] .

  • COMPLETE ALL SECTIONS OF THE FLEXIBLE APPLICATION AND UPLOAD ALL REQUIRED MATERIALS.

Applicants to the JD program must select the 2021 JD Application. Applicants must use the LSAC electronic Flexible Application available at LSAC.org . Do not send a paper copy of your application or any paper materials. Paper materials will be discarded (including letters of recommendation).

Application and Required Materials

Please complete each section of questions in the Flexible Application. If you are applying Regular Decision, you do not need to complete the Early Decision section**. LSAC will transmit the application and all supplemental materials directly to the Law School.

Required Materials:

Résumé. Your résumé should describe your educational history, academic honors and experiences, extracurricular and community activities, and any full or part-time work experience. Please indicate the number of hours per week spent on each activity or job, and include approximate dates for each activity. Make sure your résumé is current at the time you submit your application. If your work has been interrupted for more than a normal vacation period, describe your activities during that time either in your résumé or in a separate addendum. Your résumé may be more than one page.

Personal Statement. The personal statement is your opportunity to introduce yourself to the Admissions Committee and to help the Admissions Committee get to know you on a personal level. It should demonstrate your potential contribution to the Law School community beyond simply academics and should demonstrate your ability to communicate your thoughts effectively. The Admissions Committee generally finds a statement focusing on a unique personal attribute or experience is the most informative (as opposed to a restatement of your qualifications or résumé). While there is no page or word limit on the personal statement, the Admissions Committee values clear and concise written communication skills. The Admissions Committee typically finds that 2-4 pages is a sufficient length for most personal statements.

Character and Fitness Statements. If you answer “yes” to any of the Character and Fitness questions, you must upload an addendum describing the circumstances in the Attachments section. An affirmative response to any portion of the Character and Fitness questions will not automatically disqualify a candidate from admission.

Doctoroff Business Leadership Program Statement. If you answer "yes" to the Doctoroff Program question, you must upload an addendum describing why you want to participate in the Doctoroff Program and how earning the Doctoroff Program Certificate will help you achieve your career goals. Please keep your statement of interest to 250 words or less.

Letters of Recommendation. We require two letters of recommendation to complete your file. The maximum number you may submit is four. We prefer at least one letter of recommendation be from an academic recommender (e.g., professor, teacher's assistant, etc.). Submit letters of recommendation through the LSAC CAS. If you plan to submit more than two letters of recommendation and would like the Admissions Committee to hold your application until we have received all of your letters, you must e-mail [email protected] with your request. We do not require a dean's certification.

Transcripts. Provide all undergraduate and graduate school transcripts reflecting a complete history of your undergraduate and graduate performance. Send transcripts through LSAC's CAS.

Optional Materials:

You may submit supplementary addenda to highlight particular topics you wish to bring to our attention. If you have already addressed the below topics in your Personal Statement, you do not need to submit a supplementary addendum on the same subject. The Admissions Committee typically finds that one page or less is a sufficient length for most addenda. Please title addenda appropriately. Examples of supplementary addenda include:

Diversity Statement: Describe how your background or experiences will enhance the diversity of the University of Chicago Law community (e.g., based on your culture, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, ideology, age, socioeconomic status, academic background, employment, or personal experience).

Undergraduate and/or Standardized Test Performance: If you do not think your academic record or standardized test scores accurately reflect your ability to succeed in law school, please tell us why.

COMPLETING YOUR FILE

Your file must be complete before the Law School will review your application and materials. To be considered complete, you must submit a completed application with all required application materials. You may submit your application before you receive your test score or take a standardized test, but your file will not be considered complete until we receive your standardized test score, application, and all required materials. We will send an e-mail notification to you when the application is received and when it is complete. It is your responsibility to monitor the status of your application and ensure we have received all required materials.

After your application is complete, we do not typically accept updates unless (1) the Admissions Committee requests additional materials, (2) your update pertains to the Character and Fitness sections of the application, or (3) your update is necessary to ensure the information you have provided in your application remains truthful and complete. Please use our online status checker and check your e-mail regularly . Please consult www.law.uchicago.edu/checkappstatus for further information.

Interviews: Interviews are conducted only at the invitation of the Admissions Committee. Applicants may not request an interview. Interview invitations will be sent via email. Check your email, including your spam folder, on a regular basis, as applicants who do not accept the invitation to interview within the timeframe specified in the interview invitation will have their application evaluated without an interview. Interviews are conducted via Skype. For more information, please visit www.law.uchicago.edu/interviews .

4. DETERMINE IF YOU WILL BE APPLYING TO THE EARLY DECISION, CHICAGO LAW SCHOLARS, OR REGULAR DECISION PROGRAM.

Program Options

There are three different application programs: Early Decision, Regular Decision, and Chicago Law Scholars (for University of Chicago College students and alumni only). All applicants complete the same application. You will indicate the program for which you are applying on the application. Please pay close attention to the deadline for each program. Early Decision and Chicago Law Scholars applicants will also be required to complete the Early Decision Agreement. Regular Decision applicants should leave the Early Decision Agreement blank**.

Application deadlines:

Chicago Law Scholars: December 1 ****Early Decision: December 1 ****Regular Decision: March 1

Below is a description of each program:

Early Decision

The Early Decision program is appropriate for applicants who are certain the University of Chicago Law School is their first choice. Early Decision applicants must submit the application and all supporting materials by December 1 (note: the November test date is the latest LSAT score the Admissions Committee will consider for Early Decision). The Admissions Committee will not begin evaluating an application until we have received all required materials from LSAC and the application has been marked complete. Early Decision applicants will be notified of the Admissions Committee's decision by the end of December. Applicants admitted through the Early Decision program must commit to attending the Law School and must immediately withdraw all applications at other law schools. Early Decision applicants who are not admitted during the Early Decision cycle may have their applications denied or they may be placed on the waitlist for further review (at which point, admission, if offered, will no longer be binding on the applicant). Please review the Law School’s website to learn more about the Early Decision program.

Regular Decision

Regular Decision applicants must submit the application and all required materials by March 1. The Admissions Committee will not begin evaluating an application until we have received all required materials from LSAC and the application has been marked complete.

We encourage Regular Decision applicants to submit their applications early in the admissions cycle. We read applications on a rolling basis in the order they are completed and will begin extending offers of admission well before the deadline. The Admissions Office will issue decisions on a rolling basis until all applications have received an initial decision. Waiting until later in the cycle to submit your application could put you at a disadvantage in the admissions process.

Please note we will accept applications after the March 1 deadline, but applications received after that date will be considered on a space-available basis only and we strongly encourage you to apply well before the deadline. Applicants taking the LSAT in June or July may still apply, but space will be very limited. On some occasions, we have accepted outstanding applicants into the summer, but it is a small number.

Chicago Law Scholars

The Chicago Law Scholars Program provides an opportunity for current students and alumni of the University of Chicago undergraduate College** to complete the application early and receive an expedited admissions decision by the end of December. Successful applicants will receive a scholarship of at least $150,000 as part of their financial aid package. Applicants to the Chicago Law Scholars Program must submit a completed application and all supporting materials by December 1 (note: the November test date is the latest LSAT score the Admissions Committee will consider for Chicago Law Scholars). Admission under the Chicago Law Scholars Program is binding. Applicants admitted through the Chicago Law Scholars Program must commit to attending the Law School and must immediately withdraw all applications from other law schools. Chicago Law Scholars applicants must complete the Early Decision Agreement with the application and will be bound by the same terms that govern Early Decision admission. Current College students and alumni may apply to the Early Decision program open to all applicants; however, their admission will not be tied to a substantial scholarship as it is in the Chicago Law Scholars program. You can learn more about this program at www.law.uchicago.edu/chicago-law-scholars-program .

  • PAY THE NONREFUNDABLE APPLICATION FEE.

All applicants (except as otherwise noted below) must pay the $85 application fee (U.S. funds only) through LSAC.

If your application fee has been waived because you are (a) a Teach for America participant or alumnus who completed service within the last five years, (b) a current University of Chicago undergraduate student, (c) a Peace Corps participant or alumnus who completed service within the last give years and who provides documentation confirming completion of the 27 month commitment, (d) an AmeriCorps participant or alumnus who completed service within the last five years and who provides a letter from your supervisor confirming at least a 10-month commitment, or (e) serving active duty in the U.S. military, a U.S. military veteran, or a member of the U.S. Reserves or National Guard, please do not pay the application fee through LSAC (we will not be able to issue a refund if you pay the fee) . You must contact [email protected] to request a fee waiver code before submitting your application. Enter your fee waiver code when you are asked to pay the application fee. We will automatically extend application fee waivers to applicants granted a fee waiver from LSAC (these individuals will not need a fee waiver code from the Law School).

6 New York University Instructions

JD ADMISSIONS INFORMATION AND APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS - NEW YORK UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW

Dear Applicant:

We are genuinely pleased that you have chosen to apply to the New York University School of Law. We know that applying to law school can be a challenge. We understand the limitations involved when describing oneself in writing and the effort the application process requires.

You can be confident that your efforts are worthwhile. In a highly selective admissions process such as ours, many factors can influence the eventual decision on each application. We encourage you to include whatever information you think we need to reach a thoughtful decision in your case.

Finally, consider participating in one of our many events designed to help you engage directly with members of our community and to learn more about the Law School. Applicants who participate in these events generally come to a better understanding of the Law School's atmosphere, intellectual climate, student-faculty interaction, and all of the other intangible elements that are so important in your decision as to which law school to attend.

We look forward to receiving your application.

Cassandra T. Williams

Assistant Dean for Admissions

GENERAL INFORMATION AND STANDARDS FOR ADMISSION

NYU Law strives to ensure that the students in each incoming class bring with them a diversity of experiences. All individuals, regardless of background, are encouraged to apply.

All applicants must be at least eighteen years old and hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university or its international equivalent to be eligible to enroll in the Juris Doctor (JD) program. Students matriculate in the fall semester on a full-time basis only.

When to Apply--Admission 2021

Early Decision (Binding)

File and complete application by November 15

Notification by late December

If you wish to be considered for Early Decision admission, your application, Early Decision Contract, and all supporting materials, must be complete by November 15. Applicants who wish to be considered for Early Decision admission must take the LSAT or GRE no later than October 2020. (Note, all references in the JD Application Instructions to LSAT/GRE include LSAT/LSAT-Flex and GRE/GRE General Test at Home.)

Applicants who apply for Early Decision but do not meet the Early Decision deadline will automatically have their applications considered for regular admission.

Admission during Early Decision is binding on applicants. You must indicate your intention to apply for Early Decision on your application, and you must submit the Early Decision Contract which is a separate form. You may not apply for another binding early decision program. If admitted, you must commit to enroll at NYU School of Law and immediately withdraw all applications at other law schools regardless of your status. Failure to honor these commitments will result in New York University School of Law revoking its offer of admission. As an Early Decision applicant, you will be informed by the end of December whether your application has been accepted, denied, or held for further review. If your application is held, it will be considered again in the Regular Decision cycle.

File and complete application by February 15

Notification by late April

Applicants who complete applications by February 15 will receive decisions - admit, deny, or waitlist - by late April. Your LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) report must be complete and ready to be requested by our office no later than February 15.

If your application is not complete by February 15, we will try to respond within 12 weeks of its completion, but we cannot guarantee a decision by a particular date.

Applicants who wish to be considered for Early Decision admission must take the LSAT or GRE no later than October 2020. All other applicants must take the LSAT or GRE no later than January 2021. The oldest LSAT score we will accept is from the June 2015 LSAT administration.

Final decisions for some of those placed on the waitlist may not be made until late summer.

Applicants who wish to be considered for the following scholarship programs should complete their applications by January 1 and should have a complete CAS report ready to be requested by our office no later than January 1: AnBryce Scholarship, ASPIRE Scholarship, Furman Public Policy Scholarship, Latinx Rights Scholarship, Leadership Program in Law & Business or Law and Social Entrepreneurship, and the Root-Tilden-Kern Public Interest Scholarship Program. Applicants must take the LSAT or GRE no later than November 2020.

Applicants who wish to be considered for the Furman Academic Scholarship should complete their applications by January 15 and should have a complete CAS report ready to be requested by our office no later than January 15. Applicants must take the LSAT or GRE no later than November 2020.

Standards for Admission

The admission process is highly selective and seeks to enroll men and women of exceptional ability. Over 8,000 individuals from all 50 states and several non-US countries applied for the fall 2020 entering class. In recent years, more than 400 schools have been represented in the applicant pool. Approximately 70 percent of recent applicants graduated from college at least one year before applying to NYU School of Law; about 10 percent graduated more than five years before applying.

The majority of applicants present credentials that suggest they would succeed academically. The Committee on Admissions selects those candidates it considers to have the very strongest combination of qualifications and the very greatest potential to contribute to the NYU School of Law community and the legal profession. The Committee bases its decisions on factors including, but not limited to, intellectual potential, academic achievement, character, community involvement, and work experience. In selecting the class, the Committee on Admissions considers a candidate's ability to contribute diverse perspectives to interactions in the classroom.

An applicant's undergraduate record and standardized test score(s), though important criteria, are not the sole determinants for admission. There are no combinations of grades and scores that assure admission or denial.

The Committee on Admissions makes decisions after considering all the information in an application. It reviews the undergraduate transcript closely, with attention to such factors as trends in the applicant's grades, class rank, the ratio of pass/fail to graded courses, the diversity and depth of course work, and the length of time since graduation. Factors other than undergraduate grades and standardized test scores may be particularly significant for applicants who have experienced educational or socioeconomic disadvantage. The Committee evaluates work experience and extracurricular and community activity for evidence of advancement, leadership, and capacity for assuming responsibility. A recommendation letter is particularly valuable when the writer provides substantive information about the applicant's abilities, activities, and personal qualities. Since the Committee does not interview candidates as part of its initial review, the personal statement provides an opportunity for the applicant to supplement the information provided in the application.

Timing of Decisions

A holistic approach to the review of applications requires an extraordinary amount of care, and thus a significant amount of time. There is no way to predict an exact date on which a candidate will receive a decision.

Candidates who apply under the binding Early Decision option (deadline November 15) will be notified (admit, deny, or hold) by late December.

Candidates who apply by our regular February 15 deadline will be notified by late April. Candidates may hear sooner than late April, but we cannot make such a guarantee.

The Committee on Admissions recognizes that some law schools have deposit deadlines as early as April 1 and will ask a candidate for a commitment before that candidate receives a decision from NYU School of Law. Unfortunately, it is not possible for us to accelerate our process in these circumstances.

Rolling Notification, Not Rolling Admission

Applications are sent to the Committee on Admissions in the order in which they are completed, but decisions are not necessarily made in the order in which applications are first reviewed. Some applicants may receive a decision fairly quickly based on the overall and relative strength of the application.

In an applicant pool of approximately 8,000 applications, many candidates present strong qualifications. The Law School's admission process is both objective and comparative. The Committee follows an ongoing process of reviewing and rereviewing the vast majority of the applicant pool. Most candidates' applications require significant comparison with the applicant pool as a whole before a final decision can be reached. For many candidates, the Committee is not able to reach a decision until they have a clear picture of that year's entire applicant pool.

As long as candidates take the LSAT or GRE by January and meet the February 15 deadline, they will be given full and complete consideration and will be at no competitive disadvantage in the admission process.

PARTS OF THE APPLICATION

Note: Please DO NOT send duplicate materials to NYU School of Law.

(1) Application Form

Please follow the directions carefully and include the requested information in the spaces provided. You may also upload various attachments to your application as outlined in the attachment section of the application. Please note that if any one of the attachments outlined does not apply to you, please check the box within each section that says "this does not apply to me." Please do not submit attachments in lieu of completing the requested information in each section of the application . Please label clearly all attachments at the top or header of the attachment.

(2) Standardized Test Score(s) and CAS Report

All applicants for admission to the JD program are required to take either the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) or the GRE. Scores for both exams are valid for five years. NYU Law requires applicants to report all valid LSAT and GRE scores that they have received. Applicants have a continuing obligation to provide all test scores up until the time of law school matriculation. (Note, all references in the JD Application instructions to LSAT/GRE include LSAT/LSAT-Flex and GRE/GRE General Test at Home.)

All applicants are required to register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). After your application is received electronically, a request for your CAS report from the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) is automatically generated. The CAS report summarizes your undergraduate academic work and includes copies of your transcripts. If you have taken the LSAT, your LSAT score(s) and your LSAT writing sample(s) will be included in the CAS report.The LSAT writing sample is required for all applicants who submit a LSAT. GRE scores must be sent to NYU Law directly from ETS. The law school code for NYU School of Law for both LSAC and ETS is 2599.

(3) Recommendation Forms

Two recommendations are required to complete your application.

The Committee on Admissions requires the use of the LSAC Letter of Recommendation (LOR) Service. Please DO NOT submit duplicate letters directly to NYU School of Law.

Note: The Root-Tilden-Kern Scholarship; the Lindemann Family Public Service Scholarship; the Jacobson Public Service Scholarship for Women, Children, and Families; the Sinsheimer Service Scholarship; the Filomen M. D'Agostino Scholarship for Women and Children; and the Filomen M. D'Agostino Scholarship for Civil Rights, Civil Liberties, and Criminal Justice applications require at least one recommendation that addresses the applicant's commitment to public service (see Scholarship section for details).

(4) Application Fee or Waiver

When you transmit your application electronically, the fee, payable by credit card only, is $85. The application fee is not applied to tuition and is not refundable.

Applicants who have received an LSAC-approved LSAT or Credential Assembly Service fee waiver will have their NYU School of Law $85 application fee automatically waived.

Applicants who are alumni of Teach for America or the Peace Corps are eligible for an $85 application fee waiver. To qualify, applicants must have completed their 2-year commitment to Teach for America or the Peace Corps by the start of the fall semester. Further, Teach for America alumni must have completed TFA's pre-corps training institute and served as a teacher for two years in a low-income community through their Teach for America placement. Applicants who have completed less than 2 years by the start of law school or those who are just entering Teach for America or the Peace Corps are not eligible.

The application fee also will be waived for those who have served or are serving in the United States military. (Participation in a foreign country's military does not qualify an applicant for a fee waiver.)

Teach for America, Peace Corps, and US military participants should send their request for a fee waiver to [email protected] . Applicants must have an account with the LSAC. To request an application fee waiver, please include your L number, a verification letter as well as the basis for the waiver (Teach for America, Peace Corps, or US military service).

(5) Personal Statement

While the Committee on Admissions does not use interviews as part of the regular selection process, we would like to give you the opportunity to include more information about yourself than the application form conveys. Because people and their interests vary, we leave the content and length of your statement to your discretion. You may wish to complete or clarify your responses to items on the application form, bring to our attention additional information you feel should be considered, describe important or unusual aspects of yourself not otherwise apparent in your application, or tell us what led you to apply to the NYU School of Law.

A resume is required to complete your application.

(7) Supplying Additional Information

The Committee on Admissions encourages you to provide any information that may be helpful to us in reaching a thoughtful decision on your application. While the choice as to whether and what information to submit to the Committee is entirely yours, any information you provide will be used to give you full credit for your accomplishments, to help the Committee reach an informed decision on your application, and to aid the Committee in selecting a diverse student body.

Information that has been helpful in the past includes, but is not limited to, descriptions or documentation of disabilities, a history of performance on standardized tests, an explanation for any discrepancies in the case of submission of multiple standardized test scores, unusual circumstances that may have affected academic performance, or personal/family history of educational or socioeconomic disadvantage. This list is not all-inclusive, but we offer it for you to think about as you consider whether such information might be relevant in your application, and to assure you that it is quite appropriate.

If you choose to provide additional information, please upload this information in the attachment section of the application and clearly identify your submission accordingly.

When you receive additional grades (such as first semester or senior year grades), you are required to submit an updated transcript to LSAC, which will, in turn, send us an updated CAS report.

Any information you submit, including material sent after your application is complete, will be considered by the Committee on Admissions if received before a final decision is reached on your application.

In completing this application, be sure that your statements are accurate, you answer all questions in the Character and Fitness section of the application, and you electronically certify the application by completing the Certification section of the application. Misrepresentation may result in denial of admission, the rescinding of an offer of admission, dismissal from the Law School, or revoking any NYU School of Law degrees granted. Misrepresentation also may result in notification of LSAC's Subcommittee on Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process. The Law School may seek to verify any information submitted by contacting recommenders, employers, or school officials.

In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

Questions or Concerns

We will try to notify you if any of the material necessary to complete your application has not been received by the Office of Admissions, and we will try to keep you informed about the status of your application. Please understand that it takes some time for the Committee to give each application thorough consideration.

Please note that we have an online status check function available for all applicants accessible at http://www.law.nyu.edu/jdadmissions.

Please keep a copy of your application and your personal statement. We will not return or give you copies of any part of your application or supporting material, nor will we forward any part of your application or supporting material to a third party.

The Office of Admissions does not release any information about an applicant's status to anyone except the applicant. This policy helps to protect the confidentiality of every applicant.

If an applicant is admitted to the Law School, the applicant's contact information, including email and phone number, will be shared with community members such as Law School faculty, alumni, administrators, students, and student organizations, including affinity groups, to facilitate the exchange of information about NYU Law. Applicants who do not wish their contact information to be shared with members of the NYU Law community should contact the Office of JD Admissions at [email protected] .

Application materials and all supporting documents submitted in connection with an application for admitted students who enroll at New York University School of Law become part of the student's record and are subject to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

For applicants in the European Union please see the Data Privacy Notice for Prospective Students in the E.U.

REAPPLICATION TO THE JD PROGRAM

To reapply you must:

  • Complete the fall 2021 application (including a personal statement and two letters of recommendation).
  • Pay the $85 application fee or submit a valid fee waiver.
  • Register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) provides its service to applicants for five years requiring a $45 per report fee to have the CAS report sent to NYU School of Law. For more information, contact LSAC.org .
  • Send updated transcripts to LSAC for all academic work - undergraduate, graduate, and/or professional - undertaken since your last application.
  • Submit all valid scores received for both the LSAT and GRE; LSAT scores will be included in the CAS report; the LSAT writing sample is required for all applicants who submit an LSAT. GRE scores must be sent directly to NYU from ETS. The school code for NYU School of Law is 2599.

INTERNATIONALLY-EDUCATED APPLICANTS

International transcripts must be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) for the evaluation of international transcripts if:

  • All post-secondary work was completed outside of the US (including its territories) or Canada, OR
  • An applicant was directly enrolled at an institution located outside of the US (including its territories) or Canada and the total amount of work completed at all such institutions combined is the equivalent of more than one year of post-secondary study in the US (including its territories) or Canada. Please note that if an applicant has completed one year or less of post-secondary study at an institution located outside of the US (including its territories) or Canada, and the work was not completed through a study abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a US or Canadian institution where the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript, then the applicant may have an official copy of that transcript sent directly to NYU School of Law, Office of JD Admissions, at [email protected] u or at139 MacDougal Street, New York, New York 10012.

Please visit LSAC.org for details.

ADVANCED STANDING APPLICANTS

If you wish to apply for admission with advanced standing after having completed at least one year in another ABA accredited law school, you may apply online for transfer or third-year visiting/nonmatriculated admission. DO NOT complete this application.

FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS

Admission decisions are made without regard to an applicant's financial resources, and financial aid applications are reviewed only for students who have been admitted.

Similarly, applicants are reviewed for all scholarship programs only after being admitted. Applicants should follow the application procedures described below in order to be considered for scholarships. Admitted students must complete the NYU Law Financial Aid Application in order to be considered for any Law School scholarship including merit-based and need-based scholarships and/or to apply for some loan programs.

All applicants for financial aid should file a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) as early in the year as possible. The Title IV (FAFSA) code number for NYU is 002785.

DEAN'S SCHOLARSHIPS

Each year, in addition to the scholarship programs listed in the scholarship section of the application, Dean's Scholarship Awards, which are merit- and/or need-based grants in amounts up to full tuition, are granted to students on the basis of outstanding academic achievement, intellectual potential, and/or financial need. The majority of our scholarships are Dean's awards.

All students admitted to NYU School of Law are considered for Dean's Scholarships through the financial aid process. Admitted students must complete the NYU Law Financial Aid Application in order to be considered for Dean's Scholarships.

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS

NYU offers a variety of scholarships in amounts up to full tuition. Offering more than financial support, they provide fully integrated academic and professional programs. If you wish to apply for the AnBryce Scholarship, the ASPIRE Scholarship, the Furman Academic Scholars Program, the Furman Public Policy Scholarship, the Latinx Rights Scholarship, the Leadership Program in Law and Business or Law and Social Entrepreneurship, or the Root-Tilden-Kern Public Interest Scholarship Program, you are required to complete the scholarship section of the application.

Applicants who wish to be considered for the following scholarship programs should complete their admissions applications by January 1 and should have a complete CAS report ready to be requested by our office no later than January 1 : AnBryce Scholarship, ASPIRE Scholarship, Furman Public Policy Scholarship, Latinx Rights Scholarship, Leadership Program in Law & Business and Law and Social Entrepreneurship, and the Root-Tilden-Kern Public Interest Scholarship Program.

Applicants who wish to be considered for the Furman Academic Scholarship should complete their admissions applications by January 15 and should have a complete CAS report ready to be requested by our office no later than January 15 .

Please note that each scholarship requires that you submit additional information including, for example, an additional essay or letter of recommendation. All applicants to scholarship programs must take the LSAT or GRE no later than November 2020. For detailed information on the application requirements for each of the scholarship programs listed, please visit http://www.law.nyu.edu/financialaid/jdscholarships.

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY

New York University is committed to a policy of equal treatment and opportunity in every aspect of its relations with its faculty, students, and staff members, without regard to race, creed, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender and/or gender identity or expression, marital or parental status, national origin, ethnicity, citizenship status, veteran or military status, age, disability, and any other legally protected basis.

Inquiries regarding the application of federal laws and regulations concerning affirmative action and antidiscrimination policies and procedures at New York University may be referred to Mary Signor, Executive Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 726 Broadway, Rm 721, New York, NY 10003. Ms. Signor also serves as the University's Title IX coordinator (equal opportunity without regard to gender), Title VI coordinator (equal opportunity without regard to race, color, or national origin), and Section 504 coordinator (equal opportunity for disabled persons). She may be contacted via telephone at 212.998.2370.

7 University of Pennsylvania Instructions

Application Instructions:

University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School Office of Admissions and Financial Aid 3501 Sansom Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-6204 215.898.7400 (phone) http://www.law.upenn.edu/; [email protected] ; [email protected]

FIRST YEAR JD ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION

We welcome your interest in the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School (Penn Carey Law) and provide this information to guide you through the admissions and financial aid processes.

Applicant Eligibility Requirements

All applicants must hold a bachelor's degree to be eligible to enroll in the first year Juris Doctor (JD) program. Applicants who are admitted to the JD program are admitted for the fall on a full-time basis only. We do not have spring admission or a part-time program. All applicants must take an approved standardized test (either the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)) and must register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). (See Test Administration and LSAC Credential Assembly Service information below.)

The admissions process at Penn Carey Law is highly selective. Last year, we received over 6,000 applications for the approximately 250 places in the first-year class. Students who apply to Penn Carey Law come from every state in the nation, from many countries around the world, from more than 200 undergraduate institutions, and from a broad range of academic, ethnic, cultural, professional, and economic backgrounds.

There is no pre-law educational requirement or even a specific recommended course of study for admission to Penn Carey Law. Strength of character, breadth of knowledge, and intellectual maturity constitute the base upon which our legal education builds. As such, Penn Carey Law seeks to enroll individuals who have demonstrated outstanding academic success, who are intellectually curious, and who possess superior writing, oral communication, and analytical skills. Importantly, we also seek individuals who will positively contribute to the Penn Carey Law community, and ultimately, to the legal profession, based on their diverse backgrounds, their personal and professional experiences, and any challenges or obstacles that they may have overcome.

The Admissions Committee considers numerous factors in the admissions process, including the student's academic record, course selection and grade trends, standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, leadership, community service, extracurricular activities, professional and life experiences, and the applicant's examples of written expression (the standardized test writing sample, personal statement, and optional essays). Importantly, the Admissions Committee bases its decision on all material submitted on behalf of each candidate. Though an applicant's academic record and standardized test score are significant factors in the review process, they are not the sole factors. We do not have numerical "cut-offs" in the application process nor do we employ the use of an admissions index.

The Admissions Committee does not grant evaluative interviews as part of the review process. However, we invite all applicants to become more familiar with the Law School, the University campus, and Philadelphia by attending one of our virtual Information Sessions which are offered at various times throughout the year. If you are interested in attending an information session, please check our website for schedules: https://www.law.upenn.edu/admissions/visiting/.

Application Deadlines

Submit application by November 15* Complete application by December 1 Receive decision by December 31

Submit application by January 7* Complete application by January 15 Receive decision by January 31

*Early Decision applications must be submitted through LSAC no later than November 15 for Round 1 or January 7 for Round 2. All supporting documents, including the LSAC Credential Assembly Service Report, must be received by December 1 for Round 1 or January 15 for Round 2 Early Decision consideration.

Please be advised that once an Early Decision application is deemed complete, the application could immediately go to the Admissions Committee for review, regardless of Round 1 or Round 2 submission. Therefore, a decision could be made at any point and will be considered binding once made.

Submit application by March 1

Complete application by March 15 Receive decision by May 1

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis beginning in November and decisions are made beginning in December. Therefore, it is advised that you submit your application earlier in the cycle rather than later.

Penn Carey Law's Early Decision option is designed for applicants who have thoroughly researched their law school options and determined that Penn Carey Law is clearly their first choice, regardless of financial considerations. Penn Carey Law's Early Decision program is binding. Applicants who wish to be considered for Early Decision must commit to matriculate at Penn Carey Law if admitted. If admitted, you must withdraw your applications from all other law schools and refrain from initiating new applications. Applicants who apply through the Early Decision program may apply to other law schools but may not have more than one binding Early Decision application pending simultaneously. If a binding Early Decision application has been submitted to another school, applicants may apply through Penn Carey Law's Early Decision program only if and when they are released from their binding terms at the other school.

If you are interested in applying for Early Decision, please select the Early Decision Admission, Round 1 or Round 2 option under Type of Application in the Application Data section of the Application Questions. Also, you must print and physically sign the Early Decision Agreement from Forms. You can then upload the signed Early Decision Agreement to Attachments before transmission of your application through LSAC. If you are not able to upload the signed Early Decision Agreement to Attachments, it can be emailed directly to the Office of Admissions. The Early Decision Agreement must be physically signed.

Penn Carey Law's Early Decision option allows applicants to receive a decision—admit, deny, or hold for further consideration—by the end of December for Round 1 and by the end of January for Round 2. For Round 1, Early Decision applicants must take an approved standardized test no later than October of the application year and submit the application by November 15. For Round 2, Early Decision applicants must take an approved standardized test no later than December of the application year and submit the application by January 7. Additionally, the Office of Admissions must receive all required supporting documents, including the LSAC Credential Assembly Service report and letters of recommendation, by December 1 for Round 1 and by January 15 for Round 2.

Applicants who choose to apply for Early Decision Round 1 but are unable to complete their application by December 1, may request their application be considered for Early Decision Round 2, keeping in mind that they may not have more than one binding Early Decision application pending simultaneously with another law school as stated above. A request to rollover from Early Decision Round 1 to Early Decision Round 2 must be submitted in writing by email to the Office of Admissions. Otherwise, Early Decision Round 1 applicants who are unable to complete their application by December 1 will be reviewed as regular admissions applicants. Early Decision Round 2 applicants who are unable to complete their application by January 15 will be reviewed as regular admissions applicants. An applicant's decision will no longer be binding if accepted through the regular admissions process.

Early Decision applicants who are held for further consideration, whether in Round 1 or Round 2, will be reevaluated during the regular admissions process. After being held for further consideration, an applicant's decision will no longer be binding if accepted through the regular admissions process.

Applicants who submit applications for Regular Decision by March 1 and complete applications by March 15 will receive a decision—admit, deny, hold for further consideration, or waitlist—by May 1. We suggest Regular Decision applicants should take an approved standardized test no later than December of the application year due to our rolling admissions but we will accept approved standardized test scores for any tests administered before February 28, 2021.

How to Apply

We require you to submit an application using the LSAC electronic application (with electronic submission through LSAC), available at LSAC.org .

Application Requirements and Instructions

Please provide complete information for each question on the application in the spaces provided. You may attach additional pages (as an upload in Attachments) to complete or elaborate on this information. Please answer all questions fully and accurately. A copy of your law school application will be retained for a minimum period of three years. For those students who matriculate, a copy of your application will be sent to the Committee on Character and Fitness when you apply to take a state bar examination or seek admission to the bar. Please be advised that there are character, fitness and other qualifications for admission to the bar and that as an applicant, prior to matriculation, you should determine what those requirements are in the state(s) in which you intend to practice. More information is available at the National Conference of Bar Examiners: http://www.ncbex.org/.

The application fee is $80 (nonrefundable). You must pay the application fee by debit or credit card when you submit your application through LSAC. When you pay the application fee through LSAC, you will also sign your application with the electronic signature option. Applicants may be eligible for one of the fee waiver programs described below. Please do not pay the application fee if you are requesting a fee waiver. We will not refund the application fee.

Penn Carey Law Fee Waiver Application

If submitting the application fee will cause undue financial hardship, you may request a need-based fee waiver directly from Penn Carey Law. You must submit the Penn Carey Law Fee Waiver Application directly to Penn Carey Law and be approved before you transmit the LSAC Electronic Application through LSAC.** If you are granted a fee waiver, you will be emailed a fee waiver coupon number. The fee waiver coupon number can be entered on the payment page once you select to transmit your application through LSAC.

The Penn Carey Law Fee Waiver Application (located on our website at https://www.law.upenn.edu/admissions/jd/how-to-apply.php and the fee waiver supporting documentation can be emailed to [email protected] . For the fee waiver supporting documentation, you must submit a copy of your most recent tax return (not W2 forms), a copy of a recent pay stub, and an itemized list of monthly expenses if you are not currently enrolled in an academic program. If you are presently in school, you must submit a copy of your financial aid award letter (not your financial aid transcript).

LSAC Fee Waivers

If LSAC has granted you an LSAC Fee Waiver for the LSAT and Credential Assembly Service, you do not need to submit the Penn Carey Law Fee Waiver Application or notify us in any other way. Since Penn Carey Law is a participating school, candidates who receive a fee waiver from LSAC will automatically receive an application fee waiver from Penn Carey Law. When you transmit your Penn Carey Law application, you will be prompted to electronically sign your application but you will not be prompted for payment information.

Service Recognition Fee Waivers: AmeriCorps, Peace Corps, Teach For America, Teach For China, and the United States Military

In recognition of your service, all past and present members of AmeriCorps, Peace Corps, Teach For America, Teach for China, and the United States Military are eligible for an application fee waiver. You must request this service recognition fee waiver from Penn Carey Law before you transmit the electronic application through LSAC as we will not refund the application fee.** To apply, please complete the Service Recognition Fee Waiver Application .

Once your participation in the designated service organization has been verified, you will be emailed a fee waiver coupon number. The fee waiver coupon number can be entered on the payment page once you select to transmit your application through LSAC. Please make sure to note your service appointment on your résumé.

Merit Fee Waivers

Merit-based fee waivers are made available through queries to the LSAC Candidate Referral Service (CRS), ETS, and GMAC using various criteria which we do not disclose; we do not grant them following individual requests. For merit-based fee waiver consideration, please make sure you have opted-in for the CRS; registered with the Credential Assembly Service; have at least one approved standardized test score on file, and have a processed undergraduate degree-school transcript at LSAC. Our fee waiver emails are sent periodically throughout the application cycle, starting in early September and continuing through February.

Test Administration and LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

Every applicant must take an approved standardized test, either the LSAT, GRE, or GMAT, and must register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) through LSAC. You may register for the LSAT and/or the Credential Assembly Service online at LSAC.org or by phone at 215.968.1001. For the GRE and GMAT, you must arrange for an official test score report to be released to Penn Carey Law; we will not accept test taker copies of score reports. You may register for the GRE here ; Penn Carey Law’s school code for GRE score reporting is 4122. You may register for the GMAT here ; Penn Carey Law’s school code for GMAT score reporting is G56-RV-81. Please make sure that you look for the Law School name and not just the University; they are two different recipients.

We will accept approved standardized test scores from any test administration taken within the last five years prior to the current application cycle, i.e., June 2015 or thereafter for the class entering in fall 2021. Standardized tests taken before June 2015 do not need to be reported. In view of our March 15 deadline to complete your file and the length of time needed for processing your application materials, we suggest approved standardized tests should be taken no later than December 2020, but we will accept approved standardized test scores for any tests administered before February 28, 2021. We will not accept any standardized tests taken after February 28, 2021.

We require that all test scores, taken June 1, 2015 or after, be submitted as part of your application. Applicants may not choose which test results they will share or report. For example, if you have a reportable LSAT and GRE score, you must report both test scores. If you take an approved standardized test more than once, all scores must be reported in your application if taken within the last five years and will be considered. At its discretion, the Admissions Committee may evaluate your application based on the highest score. If there are circumstances that you believe affected your performance on a test, we encourage you to attach an additional statement with your application (see Optional Essays) explaining those circumstances. In addition, if you choose to retake an approved standardized test, up to February 28, 2021, after submitting your application, you must notify us in writing if you would like your application to be held from committee review until the new test score is received. We will not automatically hold your file from review for receipt of a future test score if you just list on the application that you are taking a future test.

Each applicant must also register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) and arrange to have all transcripts sent to LSAC from each college or university attended. When we receive your application, we will automatically request your CAS report, and LSAC will transmit it electronically to us. The CAS report includes your LSAT score(s) and LSAT writing sample(s) if you have taken the LSAT, copies of your academic transcript(s), an undergraduate academic summary, letters of recommendation, and other information. Please note that your CAS report will NOT be released by LSAC until all required transcripts have been received and processed by LSAC. Once we receive your initial CAS report, we will automatically receive CAS update reports (e.g. new transcripts, new LSAT scores, new letters of recommendation etc.).

Penn Carey Law requires that any international transcripts be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service for applicants who completed any post-secondary work outside the US (including its territories) or Canada. You must use this service for the evaluation of your international transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is if you completed the international work through a study-abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a US or Canadian institution, the program was no longer than one year in length, and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. This service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration fee. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your CAS report.

To use the Credential Assembly Service, log in to your online LSAC account and follow the instructions for registering for the service. Be sure to print out a Transcript Request Form for each institution and send it promptly to them. More time is usually required to receive international transcripts.

Applicants are reminded to monitor their LSAC account to ensure that the account is current so that their CAS report will be released to us on a timely basis. CAS reports are released to Penn Carey Law when all transcripts, at least two letters of recommendation, and an LSAT score and LSAT writing sample (unless only applying with GRE and/or GMAT scores) are received. In addition, all applicable fees must be paid to LSAC in order for a CAS report to be released.

Recommendation Forms and Letters

Penn Carey Law requires that you submit your letters through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. Your CAS report will not be released to Penn Carey Law until at least two letters of recommendation are on file with LSAC and targeted to Penn Carey Law. This service is included with your Credential Assembly Service registration. You must use the letter of recommendation form available online through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service for each letter submitted to LSAC. **Please do not send letters directly to Penn Carey Law, unless directed by the Admissions office.

Letters of recommendation from individuals who can comment on your intellectual capacity and analytical and written communication skills are extremely useful in a rigorous selection process. Therefore, we require two letters of recommendation from individuals who have served as recent academic instructors or advisors. However, if you have been out of school for several years and obtaining academic references will present a hardship, letters from employers or others who have worked closely with you are sufficient. Note that we will accept up to four letters of recommendation; however, your application is deemed complete with two letters of recommendation. We do not hold applications from going out to review for letters of recommendation beyond the required two. Therefore, please make sure your recommenders get your letters of recommendation in to LSAC in a timely fashion.

Character and Fitness Verification

The Admissions Committee requires that every applicant answer questions pertaining to character and fitness. If you answer yes to any of these questions, you must provide an explanation in the space provided on the Application for Admission. We caution you to err on the side of full disclosure as any discrepancies will be investigated and may be reported to LSAC's Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process Subcommittee .

The Admissions Committee requires that every applicant submit an original example of written expression. The purpose of this personal statement is to provide you with an opportunity to submit information that you deem important to your candidacy. You may wish to describe aspects of your background and interests—intellectual, personal and/or professional—and how you will uniquely contribute to the Penn Carey Law community and/or the legal profession. Please try to limit your statement to two pages, double-spaced, as a suggested length. In addition, mark as "Personal Statement" and include your name and LSAC account number on each page.

Optional Essays

If you wish, you may write an additional essay on any of the following topics. These optional essays allow you an opportunity to provide the admissions committee with additional relevant information that you were not able to include in your personal statement. Please include the essay with your application by electronically attaching it to your application before submission through LSAC. You may answer more than one essay topic if you so choose. Include your name and LSAC account number on each page. Please limit any optional essay to one page, double-spaced and title it appropriately.

Describe how your background or experiences will enhance the diversity of the Penn Carey Law community (e.g., based on your culture, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, ideology, age, socioeconomic status, academic background, employment, or personal experience).

These are the core strengths that make Penn Carey Law the best place to receive a rigorous and engaging legal education: genuine integration with associated disciplines; transformative, forward-looking faculty scholarship; highly-regarded experiential learning through urban clinics and our pro bono pledge; innovative, hands-on global engagement; and a manifest commitment to professional development and collegiality. These qualities define Penn Carey Law. What defines you? How do your goals and values match Penn Carey Law’s core strengths?

Describe a time when, as a member of a team, you particularly excelled or were especially frustrated. What was your role within that team? What was the outcome?

If you do not think that your academic record or standardized test scores accurately reflect your ability to succeed in law school, please tell us why.

Applying for Joint-Degree Programs

Penn Carey Law leads in cross-disciplinary education of law students. Every year, a number of our applicants and students apply to more than 20 formal joint-degree programs, either contemporaneously with the Penn Carey Law application or in the first or second year of their law study. Additionally, on an ad hoc basis, students have successfully combined graduate study outside of these formal programs in other graduate and professional schools at the University of Pennsylvania. If you are interested in supplementing your legal education with study at other

programs/schools at the University, we encourage you to discuss that interest with their Admissions Department. Note that you must apply individually to each program; admissions decisions are made by each program independently. You will find a list of most of our available formal joint-degree programs on the Application for Admission. Additionally, detailed information regarding each program may be found on our website at https://www.law.upenn.edu/academics/crossdisciplinary/. If you are applying to another graduate program, or intend to, please provide the information requested in the Application Data section of the Application Questions.

Exception: If you are applying for the three year JD/MBA program, please do not apply through LSAC. Instead, you must apply exclusively through Wharton at http://mba.wharton.upenn.edu/. In the Wharton application, you will find a Law School application supplement in the Program Specific Information section. Please reference the Instructions and Guidelines for JD/MBA Applicants in the Program Information section of the Wharton application for further important information. You may only apply to one of these degree programs per application cycle: either the JD or the three year JD/MBA. Once you have submitted an application for either the JD or the JD/MBA degree program, you cannot switch to the other degree program. You can still apply Early Decision Round 1 or Round 2 for the JD program with the three year JD/MBA application through Wharton.

Application Status/Questions

The Penn Carey Law Office of Admissions is committed to serving our applicants as efficiently and effectively as we can during the application process. We will notify you of the date upon which we receive your application in an email acknowledgment. Please be advised that it may take approximately 2 to 4 weeks from the date that we receive an application to process and evaluate the file for completeness. At that time, we will inform you of any missing required documents if we have received the LSAC CAS report. Please note that we will not evaluate the file for completeness until we receive the CAS report. We will also notify you of the date upon which your application is complete. Once your file is complete, it is put in the queue for the Admissions Committee and files are evaluated on a rolling basis. It is difficult to predict how long your file may be in the review process as your file will be evaluated by several members of the Admissions Committee.

Applicants will be able to check the status of their application at any time using the Application Status Checker , Penn Carey Law's online status checker. To access the online status checker, you can go to our website at https://www.law.upenn.edu/admissions/jd/how-to-apply.php. Please be sure that you have allowed adequate time for your application to be processed, completed, and evaluated before contacting the Office of Admissions to check on the status of your decision. Again, you can always check on the status of your application by accessing the online status checker. Also, if you contact the Office of Admissions, please understand that due to the large volume of applications and supporting documents that we receive, we may not be able to immediately verify whether a specific item has been received and filed with your application. Please keep checking the Application Status Checker to verify receipt of required application documents.

Email Notification

Please note that an email address is required. We communicate via email with applicants regarding the status of their application; thus, it is imperative that you provide an email address on your application and it remains current throughout the admissions process . You will be notified by email when your application is received, again when your application file is completed, and possibly at other times to update you on the status of your application.

Please promptly notify us of any changes to your email address or any changes to your other contact information. Applicants should be aware of their email service provider's procedures for spam filtering that may affect delivery of any email communications sent from the Penn Carey Law Office of Admissions. Steps should be taken to ensure that messages can be delivered promptly.

Reapplication

Applicants who are denied admission may reapply to Penn Carey Law in a subsequent year. It should be noted, however, that candidates are unlikely to be admitted unless there is some significant change since their previous application. Previous applicants who wish to reapply must:

Submit the current application, a new personal statement, and résumé

Submit the $80 application fee

Register with the LSAC Credential Assembly Service if registration is no longer current, and pay for an additional report

Send updated transcript(s) to LSAC for all academic work—undergraduate, graduate, and/or professional—completed since the last application

While not required, we strongly suggest that you submit two new letters of recommendation to replace or supplement previously submitted letters

TUITION AND FINANCIAL AID

Cost of Education (2020-2021)

Tuition $63,610

Technology Fee $1,068

General Fee $3,452

Total $68,130

Living Expenses Budget (2020-2021)

Room and Board $16,570

Books $2,000

Health Insurance $3,734

Health Clinical Fee $630

Miscellaneous $2,004

Transportation $984

Grand Total $94,052

The General Fee is a partial contribution toward the support of the Student Health Service, graduate student activities, recreational facilities, the physical development of the University, and other services not directly associated with specific courses. The Trustees reserve the right at any time to amend the regulations concerning tuition, fees, and method of payment and to make such changes applicable to students currently enrolled in the University as well as to new students. Tuition and fees are adjusted annually. The living expenses estimate will vary according to personal lifestyles.

Applying for Financial Aid

It is the policy of Penn Carey Law, insofar as possible, to assist deserving students with their legal education by reducing the burden of financial pressures. Financial assistance is available to qualifying applicants in the form of need-based aid (grants), merit scholarships, public interest scholarships, the Toll Public Interest Loan Repayment Assistance Program, and federal and private student loans. Admission decisions at Penn Carey Law are made without regard to an applicant's financial need. Therefore, financial aid applications are reviewed only after a student has been admitted.

If you are interested in applying for need-based aid, complete the requisite financial aid forms, described below. We recommend that you submit the above forms promptly after admission and before March 1. If admitted after March 1, please submit these forms as soon as possible after admission.

Need-Based Aid

To be considered for need-based financial assistance (grants) at Penn Carey Law, we use the financial information that you provide for yourself, your parent(s), and if applicable, your spouse. Applicants for need-based financial aid are required to submit two applications:

the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) which is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov/ . Penn Carey Law’s FAFSA school code is 003378.

the CSS Profile Application at http://student.collegeboard.org/profile . There is a $24 fee. Need-eligible students who enroll at Penn Carey Law will receive a $24 tuition reimbursement for this fee at the time of matriculation. Note: We strongly encourage you to provide your social security number (SSN) on the CSS Profile Application and the application for admission form. Applications submitted without the SSN can experience significant processing delays. Penn Carey Law’s CSS Profile school code is 2495.

These forms must be received by March 1, if admitted before that date. Due to limited University resources, we must consider each admitted student's entire financial situation. Accordingly, Penn Carey Law requires applicants applying for need-based grants and their families (except those students age 30 and over by December 31 of the year of enrollment) to complete the parental, student, and spousal (if applicable) sections of the CSS Profile application. FAFSA applicants applying to graduate school are considered independent under federal guidelines and are only required to complete the student sections of the FAFSA application.

If you have any questions regarding the financial aid applications or evaluation process, please contact the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid at 215.898.7743 or send an email to [email protected] . Additional information about our need-based grant program can be found on our website at https://www.law.upenn.edu/admissions/financing/.

Merit Scholarship Programs

Penn Carey Law awards merit scholarships to a select number of admitted students based primarily on their academic achievements and intellectual ambition, but also based on nonacademic factors such as leadership, service, and professional or life experiences as reported in their admissions application. Most scholarships do not require a separate application, though if nominated, admitted students may be asked to interview and/or submit additional essays. Scholarship nominees and recipients are notified on a rolling basis between January and late April.

Admitted students interested in the Toll Public Interest Scholarship are required to submit a separate application. Notice of this separate application will be emailed to admitted students throughout the spring.

Penn Carey Law offers a wide range of merit scholarship opportunities that provide generous funding and unique program benefits. You can read more about all of our scholarship programs on our website at https://www.law.upenn.edu/admissions/financing/.

Students must remain in good academic standing and be enrolled as a full-time student to retain their Law School scholarship. Good academic standing requirements can be found at https://www.law.upenn.edu/students/policies/satisfactory-academic-progress.php.

Toll Loan Repayment Assistance Program (TolLRAP)

Penn Carey Law is committed to promoting the pursuit of public interest careers, and TolLRAP offers generous repayment assistance, on an annual basis, to Penn Carey Law graduates working in public sector careers. A full description of TolLRAP can be found on our website at https://www.law.upenn.edu/admissions/financing/applicants/pi-toll-loan-repayment.php.

Various federal and private loans are available to help students fund their education at Penn (repayment terms and interest vary). Students can borrow through the Federal Direct, Federal Direct Graduate PLUS, and other student loan programs. Application and program details can be found at http://www.sfs.upenn.edu/loans/index.htm.

Please note, if you are applying for loans only, you need only submit the FAFSA . The CSS Profile application is only required for students who are applying for need-based grants.

International Students

International students may apply for need-based aid (grants) and loans from private student loan lenders. Please note that student loans for international students require a U.S. cosigner. U.S. federal student loans are not available** to international students. More information on private student loans can be found on Penn’s website at http://www.sfs.upenn.edu/loans/index.htm.

8 University of Virginia Instructions

JD PROGRAM (First-Year Entry) Application Instructions

We begin accepting applications for the JD program on Tuesday, September 1, 2020. Applying on or before our March 3, 2021 priority deadline guarantees that we will issue an admissions decision no later than April 15, 2021. If you wish to apply under our Binding Expedited Decision option, we must receive all components of your application by 5:00 pm ET on March 3, 2021. Any Binding Expedited Decision applications completed after 5:00 pm ET on March 3 will be treated as Regular Decision applications. You may submit a Regular Decision application after the March 3 priority deadline. We will review all applications received after March 3, but we do not guarantee an admissions decision by April 15 .

How Applications Are Reviewed

Each year, many highly qualified college graduates apply for the necessarily limited number of places in the first-year class. Our admissions process aims to select from the applicant pool an entering class of students who will contribute to this academic community during their three years of residency and, ultimately, to society and the legal profession. To that end, we consider many factors. These include not only intellectual aptitude and academic achievement, but also individual accomplishments and experiences — such as dedication or a constructive response to adversity — that predict success, as well as geographic, racial, ethnic, economic and ideological diversity.

Rigid standards based simply on a combination of a standardized test score and cumulative undergraduate grade-point average cannot be the only criteria for selecting an entering class. We assess each applicant as an individual. This assessment takes into account not only standardized test scores and undergraduate grades, but also the strength of an applicant's undergraduate or graduate curriculum, trends in grades, the maturing effect of experiences since college, the nature and quality of any work experience, significant achievement in extracurricular activities in college, service in the military, contributions to campus or community through service and leadership, and personal qualities displayed. An applicant's experiences surmounting economic, social or educational difficulties with grace and courage, demonstrating the capacity to grow in response to challenge and showing compassion for the welfare of others can play a role in the admissions decision.

Financial need is not a factor in the admissions decision. If you will be applying for any form of need-based scholarship or loan assistance, including Direct Unsubsidized student loans, you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), designating the University of Virginia as a recipient of your needs analysis report. See www.law.virginia.edu/financialaid for more information.

BINDING EXPEDITED DECISION OPTION

If you wish to apply under the Binding Expedited Decision option, you must follow the requirements of the Regular Decision option (below) AND go to the "Binding Decision Option" tab in the e-application and click the box acknowledging agreement with the terms of the Binding Expedited Decision option. Binding Expedited Decision applicants will be notified of their decision within 21 business days of the date we receive all necessary components of the application (including the residency determination for those applicants claiming in-state educational privileges). Applicants admitted through the Binding Expedited Decision option are eligible for financial aid (both merit- and need-based) just like applicants admitted through the Regular Decision option. However, most applicants admitted to UVA Law will receive their admissions decision well before they receive any financial aid information. As a result, the Binding Expedited Decision option is best suited only to individuals who are sure that UVA Law is their top choice and who also are sure that they are prepared to begin law school at UVA in August 2021 , regardless of what their financial aid package may be.

If you wish to apply under the Binding Expedited Decision option, we must receive all components of your application by 5:00 pm ET on March 3, 2021. All applications completed after the March 3 priority deadline will be reviewed as Regular Decision applications.

REGULAR DECISION OPTION

Applicants should ensure that we have received a completed application by March 3, 2021. In addition to the completed, signed application form, you must submit the following items before your application will be deemed complete and forwarded to the Admissions Committee for review:

  • ​ Transcript of prior academic record, submitted through the Credential Assembly Service (CAS);
  • ​ A valid Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or GRE General Test score;
  • ​ At least two, but no more than four, letters of recommendation;
  • ​ At least one personal statement and résumé. Additional personal statements or any other addenda may be submitted;
  • ​ $85 application fee; and
  • ​ Application for Virginia In-State Educational Privileges, if seeking classification as a resident student.

Please note that it can take several days for an application submitted through the LSAC electronic application service to reach us. If you are applying as an in-state candidate, you also must submit the Application for Virginia In-State Educational Privileges. This form is not transmitted electronically and must be sent directly to the Office of Virginia Status. The Virginia Status Office may be reached at (434) 982-3391, by fax at (434) 982-2663, or via email at [email protected] .

Transcript of Prior Academic Record

You must register with LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service (CAS). LSAC will receive your undergraduate and any graduate transcripts, copy them, and forward the transcripts to the law schools to which you apply. Do not send your academic transcripts directly to the UVA Law Admissions Office. For more information about the CAS, go to the LSAC website at www.LSAC.org .

Standardized Test Scores

You must submit a score from one of the following approved standardized tests:

  • ​ The LSAT;
  • ​ The GMAT; or
  • ​ The GRE General Test.

The standardized test score or scores that you submit must have been earned on or after June 1, 2015 and must meet any other validity or timing requirements set out by the organization that administers that particular test. See www.lsac.org , www.mba.com , and/or www.ets.org/gre for more information about the three accepted standardized tests and the organizations’ score reporting policies.

Because LSAC provides the Credential Assembly Service, any and all LSAT scores you may have earned within the past five years will be reported on the CAS report. If you choose to submit GRE General Test and/or GMAT scores in lieu of or in addition to an LSAT score, we require you to submit all scores that you have earned on that test within the past five years. As an example, Applicant A has taken the LSAT once and the GMAT twice within the past five years. Applicant A’s LSAT score will automatically appear on her CAS report; if she chooses to report her GMAT scores as well, Applicant A must direct both GMAT scores to UVA Law. As another example, Applicant B has taken the GRE General Test three times in the past five years but has not taken the LSAT. Applicant B must direct all three GRE scores to UVA Law.

Applicants who submit GRE or GMAT scores must: (1) request that all scores be sent directly to UVA Law; and (2) attach copies of all score reports to their applications. The attached score reports should show both scores attained and percentile rank of those scores. While the GRE and/or GMAT score reports you attach to your application are a helpful aid to our Admissions Committee members, they are not a substitute for the official score reports sent directly to UVA Law by ETS and/or GMAC. If you are applying with only GRE and/or GMAT scores, we will not consider your application to be complete until we receive your official score reports from ETS and/or GMAC.

UVA Law’s school code for GRE score reports is 4266 . Please note that this code differs from ETS’s code for the University of Virginia. Be sure to use UVA Law’s school code – 4266 – when sending your GRE score to UVA Law. Applicants who wish to direct GMAT scores to the law school can search for UVA Law by name.

You should arrange to take an approved standardized test early, preferably by the autumn of the year you intend to apply to UVA Law, although later scores will be accepted. Applicants who submit standardized test scores earned in January, February, or March of the year they apply to law school may be at a disadvantage since many places in the class will have been filled by the time those test scores are received.

You must provide at least two letters of recommendation. We accept no more than four recommendation letters. Recommenders should evaluate your potential as a law student, so letters from members of your college or graduate school faculty who can discuss your academic performance are particularly helpful. If you have been out of school for several years and have difficulty securing an academic reference, you may substitute letters from employers or others who have worked closely with you. In any event, letters should address the skills necessary for rigorous, advanced academic work: the ability to read complex textual material closely, to analyze it carefully, and to present reasoned conclusions in writing and orally; maturity; self-discipline; commitment; and professionalism.

UVA Law requires applicants to submit letters through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation service. This service is included with your CAS registration. Letters submitted through the LSAC service are copied and sent to us along with your CAS Law School Report and can be read online immediately. Updated reports are sent immediately if letters are received after your initial CAS Law School Report has been sent. To use this service, follow the instructions on the LSAC website.

Your personal statement should provide information, in your own words, you believe relevant to the admissions decision not elicited elsewhere in the application. The statement is your opportunity to tell us about yourself; it may address your intellectual interests, significant accomplishments or obstacles overcome, personal or professional goals, educational achievements, or any way in which your perspective or experiences will add to the richness of the educational environment at UVA Law. Please upload your personal statement to your e-application via LSAC.

Optional Addenda

Should you wish to address other topics (or other aspects of yourself or your application), the "Optional Addenda" section can be used to address as many topics as you wish. If multiple topics will be addressed, we prefer that you separate topics and upload each as separately (and descriptively) labeled.

Unless the application fee has been waived, all applicants are required to pay the $85 application fee using a credit card through the LSAC secure server. Follow the instructions on the LSAC website. If you received a waiver for the LSAT or LSDAS fees from the Law School Admission Council, you automatically qualify for an application fee waiver from UVA Law. When you apply electronically through LSAC, the waiver will apply automatically.

Applicants serving in an established public service commitment such as Teach for America, the Peace Corps, Americorps/VISTA, CityYear, or in a Truman Public Service Fellowship, will have the application fee waived. E-mail us at [email protected] for a fee waiver.

We are happy to waive the application fee for any applicant for whom payment of the fee will prevent them from applying or would pose a hardship. E-mail us at [email protected] for a fee waiver.

We cannot under any circumstances refund a fee already paid via LSAC.

Application for Virginia In-State Educational Privileges

If you are claiming entitlement to in-state educational privileges, you must submit the Application for Virginia In-State Educational Privileges with your application for admission. This form is not transmitted electronically. Failure to submit the application, or to supply any supplemental information that may be requested by the Virginia Status Office, may delay consideration of your application or result in your classification as a nonresident candidate.

For further information concerning Virginia residency status, see http://www.virginia.edu/provost/vastatus/.

Application Information for International or Foreign-Educated Students

Transcripts of postsecondary work completed at a college or university outside the United States or Canada must be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS). The one exception to this requirement is for work completed outside the United States or Canada through a study abroad, consortium or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, where the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and incorporated into your CAS report.

We do not require TOEFL scores from JD applicants. (For information about TOEFL score requirements for LLM applicants, go to the LLM program website.) However, applicants should be aware that competency in English is critical to success in the study of law at the University of Virginia, and that demonstrated fluency in English is an important consideration in evaluating applications. Should you choose to submit a TOEFL score, you must contact the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be sent to LSAC. LSAC's TOEFL code for the CAS is 0058. Your score will be included in the International Credential Evaluation document that will be included in your CAS Law School Report.

Questions about the Credential Assembly Service can be directed to LSAC at (215) 968-1001, or [email protected] .

Importance of Full Disclosure and Continued Good Conduct

Lawyers are held to high ethical standards. Failure to disclose an act or event is often more significant, and can lead to more serious consequences, than the act or event itself. Once the application has been submitted, you have a continuing duty to maintain high standards of academic, professional, and personal conduct — in addition to a continuing duty to inform the Admissions Office of any changes to the information in the application, or of any new information without which the application as previously submitted would be inaccurate or incomplete. Your duty to inform the Admissions Office of any changes continues until the time you receive a final admissions decision and, if admitted, until the time you matriculate as a student at the University of Virginia School of Law.

False, misleading, or incomplete answers or statements made in this application, or in any materials submitted to the Admissions Office, the Financial Aid Office, or any administrative unit of the University of Virginia could constitute a basis for denial of admission, rescission of an offer of admission, or denial of admission to the practice of law. Such actions also may be reported to the Law School Admission Council for investigation of misconduct in the admissions process.

The Admissions Committee, through the Office of Admissions, reserves the right to impose any reasonable sanctions on applicants who are found to have violated continued standards of good conduct — including, but not limited to denial of admission or rescission of an offer of admission.

ABA Standard 504 Statement

Deferral and Reapplication to the Law School

Students typically are accepted for admission only for the class currently being selected, with the exception of candidates admitted to a dual-degree program who elect to begin their studies at the other graduate program. If you are admitted to the fall 2021 entering class but find that you are not able to enroll in 2021, you may request to defer your admission by making all required acceptance deposits, confirming your intention to accept your place in the class, and requesting a deferral at that time. We will ask you to reconfirm your intention to enroll during the year of planned enrollment. All deferral requests must be received by the second deposit deadline.

Students with Disabilities

Prospective students who have questions concerning accommodations for physical disabilities, learning disabilities, or other disabling conditions should contact the Office of Student Affairs at [email protected] or (434) 924-3737. Students accepted for admission are asked to contact Dean of Student Affairs Sarah Davies, regardless of whether they provided information concerning disabilities in the admissions process, regarding their conditions and any appropriate accommodations the School of Law needs to make to assure access to the school's academic programs and examinations. All information will be confidential except to the extent necessary to make accommodations.

9 Northwestern University Instructions

To be eligible for admission to the Juris Doctor program at Northwestern Law, you must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, or have completed the equivalent of six semesters and expect to graduate during the current academic year.

Typically, the Admissions Committee selects the 220 members of the first-year class from approximately 5,500 applicants. Decisions are based on a number of factors, including academic records, personal essays, recommendation letters, standardized test results, interviews, work experience, extracurricular activities, leadership, and personal circumstances.

A completed application to Northwestern Law consists of:

  • The following Application for Admission form
  • A personal statement (electronically attached to your Application for Admission)
  • One letter of recommendation
  • LSAT and/or GRE results
  • The Credential Assembly Service Law School Report, which includes your LSAT results and previous transcripts (sent to us electronically, if you have registered with LSAC)
  • A current résumé (electronically attached to your Application for Admission)
  • A nonrefundable $75 application fee (payable by credit card electronically, or by check or money order payable to Northwestern University)

Additionally, the following items are optional:

  • An evaluative interview . Please note that the Admissions Committee occasionally invites candidates to interview who previously had not requested one in order to obtain additional information prior to rendering a decision.
  • Optional essay (electronically attached to your Application for Admission)

The various parts of the completed application may be sent to the Law School before the Application for Admission itself. Any supplementary materials submitted with the Application for Admission must clearly list your name on each page. Although your Social Security number is requested to assist in the accurate assembly of your file, you are not required to supply that number.

Application Updates

Although the Office of Admissions seeks to keep you informed of the status of your application, it is your responsibility to ensure that all parts of your application are received before the deadline. You can check the status of your application via a website that will be emailed to you after receipt of your application. To receive this email, you must apply with a valid email address.

Applicants will be notified of their decisions electronically. Decisions will not be sent via U.S. mail, nor will be decisions be provided over the phone.

How to Apply for Admission

We require that all applicants complete their application to Northwestern Law via the LSAC Credential Assembly Service electronic application.

If you have difficulty with the electronic application or lack access to a computer, we will email you a PDF copy of the application or fax you a paper version. Please contact the Office of Admissions at (312) 503-8465 or [email protected] .

The personal statement is your opportunity to introduce yourself to the Admissions Committee and distinguish yourself from other applicants. You may discuss, among other topics, your personal or professional goals, or personal, academic, or career history. Please do not send revisions to your personal statement after you have submitted your application.

Letter of Recommendation

One letter of recommendation is required. The letter should be completed by someone who may evaluate your professional performance (e.g., current or former supervisor, client, or co-worker) or your academic performance (e.g., college professor).

Please note that because only one recommendation is required, your file will become complete once we have received the first letter. The Office of Admissions will not hold your file for pending recommendations.

Credential Assembly Service Law School Report

The Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Law School Report contains a summary of each applicant’s academic work and LSAT results. It also includes copies of college transcripts.

You are encouraged to register for CAS in early fall. Please ask your college registrars to mail transcripts to LSAC as soon as they become available. Although LSAC attempts to inform each applicant about the receipt of transcripts, you are responsible for following up with LSAC.

If you received your undergraduate degree from an educational institution outside the United States, its territories, and Canada, you are encouraged to register with CAS and have your transcripts and any other required documentation sent to LSAC for processing. LSAC will then forward your complete CAS report to the Law School. If you choose not to use a CAS report, you must have an official copy of your transcripts, in English (or a certified translation), sent directly to the Office of Admissions.

Applicants must take either the LSAT or the GRE and submit valid test result(s) as part of their application for admission. The Law School will accept LSAT or GRE scores up to five years after the test date. If you take either test more than once, we will use your highest score(s) when evaluating your file.

LSAT test results are sent directly to the Law School from LSAC as part of your CAS report. Therefore, if you have taken the LSAT and have a valid reported score on file, it cannot be waived from your application. Applicants may register for the LSAT through the LSAC website .

Applicants applying may submit their GRE test result(s) in lieu of or in conjunction with LSAT test result(s) for the Admissions Committee to consider. If you elect to submit your GRE scores for consideration and have taken the GRE more than once in the last five years then you must submit all valid GRE test results. GRE test results are sent directly to the Law School from ETS. Northwestern Law's GRE school code is 2579.

To be sure that your application is completed on time, you should take either test no later than October 2020 f you are applying early decision or no later than January 2021 if you are applying regular decision. Although later test results are accepted, waiting for these results may delay review of your application.

Additional information can be found on our website, http://www.law.northwestern.edu/admissions/faq/faqjd.html#TEST.

Optional Essay

The optional essay is your opportunity to give the Admissions Committee additional information that you may not be able to incorporate into your personal statement. The topic for the optional essay is located in the Application for Admission.

Online Video Interviews

All applicants have the option of including an evaluative interview with their application. All interviews are conducted online. Interviews provide the Admissions Committee with additional information about your interpersonal skills, maturity, and motivation. Interviews also provide you with the opportunity to learn more about the Law School.

To request an online interview, you must first submit your application for admission and indicate your desire to complete an online interview. Within 5-7 business days of submitting your application, you will receive an acknowledgement of your interview request and a link to the online video portal where you will register and complete your online interview. Online interviews can be conducted at any time of the day and can be completed in approximately thirty minutes.

Important Interview Deadlines:

Early Decision applicants are required to submit an online video interview. It must be completed by November 16. The interview is optional for regular decision applicants. Regular decision applicants who wish to complete an interview must do so by February 28.

Should you apply after our published application deadline date of February 15th, the Admissions Committee may contact you with further questions about your application or invite you to submit an online video interview.

Application Filing Period

Applications for Admission are accepted from September 1 to February 15, and are reviewed on a rolling basis beginning in November. Applicants should complete the application process as early as possible, as an early application often yields an early decision. If your materials are received by the February 15 deadline, you will be notified of your decision by the end of May.

The Law School may exclude from consideration any application submitted after February 15 or any application that is incomplete on that date. Applications are considered only for the current year and for full-time registration. There is no evening program or mid-year entry.

Early Decision Program

Applicants who have thoroughly researched their law school options and have identified Northwestern Pritzker School of Law as their first choice law school may wish to apply through the Early Decision program. Applicants admitted through the Early Decision program receive a $40,000 annual scholarship.

Northwestern Law’s Early Decision program is binding. If admitted through the Early Decision program, you must commit to matriculating at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law and submit a nonrefundable $750 seat deposit by the date indicated in your admission letter. You must also withdraw all of your applications to other schools and refrain from initiating any new applications. You may not be an Early Decision candidate at more than one law school.

To be considered for the Early Decision program, your application must be complete by November 16, including your Credential Assembly Service Law School Report. Accordingly, it is in your best interest to submit your application by November 2 to ensure all materials are received in time and to allow time for you to complete the required online video interview. The last acceptable LSAT score is from the October 2020 LSAT administration.

ED applicants must have at least one valid LSAT or GRE test result(s).

An online video interview is required for all Early Decision candidates. Your online video interview must be completed by November 16.

Finally, you must sign and return the Early Decision Certification (Supplemental Application) directly to the Office of Admissions with your Application for Admission. Your Early Decision Certification will not be transmitted by the Credential Assembly Service.

The Early Decision deadline is November 16, 2020 for the Fall 2021 admissions cycle. Early Decision candidates will be notified of their decisions by the end of December.

Application Fees and Deposits

The Law School charges the following nonrefundable fees:

Reapplicants

Although the Office of Admissions maintains applications for two years, the Admissions Committee requires reapplicants to submit a full application, including an updated personal statement. The updated application will enable the re-applicant to adequately present information that has changed since the original application.

Foreign-Educated Applicants

A separate test of English proficiency is not required for admission into the JD program.

JD-MBA Program

The Law School and Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management offer a combined JD-MBA program. The joint program enables you to complete both degrees in three years instead of five.

All applicants must submit a single online application, which is available here . Please refer to the application for deadlines.

An evaluative interview must be arranged with a member of Kellogg’s admissions staff or a Kellogg alumni representative. The admissions officers at Kellogg and the Law School jointly evaluate all applications.

Both degrees are conferred upon completion of 16 managerial courses, including all core courses, and a minimum of 73 semester hours of Law School coursework.

JD-PhD Program

The Law School and Northwestern’s Graduate School offer a combined JD-PhD program. The JD-PhD program allows students to earn a law degree and a doctorate in approximately six years. Applicants may select a doctoral program in any discipline, provided they can incorporate their interest in legal studies with their graduate research. Furthermore, JD-PhD candidates must complete a dissertation that integrates both disciplines.

In addition to any tests required by The Graduate School, JD-PhD applicants can satisfy the Law Schools's admission test requirement by submitting either the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or both . Additional information about the JD-PhD application is available here .

The primary objective of the JD-PhD program is to produce scholars who have the skills necessary to conduct basic and applied research in legal systems. Graduates qualify for admission to the bar.

Financial Aid Checklist

To be considered for scholarships and federal and/or private educational loans, you must submit:

  • A 2020-2021 Free Application for Federal Student Aid
  • A university required application, available January 1
  • Northwestern Pritzker School of Law's own Scholarship and Grant Supplemental Application (available only to admitted students)

Northwestern offers a comprehensive financial aid program designed to enable any admitted student to attend the law school, regardless of financial need. To that end, all scholarships are awarded on a combined basis of need and merit.

Applying for financial aid is separate from the admissions process, and financial aid information has no bearing on admissions decisions.

Financial Aid for International Students

International students do not need to file a FAFSA, as they are not eligible to receive federal loans. However, they may be eligible for scholarships and private educational loans.

To be considered for scholarships, you must submit:

  • The Scholarship and Grant Supplemental Application (available only to admitted students)

To be considered for private educational loans, you must submit:

Please include the conversion rate of foreign currency into U.S. dollars. Tax returns in a foreign language must be accompanied by a certified translation.

Northwestern University Nondiscrimination Statement

Northwestern University does not discriminate or permit discrimination by any member of its community against any individual on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, parental status, marital status, age, disability, citizenship status, veteran status, genetic information, reproductive health decision making, or any other classification protected by law in matters of admissions, employment, housing, or services or in the educational programs or activities it operates. Harassment, whether verbal, physical, or visual, that is based on any of these characteristics is a form of discrimination. Further prohibited by law is discrimination against any employee and/or job applicant who chooses to inquire about, discuss, or disclose their own compensation or the compensation of another employee or applicant.

Northwestern University complies with federal and state laws that prohibit discrimination based on the protected categories listed above, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Title IX requires educational institutions, such as Northwestern, to prohibit discrimination based on sex (including sexual harassment) in the University’s educational programs and activities, including in matters of employment and admissions. In addition, Northwestern provides reasonable accommodations to qualified applicants, students, and employees with disabilities and to individuals who are pregnant.

Any alleged violations of this policy or questions with respect to nondiscrimination or reasonable accommodations should be directed to Northwestern’s Office of Equity, 1800 Sherman Avenue, Suite 4-500, Evanston, Illinois 60208, 847-467-6165, [email protected].

Information on Title IX Sexual Harassment, including information on how to file a report or complaint, how Northwestern will respond, and the complaint resolution procedures and process, can be found in the Interim Policy on Title IX Sexual Harassment. Information other forms of sexual misconduct, discrimination or harassment, including information on how to file a report or complaint, how Northwestern will respond, and the complaint resolution procedures and process, can be found in the Policy on Institutional Equity. These policies are available on the Office of Equity’s website: www.northwestern.edu/equity.

Questions specific to sex discrimination (including sexual misconduct and sexual harassment) should be directed to Northwestern’s Title IX Coordinator in the Office of Equity, 1800 Sherman Avenue, Suite 4-500, Evanston, Illinois 60208, 847-467-6165, [email protected].

9 University of California—Berkeley Instructions

First-year applicants, application.

We require that you submit your application electronically through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) website at LSAC.org . The LSAC Help Desk is available at (215) 968-1393 if you have questions. We receive completed applications electronically from LSAC usually within one hour of your submission.

Paying Your Application Fee

A $75.00 (USD) non-refundable application fee is required to process your application. The fee must be received before your application can be reviewed. You must pay by credit card or have a valid fee waiver.

Application Fee Waivers

Lsac waivers.

Waivers of the LSAT and Credential Assembly Service (CAS) fees are available on a financial need basis directly from LSAC. Information is available on the LSAC website. You should act early to obtain a waiver.

We will waive your Berkeley Law application fee automatically if you are approved for an LSAC fee waiver.

Berkeley Law Waivers

A limited number of Berkeley Law application fee waivers are available to applicants who submit our online form . Please submit the form along with proof of participation directly to the Admissions Office. Proof of participation falls into three broad categories: Honors/Research (e.g., Fulbright, Marshall, Rhodes, Truman), Public Service (e.g., Teach for America, Peace Corps, Military service), and Educational/Socioeconomic Disadvantage (e.g., CYDL participant, Gates Scholar, Pell Grant recipient). For a detailed list, please go to the online form page.

The deadline for fee waiver requests is 5:00 p.m. (PST) on January 15, 2021. Applicants who are not approved for a fee waiver or who do not meet the deadline must pay the $75 application fee. Please do not attach a fee waiver request to your online application; it will not be reviewed. You will be notified via e-mail once a decision is reached regarding your fee waiver request. If your request is approved, you will be given an application waiver code that will allow you to submit your application without having to pay the application fee. Waiver codes are non-transferable and can only be used once. A record of your code is kept both with LSAC and the Berkeley Law Admissions Office. Any misuse of the fee waiver code may result in withdrawal of your application and a referral to LSAC's Misconduct Committee.

Do not pay with a credit card prior to applying for and receiving a Berkeley Law fee waiver decision. We are not able to refund our fee once it is paid.

Registering for the LSAT/LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

The majority of our applicants must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), which is administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), and also establish an account with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service (CAS). All related information and policies are available on the LSAC website at LSAC.org .

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

The LSAT is offered eight times each year (January, February, April, June, July, September, October, and November) at examination centers throughout the world. Test scores are valid for five years. If you took the LSAT between September 2015 and January 2021, then you are not required to take it again. However, you must ensure that your CAS registration is current so that your test score(s) and transcripts are sent to us. If you register for a future test date, we will automatically hold your application for review until we receive the new score from LSAC. You may request that your application be reviewed without the updated LSAT score. If you take the LSAT more than once, we will use the highest score. Ensure that you have a valid LSAT writing sample by the application deadline of February 15. LSAC requires that you have at least one valid writing sample on file in order to issue a CAS report (including LSAT scores) to law schools. A note on the LSAT-Flex: We will accept the LSAT-Flex exam, and we will not treat it differently than an in-person administration of the exam.

When evaluating LSAT scores, the law school may consider whether similar tests that were taken in the past under-predicted your academic performance. If you received very high undergraduate grades, but you can document that you performed poorly on another standardized test (by submitting a copy of your SAT or ACT scores, for example), then this factor may be taken into account in evaluating your potential to succeed in law school.

Other Standardized Tests

For a limited group of applicants, mainly those applying for dual degrees, we may accept GRE or GMAT scores. Please review our admissions website for eligibility criteria. If you have taken or plan to take the LSAT, you must also submit those scores to us in a CAS report from LSAC.

You must register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS), a service of LSAC that collects and analyzes academic data and transcripts. Your CAS registration authorizes LSAC to compile your application documents and send CAS reports to the law schools where you apply.

Using directions provided by Berkeley Law, CAS will combine your LSAT score and undergraduate grade point average (GPA) into a single value, called the index number, and will print the index number on your CAS report. This report, which contains your undergraduate academic summary, LSAT score(s), copies of transcripts, writing sample(s), and letters of recommendation, is sent to us electronically.

Graduate school grades are not calculated into the index number. However, they are considered a "plus" factor during the review process and are therefore required in your CAS transcript information.

You will be able to monitor your CAS status through the LSAC website ( LSAC.org ).

Transcripts

You must arrange to have a transcript submitted to LSAC from every undergraduate and graduate college or university you have attended. If you are currently completing undergraduate work, do not wait for fall or winter grades to be posted on the transcript that you send to LSAC. If you wish, you may submit these grades to LSAC later and an updated report will be sent to us. Please note, however, that decisions on many applications may already have been made before we receive these grades.

Grade Point Average

In evaluating your undergraduate GPA, the following factors will be considered: The age of the grades, exceptionally high grades, difficulty of coursework, time commitments while attending college, dependent care during school, grading patterns at the school attended, and grade trends or discrepancies among your grades.

You are required to submit a personal statement as part of your application. It should be limited to four double-spaced pages. The thoughts and words contained therein must be your own and no one else should assist in its creation beyond basic proofreading or critiquing. The subject matter of the statement is up to you, but keep in mind that the reviewer will be focused on determining your potential to be a successful law student and graduate of Berkeley Law. We seek to enroll a class with varied backgrounds and interests.

If applicable, you may describe any disadvantages that may have adversely affected your past performance and which you successfully have overcome. These may include linguistic barriers or a personal or family history of cultural, educational, or socioeconomic disadvantage. If you wish, you may discuss how your interests, background, life experiences, and perspectives might contribute to the diversity of our student body. This discussion may either be incorporated into your personal statement or provided in a short appended statement. We ask that you also include a résumé of your past and current employment history, extracurricular activities, interests, and honors.

Letters of recommendation are not required to complete your application. If you submit letters, we recommend that you provide two letters from recommenders who are familiar with your past academic performance and who are able to assess your potential for law study. Typically, these would be professors or teaching assistants. If you have been away from academia for some time, letters from work colleagues are useful. We accept up to four letters of recommendation. A dean's certification letter is not required.

We will not hold your application for review pending receipt of your recommendations. If you want all of your letters to be considered in the review process, be sure that they are available with your Credential Assembly Service (CAS) report when you submit your application.

You are required to use the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service if you submit letters. This service is included in your CAS registration. Letters are sent to us with your CAS report, and there is a maximum of four letters allowed.

Application Deadline

All application materials must be submitted electronically before 11:59 PM (PST) on February 15. Your application should be submitted as early as possible to receive optimal consideration. We begin to review applications in early October. Applications submitted or postmarked after the deadline are not accepted.

Residency and Citizenship

The information requested on the application form regarding residency and citizenship is used for demographic reference. If you are admitted, residency determinations for tuition purposes are made at the time of registration.

Applicants with Disabilities

Berkeley Law does not discriminate against students with disabilities and is committed to admitting people from all segments of society. It is our desire to ensure that each application is reviewed appropriately. Applicants may share information about disabilities in the written parts of the application (personal statement, diversity statement, etc.), or may write a separate addendum. This information will be used solely in connection with the school's voluntary efforts to address any conditions that may result in limited participation by persons with disabilities. Thus, a disability may be considered as one factor in the evaluation of an application. Disability-related information disclosed voluntarily by an applicant will in no way adversely affect an applicant's candidacy.

Accommodations provided by the law school for students with disabilities are designed and implemented in consultation with U.C. Berkeley's Disabled Students Program (DSP). For more information, call DSP at (510) 642-0518 or (510) 642-6376 (TTY/TDD), or visit http://dsp.berkeley.edu/. When students with disabilities enroll, they may be assessed by DSP professionals, who can recommend specific accommodations to the Director of Student Services at Berkeley Law.

International Applicants

The financial resources required for international students to attend Berkeley Law are substantial. International applicants should evaluate their ability to meet the total education costs and to obtain a visa. International applicants must be prepared to fund all of their educational and living expenses. Even students who receive some fellowship assistance must be prepared to provide approximately $93,000 (USD) per academic year required for educational and living expenses at Berkeley. If the student is married and/or has children, an additional $7,650 is recommended for the spouse, and an additional $6,750 is recommended for each child. These funds must be provided by either the applicant or the applicant's sponsor.

We require that foreign transcripts be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS). An evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) and will be incorporated into your CAS report. More time is usually required to receive foreign transcripts.

Character and Fitness

If you answer "Yes" to any of the character and fitness questions, we require that you attach an addendum explaining the circumstances. Note that an affirmative answer to any of these questions does not necessarily preclude or even prejudice admission to Berkeley Law. Your answer will be reviewed on an individual basis in relation to all aspects of your experience, academic achievement, and potential.

If your answer to any of the character and fitness questions contained in this application becomes affirmative after you submit your application, you are required to notify the Admissions Office in writing. Failure to disclose and/or notify us will result in the revocation of your offer of admission.

Non-Discrimination Statement

Berkeley Law, in accordance with applicable federal and state law and the University's non-discrimination policies, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy/childbirth and medical conditions related thereto, disability, age, medical condition, ancestry, marital status, citizenship, or status as a Vietnam-era veteran or special disabled veteran. This non-discrimination policy covers student admission, access and treatment in university programs and activities.

The Application Process

The review process begins in October. You are encouraged to have your application complete and submitted as early as possible.

You are responsible for ensuring that we receive your application by the deadline. Within a day of submitting your application, you will be able to access your Berkeley Law Status Checker, which will allow you to monitor the status of your application. You also will be able to track your Credential Assembly Service activity through your LSAC account.

Your application cannot be reviewed until we receive your application form and fee, a complete CAS report (including all valid test scores), and your personal statement. Our review will not be deferred pending receipt of recommendations.

Contacting Applicants

Decision letters and other correspondence will be sent to the email address you provide on your application. Be sure that your email address is current at all times and add "[email protected]" to prevent our email from landing in your spam folder.

Our concern for confidentiality precludes discussion of individual files with anyone other than the applicant unless authorized by the applicant. If you expect to be unavailable at any point during the application process, you should appoint someone to act on your behalf and inform the Admissions Office in writing of the appointee's name, e-mail address, and phone number.

Once a file is complete, it is evaluated by the Dean of Admissions or by another professional Admissions Office staff member. The Admissions Office, guided by faculty policy, admits a certain number of applicants who, under the governing criteria and on the basis of the Dean's experience, would have a high likelihood of admission if referred to the Admissions Committee. Similarly, applicants who would have a high likelihood of being denied if referred to the Committee are administratively denied. The remaining applicants are reviewed and considered by the Admissions Committee, which is composed of faculty, senior professional staff, and students.

Only students who are members of the Admissions Committee are permitted to read files. Applicants may indicate on the application form whether or not they consent to have their file read by a student member of the Admissions Committee. Students selected for participation on with Admission Committee are typically third year law students who will graduate before admitted students matriculate. In the evaluation of each file, no weight is given to whether or not the applicant has consented to student review. In every case, complete confidentiality of all materials is maintained.

As a result of the Dean of Admissions and/or Committee's consideration, some applicants are admitted, some are placed on a waiting list, and the remaining applicants are denied. A small number of applicants may be placed on administrative hold if either the Dean of Admissions or Admissions Committee feels that they are not prepared to make a final determination at the time of their initial review. Applicants placed on administrative hold usually receive a decision between April 15 to June 1. If the number of admitted students who accept an offer of admission falls below the number necessary to fill the class, then the waiting list is used to fill the remaining places.

Scholarship Application (optional)

The Scholarship application is an optional section intended to invite applicants to self-identify as possible candidates for certain, very specific awards, and to allow them to provide additional information in support of their candidacy. This application is not a complete list of scholarships available at Berkeley Law. Additional information about scholarships can be found on the Scholarships page of our website.

With the exception of the Berkeley Law Opportunity Scholarship (BLOS), completed applications must be received by February 15. Applicants to BLOS must submit a complete application no later than December 15. If all application materials are received by December 15, with the exception of November LSAT test score, your application still will be considered for a BLOS.

The BLOS and Graduate Diversity Program (GDP) scholarship both require submission of additional essays, which can either be uploaded in the attachments section of online application, or emailed to [email protected] . The essay prompt for each award is listed in the scholarship section of the application.

Please review the Scholarship information carefully for additional information and requirements that pertain to each award. All admitted students will be considered for scholarships in general.

Other Financial Aid

The scholarship application is not inclusive of all scholarships available at Berkeley Law. Additional information about scholarships can be found on the Scholarships page our website. If you receive an admissions offer, we will provide instructions on applying for other gift aid (fellowships, grants, scholarships, etc.) at that time.

Socioeconomic Questionnaire (optional)

We seek to identify students whose ability to overcome disadvantages or obstacles promises success in law school and in the profession. To this end, applicants are invited to complete the socioeconomic questionnaire included with the application. Completion of the questionnaire is optional and will not adversely affect an applicant's candidacy. If a questionnaire is submitted, it will be used to augment the other factors considered during the evaluation process.

You may choose to attach a response to one or more of the following questions in addition to the required Personal Statement if you feel the information would be helpful to us when considering your application.

Tell us more about your interest in Berkeley Law. What makes our school a good fit for you in terms of academic interests, programmatic offerings, and learning environment? (350 word maximum)

If you do not believe that your standardized test score(s) or academic record accurately reflect your ability to succeed in law school, then you may tell us why and share what you believe indicates your potential. (250 word maximum). Y ou may attach a copy of your SAT or ACT score report(s) to this essay, and we reserve the right to request score reports to verify statements made in this optional essay.

How will you (your perspective, experience, Voice) contribute diversity in our classrooms and community? Feel free to address any factors or attributes you consider important and relevant. In the past, applicants have included information about characteristics such as: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, socio-economic background, first generation college or professional school student, student parent, re-entry student, geographic diversity, ideological diversity, and others. (350 word maximum)

Other Factors

In making admission decisions, substantial weight is given to the undergraduate GPA and LSAT score. However, other factors are also considered and quantitative factors alone are not dispositive. If it appears that an applicant has experienced disadvantages that have adversely affected the applicant's past performance, and that the applicant has successfully overcome such disadvantages, this information will be considered when assessing the applicant's potential to be distinguished in the study and practice of law and to contribute to the educational process and the legal profession.

Race, religion, sex, color, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and national origin are not used as criteria for admission. No weight is given to the political or ideological views of the applicant, how an applicant intends to use his or her legal education, nor to an applicant's need for financial aid or employment during law school.

Concurrent Degree Programs

If you are applying to a concurrent degree program (CDP) with another department at U.C. Berkeley, please be aware that application deadlines, decision notifications, financial aid requirements and processing timelines, and commitment deadlines vary from program to program. It's possible that you will be required to make a commitment to another degree program before you have learned of your decision from Berkeley Law (or vice versa).

To address a part of this issue, we offer expedited review (ER) of applications to U.C. Berkeley CDPs in some cases. In order for CDP applicants to be eligible for ER, you must submit a complete application to Berkeley Law on or before December 1st of the current application year. The last LSAT administration that would make you eligible for ER is the November test, including a Writing Sample completed before December 1. (A Writing Sample must be on file to allow us to receive your CAS report). Note: ER only applies to the admission review process, not to financial aid review.

Notification of Decision

Once you submit your application, you may assume that it is being processed in a timely manner. You will receive an email informing you when your application is being reviewed. Decision notifications are also sent out via email. In previous years, most applicants were notified of their admissions decision by mid-March. Admitted applicants usually have several weeks in which to respond to an admission offer. In no case will an applicant be required to respond before April 1.

Because we process large numbers of applications each year, we ask that you do not telephone unless it is urgent. You may email questions to [email protected] .

Acceptance Deposit

Berkeley Law does not require an acceptance deposit. Instead the school relies on the integrity of those admitted to provide candid responses about accepting the offer of admission.

Reconsideration

Once an applicant has been denied admission, the file is not reconsidered during that admission cycle. Files are carefully reviewed on a comparative basis. Reconsideration after the conclusion of the process might create an unfair situation more favorable to the individual applicant, since reconsideration would lack the perspective provided by comparison with other files.

Exceptions are made only in unusual cases in which an error, for which the applicant was not responsible and which the applicant promptly brought to the law school's attention, may have affected the decision.

Deferment of Admission

Applicants are encouraged to apply in the year in which they wish to enroll. However, deferment requests may be granted at the discretion of the Dean of Admissions. Examples of reasons a deferment might be granted include: Admission to a concurrent degree program, a serious family illness, award of a fellowship, or another extraordinary opportunity.

Applicants Who Wish To Reapply

Applicants who wish to reapply are required to comply with all of the regular application instructions. Applicants who took the LSAT prior to September 2015 must take the test again and re-register with the CAS.

Contact the Berkeley Law Admissions Office

E-mail: [email protected] Phone: (510) 642-2274 Fax: (510) 643-6222 Mail: 225 Law Building Berkeley, CA 94720-7200 Web: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/

FIRST YEAR APPLICANT CHECKLIST

The application filing period begins September 1, 2020. Applications must be submitted no later than 11:59 PM (PST) February 15, 2021. Submit application through LSAC's website. Late applications are not accepted.

  • Law School Admission Test (LSAT) with writing sample taken between September 2015 and January 2021 (unless you qualify to submit GRE/GMAT scores)
  • Submit transcripts and recommendations to the Credential Assembly Service (CAS)
  • Enclose the Personal Statement, resume, and optional addenda
  • Submit the $75.00 application fee
  • Application Fee Waiver Requests: January 15
  • J.D. Program Application: February 15

9 University of Michigan Instructions

Instructions: the university of michigan law school, application process.

We will accept applications for the 2021–2022 academic year between August 1, 2020, and February 28, 2021. Filing of the application form alone is sufficient to meet the regular-decision deadline of February 28. (Please see below for a discussion of our binding Early Decision option, for which the application deadline is November 15.) However, because we use a rolling admissions process (that is, we review applications in the order in which they are completed), applicants are encouraged to submit Michigan’s application form and all supporting documentation as early as possible in the admissions season. Applicants who submit supporting materials after the February 28 deadline may be at a disadvantage.

All applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service and register for and take the LSAT (discussed below). An applicant’s file is considered complete when the application for admission, the $75 application fee, one letter of recommendation, a résumé, the personal statement, and an LSAC Law School Report, including an LSAT writing sample, have been received by the Admissions Office. Once an application is complete, it will be submitted for review.

Members of the Law School’s admissions staff are happy to meet with applicants, alone or in small groups, to answer general questions about the Law School and the application process, although we do not perform evaluative interviews. The Admissions Office offers student-led tours when classes are in session and maintains a list of classes that visitors are welcome to attend. Applicants who plan to visit Ann Arbor are encouraged to contact the Admissions Office (call 734.764.0537, or email [email protected], or register online at our website) for appointments.

For more information and FAQ about the application process, please refer to our website . We encourage you to keep track of your application via our online status checker .

LSAT/CAS REGISTRATION

Law School applicants must register for and take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), and register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). The University of Michigan Law School requires the LSAT from all applicants, except for thos already enrolled in a graduate program in another school or department at the University; for those applicants, we will accept your GRE, GMAT, or MCAT score in lieu of an LSAT score.

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

During the 2020-21 testing year, the LSAT is scheduled to be offered eight times. We recommend that applicants take the test by January of the calendar year in which admission is sought. For example, applicants to Michigan’s entering class of 2021 are best-served by taking the LSAT no later than January 2021. Applicants who submit scores from February 2021 or later may hinder their chances of admission because their applications will not be completed until late in our cycle. During the 2020–2021 admissions season, applicants must submit a score from the June 2015 test or later.

Beginning with the July 2019 administration, LSAT takers will be able to complete LSAT Writing, a proctored, on-demand writing exam, at a time and place of their choosing, after the completion of the rest of the LSAT exam. Applicants who already have a writing sample on file from a previous exam are not required to submit additional samples, although they may do so if they wish. We will consider your application complete once we have one LSAT writing sample.

Registration with Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

CAS registration directs LSAC to compile a number of LSAC Law School Reports to be sent, upon request, to the law schools to which you apply. Law School Reports include an undergraduate academic summary, all LSAT scores and writing samples, and copies of all transcripts submitted to CAS. Applicants who are reapplying to the University of Michigan Law School must register with CAS even if they do not intend to retake the LSAT.

Applicants must submit transcripts to CAS from every undergraduate college or university they have attended. These transcripts must be requested by the applicant and sent directly from all US and Canadian undergraduate institutions to LSAC, Box 2000-M, 662 Penn Street, Newtown, PA 18940-0993. CAS will summarize the transcripts and send a summary report, as well as copies of all transcripts, to each law school to which application is made. For international undergraduate work, transcripts from international institutions should be mailed to LSAC, Box 8502, 662 Penn Street, Newtown, PA 18940- 8502. A Foreign Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), and will be incorporated into your Law School Report. Please be aware that there can be significant delays in processing international transcript requests.

If you completed international work through a study abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, and the credits for that work are clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript, you do not need to provide copies of the international transcript.

Applicants who have undertaken graduate work must provide official graduate school transcripts. These transcripts must also be sent directly from the graduate institution to CAS.

Applicants use the LSAC FlexApp to apply, but we offer a couple of resources on our website that may be useful for completing it.

First, despite our efforts to be as transparent as possible, we think it’s inevitable that our questions on the FlexApp will raise questions for the applicants—so we provide an annotated version, with all the tips and tricks we can think of. This version is available in the forms section of the LSAC application, as well as at our website .

Second, after you submit the LSAC FlexApp, we download all that information into a completely different (more aesthetically pleasing and paper-saving) format, and use that for our review. We invite you to take a peek at the reader’s-eye view of our application PDF; it’s available in the forms section, and at our website .

Finally, please note : While providing your Social Security number on the application form is entirely optional, you must provide it to us in order to be processed for federal financial aid, including loans. Therefore, if you do not wish to include the number on your admissions application but do intend to submit the FAFSA, please contact our Financial Aid Office ( 734.764.5289 to discuss.

APPLICATION FEE

In general, all applications for admission must be accompanied by a $75 application fee or a waiver. Applications may be paid for with a credit card via LSAC. Checks or money orders drawn on a U.S. bank should be made payable to the University of Michigan; we cannot accept cash.

We are pleased, however, to offer several types of application fee waivers. First, we give application fee waivers through LSAC's Candidate Referral Service. These fee waivers are granted to highly qualified applicants who have regisered for CRS, and will appear automatically in the application checkout on LSAC. (We also send letters and emails to recipients to make them aware they've been selected.)

We also waive the application fees of candidates who meet any of the bulleted criteria listed below:

  • U.S. military members and veterans
  • Corps members and alumni of both City Year, AmeriCorps, and Teach for America
  • Applicants who demonstrate financial need (including any candidates who receive an LSAC Fee Waiver)

If you meet any of the criteria listed above, please visit this page to verify your status and request a fee waiver.

Although Michigan requires only one letter of recommendation, applicants are encouraged to submit three. Typically, the most helpful recommendations are from undergraduate or graduate faculty, but letters from employers, particularly for candidates with significant work experience, can provide extremely informative input as well. Recommendations from coaches, volunteer supervisors, or others who know you well and have had the opportunity to review your abilities and contributions may also be worthwhile additions. Personal recommendations, from family friends or others, are generally not helpful.

Letters of recommendation are most helpful when they discuss the extent and nature of the recommender’s acquaintance with the applicant and comment candidly on as many of the following subjects as possible: the applicant’s intellectual and scholarship abilities, capacity for original thought, ability to analyze and critically assess information, quality of oral and written expression, growth potential, achievements, and personality, including interactions with peers and with the recommender.

Letters of recommendation may be sent to us in any one of three ways: Letters may be sent directly by the recommender; they may be sent by a college career or placement office; or they may be sent by the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. Each letter of recommendation must be accompanied by a signed declaration of the applicant’s intent regarding access to the letter. While no special form is required generally, letters sent through LSAC should be accompanied by the LSAC form.

PERSONAL STATEMENT, OPTIONAL ESSAYS, AND ADDENDA

The University of Michigan Law School has long understood that enrolling students with a broad range of perspectives and experiences generates a vibrant culture of comprehensive debate and discussion. Essay submissions are an extremely helpful tool for evaluating potential contributions to our community. To that end, we require a personal statement, and also invite applicants to submit one or two supplemental essays from among the eight topics described in the application. For a fuller discussion of the form and content of essay submissions, please see the Attachments section under "Supplemental Essays."

If there is any information in your application you wish to clarify—for example, your undergraduate record or gaps in employment—you may submit that information in the Attachments section under "Addendum." You may submit as many addenda as you need.

EARLY DECISION OPTION

We offer a binding Early Decision program for applicants who have considered and investigated their law school options carefully and are confident that the University of Michigan Law School is their clear first choice. In return for the Law School's commitment to give an Early Decision applicant a decision by a particular date, applicants must restrict their law school choices and commit, at the time of application, to attend Michigan Law School if admitted. Applicants to our Early Decision program may apply to other law schools, but may not apply to any other binding early decision programs. If admitted under the Early Decision program, applicants must withdraw any existing applications to other law schools (regardless of the status of those applications), as well as not initiate any new applications. While Early Decision candidates are evaluated for admission according to the same selection criteria that apply to all candidates, their clear enthusiasm for Michigan Law School as their first choice will be taken into account as a positive factor in our evaluation.

Early Decision programs are not for everyone. Students admitted under these programs restrict their law school choice in return for the certainty of learning an admission decision earlier than is typical. While Early Decision applicants are eligible for merit- and need-based financial grants on the same terms as every other admitted student, students for whom financial aid considerations are paramount are not well-suited for this program: Financial aid decisions are not made until later in the season, and those admitted under Early Decision will not have an opportunity to compare awards from other schools. Likewise, students who have not had an opportunity to research law schools thoroughly prior to applying may end up being dissatisfied at having restricted their choices.

Early Decision applications must be submitted by November 15. Early Decision applicants must take the LSAT no later than the October administration, and must register with LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service no later than October 10. All application components must be received by the Admissions Office by the deadline, with the exception that the LSAC Report and LSAT score may not be available until later if applicants sat for the October LSAT administration. Early Decision applications that are incomplete by the deadline will be automatically considered as part of the regular admissions process, and applicants will be so informed. Early Decision applicants must indicate on the application form that they are applying for the binding program by checking the Early Decision box, as well as by signing the Early Decision certification.

Applicants admitted via Early Decision will be required to submit a $600 deposit by January 15.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY

The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, disability, religion, height, weight, or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the Senior Director for Institutional Equity, and Title IX/Section 504/ADA Coordinator, Office for Institutional Equity, 2072 Administrative Services Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1432, 734-763-0235, TTY 734-647-1388, [email protected] . For other University of Michigan information call 734-764-1817.

CONTACT THE ADMISSIONS OFFICE

12 duke university instructions, 2021 first-year jd application.

The following instructions are for first-year JD applicants for the 2021 entering class. The first-year JD application may also be used to apply for dual degree programs. Do not use this application to apply as a transfer or visitor student.

Application Checklist

Please review the checklist items. You will be notified by email once your application has been received. The email will include instructions on how to monitor your file status online. Applications that are missing required material will be reviewed later in the cycle and final decisions will be rendered based on the information that exists in the file at that time.

  • JD application - submit electronically through LSAC
  • $80 non-refundable application processing fee - submit electronically with the application
  • Résumé - use attachment to submit electronically with the application
  • Personal statement - use attachment to submit electronically with the application
  • Optional essays - use attachments to submit electronically with the application
  • Two recommendation letters - submit through LSAC to be included in the CAS Report
  • Academic Transcripts - submit through LSAC to be included in the CAS report
  • LSAC CAS Report
  • LSAT/LSAT-Flex with writing sample or GRE
  • Letter from previous law school - if applicable
  • InitialView interview or TOEFL - international applicants only, if applicable

GENERAL INFORMATION

We encourage you to submit your application and supporting material as early as possible. The deadlines to complete the Early Decision application are November 6, 2020 (Round I) and January 8, 2021 (Round II). The priority deadline to submit applications for the regular decision cycle is February 15, 2021; applications may be submitted after the priority deadline.

The application must be submitted electronically through LSAC. For information on applying, contact LSAC at 215.968.1001 or LSAC.org . Review the application checklist and instructions available through LSAC and on our website at https://law.duke.edu/apply/jd.

Application Processing Fee

The non-refundable application processing fee is $80 and must be submitted electronically with the application.

Automatic fee waivers: Our application fee will be waived automatically if you received a waiver of the fees associated with taking the LSAT. We do not offer service-related fee waivers (e.g., military, Teach for America, Americorps, etc.).

Need-based fee waivers: Need-based fee waivers are granted one-time-only. Visit our website to download the Fee Waiver form. We will be unable to consider requests received after the priority application deadline of February 15. Only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible. A decision on your need-based fee waiver request must be received prior to submitting the application, so plan ahead. If you submit the application prior to receiving a decision, your fee waiver request will be denied. Notification will be sent by email.

We also extend merit-based fee waivers based on the results of periodic searches of the LSAC's Candidate Referral Service (CRS). To be considered in the pool, be sure your CRS account is active, your intended enrollment year is set correctly, you have either a self-reported or LSAC-calculated GPA, and LSAT/LSAT-Flex score.

Résumé, Personal Statement, Optional Essays

Résumé : You will be required to submit a current résumé as an attachment. Please provide complete information and include your significant work experience, educational history, college and community activities, honors and awards you have received, any prior Duke affiliation, and dates for all items listed. There is no required length or page limit.

Personal Statement : You will be required to submit a personal statement as an attachment. The statement is your opportunity to introduce yourself to the admissions committee and should include (1) what you think have been your significant personal experiences beyond what may be reflected in your academic transcripts and on your résumé, and (2) your personal and career ambitions. If your personal statement does not directly address your interest in attending law school and practicing law, we strongly encourage you to write Optional Essay 1. There is no required length or page limit.

Optional Essays : You are invited to supplement your personal statement with either or both of the following optional essays. These topics are helpful in forming a full picture of our applicants so we encourage you to provide any relevant information either in your personal statement or in the optional essays (it is not necessary to duplicate information in both places). There is no required length or page limit.

Optional Essay 1 : You may submit an essay providing additional information about why you have chosen to apply to law school in general and Duke in particular. We are interested in the factors that have prompted your interest in a legal career and the ways in which you think Duke can further that interest.

Optional Essay 2 : Our admission process is guided by the view that a student body that reflects the broad diversity of society contributes to the implementation of the Law School’s mission, improves the learning process, and enriches the educational experience for all students. In reviewing applications, we consider, as one factor among many, how an applicant may contribute to the diversity of the Law School based on the candidate’s experiences, achievements, background, and perspectives. This approach ensures the best and most relevant possible legal training and serves the legal profession by training lawyers to effectively serve an increasingly diverse society. You are invited to submit an essay that describes your particular life experiences with an emphasis on how the perspectives that you have acquired would contribute to Duke Law School’s intellectual community and enhance the diversity of the student body. Examples of topics include (but are not limited to): an experience of prejudice, bias, economic disadvantage, personal adversity, or other social hardship (perhaps stemming from one’s religious affiliation, disability, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity); experience as a first-generation college student; significant employment history (such as in business, military or law enforcement, or public service); experience as an immigrant or refugee; graduate study; or impressive leadership achievement (including college or community service).

The personal statement, optional essays, and all other writing samples must be your own work. This means that the ideas and expressions originated with you, and you wrote all drafts and the final product. It does not preclude asking family members, friends, pre-law advisors, and others for proofreading assistance or general feedback.

LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

All applicants must register with the LSAC CAS available at LSAC.org . Shortly after you submit the application, we will request your CAS report from LSAC. LSAC will release your CAS report once they process the required transcripts and a minimum of two recommendation letters.

Recommendation Letters

Two recommendation letters are required and must be submitted through LSAC. The LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service is included in your CAS registration and will accept up to four generic or school specific letters.

Unless you have been out of school for some time, at least one letter should come from an academic instructor who has personal knowledge of your performance and potential. A second letter should come from someone who can address your interpersonal skills, leadership, and involvement, such as a supervisor or advisor from a job, internship, or student organization. Additional letters from either source may also be submitted. If you have been out of school for long enough that an academic reference is not available, you may submit an additional employment letter in its place.

References from friends, family friends, and relatives are discouraged.

Standardized Testing

All applicants must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Duke Law School does not prefer one test to the other, and either will be given equal consideration as part of a holistic review of the application. Scores for both exams are valid for five years and applicants must have all valid scores from either test submitted. If applicants take the LSAT, all valid scores must be submitted regardless of whether or not GRE scores are also submitted. (However, an applicant who has taken both tests may decide to only have LSAT scores submitted and not GRE scores.)

You should choose a test date that provides sufficient time for thorough preparation, preferably so the score will be available by the February 15 priority deadline. Other tests are available for those who decide to apply to law school later in the cycle, or for those who wish to retake the test. Duke considers all test scores that are submitted in the context of the entire application (transcripts, personal statement, letters of recommendation, evidence of leadership and engagement, and other information). If you feel that one or more of your test scores does not accurately reflect your ability or potential, please use the Miscellaneous Addendum attachment to explain this disparity.

LSAT, LSAT-Flex, Writing Sample

Contact LSAC to request information about the LSAT/LSAT-Flex at 215.968.1001 or LSAC.org . We will request your CAS report from LSAC, which will include the test scores.

You may submit the application prior to taking (or retaking) the LSAT and we will hold your file until the appropriate score is available. If you are planning to retake the LSAT, and you would like to have your file placed on hold to wait on the new score to be considered during the evaluation process, select the date that you will retake the LSAT in the appropriate section on the application. Notify the Office of Admissions if you decide to retake the LSAT after you submit the application and you would like to have your file placed on hold.

LSAC may release your CAS report without the writing portion of the LSAT (LSAT Writing); however, the writing sample will be required to complete your Duke Law School application.

Visit https://www.ets.org/gre for GRE registration and information. You will be required to request Educational Testing Service (ETS) to send an official copy of your scores to Duke University School of Law - institution code 4916 . Notify the Office of Admissions by email ( [email protected] ) if the name on your application is different from the name on your score report. You do not need to notify us about minor differences in spacing or hyphenation (such as "Juan Carlos" vs. "JuanCarlos" or "Jane Henry Doe" vs. "Jane Henry-Doe").

We do not accept expired scores, personal copies of scores, or attested or notarized score reports.

Academic Transcripts

Transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work must be submitted directly to the CAS.

Foreign Transcripts - Duke Law School requires that foreign transcripts be submitted through the CAS if you received your degree from an institution outside the U.S. or Canada, or if you completed the equivalent of more than one year of undergraduate study outside the U.S. (including its territories) or Canada. This service is included in the CAS registration fee. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your LSAC CAS report. Log in to your online account and follow the instructions for registering for the service. Be sure to print out a Transcript Request Form for each institution and send it promptly to them. Additional time is usually required to receive foreign transcripts, so please plan accordingly. Questions about foreign transcripts can be directed to LSAC at 215.968.1001 or [email protected] .

International Applicants Initial Interview or TOEFL Requirements

If your first language is not English and English is not the language of instruction at your undergraduate institution, you are required to participate in an InitialView interview or have your Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score submitted. If you choose to conduct an interview, please notify the Office of Admissions by email when it is ready for our review . International applicants with graduate degrees in the U.S. must also satisfy this requirement. We strongly recommend that candidates interview in lieu of having the TOEFL score submitted.

  • To participate in the interview, please schedule your session by contacting InitialView at www.initialview.com . Since many international students come from educational systems that are different from that of the U.S., we find it valuable to be able to view an unscripted interview where applicants may discuss their unique backgrounds and goals. InitialView will conduct the interview, record the conversation, and notify our office once the interview is available. All InitialView interviews must be completed no later than March 1.
  • Contact Educational Testing Service (ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be sent to LSAC - institution code 8395 . Your score will be included in the International Credential Evaluation document that will be part of your LSAC CAS report.

International Students and Visa Applications

Admitted applicants who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents will receive information about applying for a Duke-sponsored F-1 visa after submitting the required enrollment material. Candidates will be required to submit copies of their passports, previous visa documents, and proof of financial support. Duke University policy states that graduate and professional students who are not in lawful immigration status will not be enrolled.

Previous Law School Matriculation

If you attended another law school, you must include an addendum to explain why you did not complete the program. You are also required to have your law school submit a letter directly to the Office of Admissions indicating your dates of attendance, reason for withdrawal, and academic standing.

Application Review

The application review process includes a thorough evaluation of a candidate's academic record, including the rigor and breadth of the curriculum, overall grade trends, any graduate level work, and test scores. To be eligible for admission, an applicant must receive a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution prior to enrollment at the Law School.

Duke Law School seeks to identify applicants who demonstrate leadership and engagement. Most successful candidates show sustained and meaningful commitment to one or more fields of interest to them. Although many applicants have had some exposure to the legal profession, this is not in itself a requirement. The Law School benefits from a student body that represents a broad range of experiences and interests. It is often helpful to indicate reasons for interest in law school in general and Duke in particular, especially when they relate to an applicant's specific experiences. Special care is taken when evaluating applicants to achieve diversity in interests, perspectives, and backgrounds.

Most offers of admission are typically made prior to March 15, and all decisions are completed by the end of April.

Supplemental Material

If you wish to send additional material after submitting the application, you may forward it to the Office of Admissions by email or postal mail. Include your full name and LSAC account number for identification purposes. If you have lengthy material, it may be more beneficial to submit a 1-2 page summary by email or submit the material by postal mail.

To reapply, you must submit a new application and update all supporting material. Note on the application, where indicated, the year for which you last sought admission. You will also be required to reassign recommendation letters through LSAC.

Bar Admission

In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners. For additional information, please visit http://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/bar_admissions.html .

Non-Discrimination Policy

Duke University is committed to encouraging and sustaining a learning and work community that is free from prohibited discrimination and harassment. Visit https://oie.duke.edu/sites/default/files/atoms/files/duke-nondiscrimination-statement-2019-aug.pdf to learn more and review the full policy.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Please read the following instructions carefully before completing the application.

1: Biographical

Complete this section in full.

2: Demographics

3: additional demographics, 4: contact information.

Complete this section in full. Submit updates to your contact information directly to the Office of Admissions at [email protected].

5: Decision Cycle

Select the decision cycle in which you would like to have your application reviewed.

Early Decision : The Early Decision program is most appropriate for candidates who have concluded that Duke is their first choice for law school and who do not anticipate the need to compare offers of financial aid in making a decision about where to matriculate. Candidates who apply through the Early Decision program may apply to other law schools, but may not have more than one binding Early Decision application pending simultaneously. If an Early Decision application has already been submitted to another law school, candidates may apply through Duke's Early Decision program only if and when they are released from their binding commitment at the other school. If admitted to Duke Law School, Early Decision candidates will be required to immediately withdraw their applications at other law schools, refrain from submitting new applications, and submit a $500 tuition deposit no later than ten days after the admission notification.

Files for Round I Early Decision must be complete no later than November 6, 2020 and candidates will be notified about their status no later than December 31. Files for Round II Early Decision must be complete no later than January 8, 2021 and candidates will be notified no later than January 31. Please plan ahead if you intend to apply for the Early Decision cycle since it can take several days or weeks to complete your file. LSAC must process all required transcripts and the two required recommendation letters before they will release the CAS report. Depending on the volume, it could take LSAC several weeks to process material received.

Some Early Decision candidates may be held for consideration in the regular cycle, and will no longer be bound by the terms of the Early Decision agreement. Visit our website for additional information on the Early Decision cycle.

Regular Decision : The priority deadline to submit the application for the regular decision cycle is February 15.

6: Degree Program

Review the degree options listed below. You may apply to only one program. Admission to one program is not transferable to another. Visit our website for additional information on degree programs offered.

JD - No additional requirements

JD/LLM (International and Comparative Law) - No additional requirements; however, we encourage you to address your interest in international and comparative law either in your personal statement or use the JD/LLM or JD/LLMLE attachment.

JD/LLMLE (Law and Entrepreneurship) - No additional requirements; however, we encourage you to address your interest in law and entrepreneurship either in your personal statement or use the JD/LLM or JD/LLMLE attachment.

When applying to the following dual degree programs, you are also required to submit a separate application to the appropriate Duke University graduate or professional school. Contact the graduate or professional school directly to obtain application and admission requirements. Please do not select one of these programs if you are not applying concurrently to both Duke schools.

JD/MBA - Requires separate application to Duke Fuqua School of Business JD/MD - Requires separate application to Duke School of Medicine JD/MEM - Requires separate application to Duke Nicholas School of the Environment JD/MPP - Requires separate application to Duke Sanford School of Public Policy JD/MTS - Requires separate application to Duke Divinity School

7: Prior Application

Complete this section in full. If you applied previously, please indicate the year(s) for which you applied for admission.

8: Standardized Testing (See General Information for details.)

LSAT/LSAT-Flex

Please provide the test date if you will be retaking the LSAT or LSAT-Flex and you want the new score to be considered during the evaluation process.

Please indicate if you will have GRE scores submitted.

International applicants only, if applicable. Indicate whether you will participate in an InitialView interview or submit a TOEFL score. We strongly recommend that candidates interview in lieu of having the TOEFL score submitted.

9: Education

You are required to provide information on your high school and all post secondary schools attended.

10: Employment

11: military service, 13: character and fitness.

Duke Law requires that you reveal knowledge of all disciplinary charges, and any arrests, criminal charges, or criminal convictions (except arrests, criminal charges or criminal convictions that have been expunged from your record). When in doubt, you should err on the side of full disclosure as subsequent discovery of a failure to fully and accurately answer these questions may have serious consequences. You have an ongoing obligation to report any conduct that would require you to answer "Yes" to any of the questions in this section during the pendency of your application. If you are admitted, the obligation to report conduct applicable to the questions in this section continues until your first day of class at Duke Law School.

If you answer "Yes" to any of these questions, you will be required to provide an explanation. Include details, the current status of any disciplinary action or judicial sanctions, and the final resolution of the issues involved.

In addition, if you answer "Yes" to the disciplinary conduct question, you will be required to have the dean, registrar, department supervisor, judicial officer, or academic officer with access to official records from your institution submit a letter directly to the Office of Admissions providing complete information about the incident. If your institution has no record of any disciplinary conduct, please have them submit a letter indicating so.

14: Certification

By submitting an application for admission, I understand and agree that the personal data included with my application will be collected by Duke, or on its behalf, during the admissions process. I understand and agree that this data will be used for the primary purposes of considering my application for admission to Duke, providing me with information regarding engagement opportunities, evaluating my eligibility for financial aid, responding to records requests and, if I am admitted, facilitating my education. To help achieve these goals or to comply with legal obligations, I agree that my data may be shared internally among different Duke departments and offices, or with Duke contracted or approved third parties. I have reviewed the Duke University Privacy Policy and permit Duke to collect and use my personal data in accordance with that policy.

Applications will not be processed without an electronic signature agreeing to the conditions and certifying that the information is true and complete. You are obligated to notify the Office of Admissions immediately of any change in the information provided.

How to Contact Us

13 cornell university instructions.

JD Regular Decision

Application Instructions - Fall

Eligibility

Applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university (or the international equivalent).

Students matriculate in the fall semester on a full-time basis.

Applications are reviewed by our Admissions Committee in order of completion, but applicants may not be notified in that order. We recommend submitting your application as early as possible.

  • Online application available through LSAC on September 1
  • File and complete application by March 15
  • Notification by early May

Complete accuracy is required in all statements made on any portion of the application. To ensure that decisions are based on factual information, we audit applications randomly each year. In addition, you are required to update us about any changes that take place after the submission of your application. Inaccurate, incomplete, or misleading statements, or failure to update, can result in withdrawal of admission offers, honor code proceedings, dismissal from Cornell Law School, rescission or cancellation of any degrees you may have received from Cornell Law School or other disciplinary sanctions.

Note: Enrolled students must submit any updates to the character and fitness portion of the application by October 1 of the 1L (first year) of law school.

Note: In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

Required Documents:

The personal statement is your opportunity to highlight anything about yourself that may help our Admissions Committee reach its decision. The topic is up to you, but the goal is for us to learn aspects of your background that may not be revealed in other elements of your application. The personal statement should be limited to two pages.

Provide your education, all work experience (full-time, part-time, summer), scholastic honors received, and any extracurricular and/or community activities while in college and/or since graduation.

Standardized Testing Options:

Law School Admission Test (LSAT);

Graduate Record Examination (GRE), score reporting code 2456;

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), score reporting code 5JW-8V-77;

Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT); American College Test (ACT) 3 Plus 3 program only

If you plan to apply with the LSAT, you must take the test no later than February 2021 to meet the March 1 deadline. GRE/GMAT scores must be available to us by our March 1 deadline.

Credential Assembly Service Report (CAS)

You are required to register with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service. Official transcripts from each college or university that you attended must be submitted to LSAC for analysis and distribution to us (this process may take several weeks).

Two letters of recommendation are required and must be submitted through LSAC's Letter of Recommendation Service . Academic recommendations are preferred as we are primarily interested in the recommender's judgment about your academic abilities and potential for success in the legal profession. If you have been out of school for two or more years, letters from a current or recent employer are acceptable.

* Access to recommendations: Federal legislation gives enrolled students the right of access to letters of recommendation submitted in support of their applications. Your decision will not influence the Admissions Committee's decision.*

Applicants With Foreign Credentials and/or Nonimmigrant Visas

If all undergraduate course work was completed at institutions outside the United States (including its territories), we require that your foreign transcripts be submitted through LSAC's Credential Assembly Service (CAS). If you completed any postsecondary work outside the U.S. (including its territories), you must use this service for transcript evaluation and authentication of your foreign transcripts. An exception to this requirement is if you completed the coursework through a study-abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. Transcript evaluation is included in the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) registration fee. A Foreign Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) and will be incorporated into your law school report. Questions about the Credential Assembly Service should be directed to www.lsac.org .

Interviews are optional and extended by invitation of our Admissions Committee only. If you receive an interview invitation, detailed instructions will be provided at that time.

Visiting the School

Law School tours and class visits can be scheduled by visiting our portal , by emailing us at [email protected] or by calling 607-255-5141. If you are unable to travel to Ithaca, we may be visiting a location near you. Our recruiting schedule can be found here .

Application deadline: March 1

A complete application consists of:

  • LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Registration
  • Standardized Test - LSAT/GRE/GMAT
  • SAT/ACT (3 Plus 3 program only)
  • Electronic application submitted through LSAC
  • Receipt of $80 application fee
  • Academic transcripts disseminated by CAS
  • Two letters of recommendation to LSAC for processing

Cornell University has an enduring commitment to support equality of education and employment opportunity by affirming the value of diversity and by promoting an environment free from discrimination. Cornell Law School is committed to Cornell University's policy affirming equality of opportunity:

No person shall be denied admission to any educational program or activity or be denied employment on the basis of any legally prohibited discrimination involving, but not limited to such factors as race, color, creed, religion, national or ethnic origin, marital status, citizenship, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability, or protected veteran status.

14 Georgetown University Instructions

Instructions: georgetown university law center.

The following provides general Law Center admissions information. For additional details and the most current information on the application process, visit our website at https://www.law.georgetown.edu/admissions-aid/. Please contact the Office of Admissions at [email protected] if you have any questions or need assistance in submitting an application.

EVALUATION PROCESS

The Admissions Committee takes into consideration a number of factors when evaluating whether a candidate would be suitable for admission. These factors include whether the person is likely to succeed at Georgetown, would benefit from a legal education here, and could contribute to the Georgetown Law community. In making such determinations, the Committee focuses on a number of criteria and does not use numerical cut-offs. In addition to examining the applicant's Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), and/or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score(s) and academic record, the Committee also considers the personal statement, letter(s) of recommendation and/or evaluation(s), choice of major, nature and difficulty of course selection, extracurricular activities, graduate work, contributions to the community, and professional experience.

The Law Center welcomes applications from students with disabilities and endeavors to meet their special needs.

ENTERING CLASS OF 2019

Applicants : 10,366

Enrolled : 518 Full-Time / 55 Part-Time

Median LSAT : 168

25% / 75% : 163 / 169

Median GPA : 3.78

25% / 75% : 3.55 / 3.89

Students of Color : 28%

Women : 52%

TUITION RATES — 2020-2021

Full-Time Law Center Students : $66,872 (per academic year)

Part-Time Law Center Students : $47,760 (per academic year) *Entering Part-Time students carry 20 credits for the first year.

CHOICE OF APPLICATION PROCESS

* Due to the large number of applications we receive and our rolling admissions process, candidates are strongly encouraged to complete their applications as early as possible. Applications will not be reviewed until all required documentation has been received.

1) Early Decision (Binding)

The Early Decision process is designed for those who have already researched their law school options and are certain that Georgetown Law is their first choice of schools. This process allows such applicants a means of expressing to the Admissions Committee their commitment to attend Georgetown, if admitted. Early Decision applications are given priority review in our rolling admissions process.

Although candidates admitted under Early Decision are committed to attending Georgetown, and will not receive their financial aid information before their admissions decision, please be assured that you will be considered for merit scholarships and need-based financial aid in the same manner, and on the same timeline, as all other admitted students. If you need to know your full financial aid package prior to being committed to attending Georgetown, we recommend that you apply under Regular Decision.

Early Decision is binding. Because offers of admission extended under the Early Decision process are binding, candidates may not apply to other law schools under similar Early Decision processes. However, if your application is deferred or denied or if you are placed on a waitlist, you are no longer bound by Georgetown Law's Early Decision commitment and are encouraged to proceed with your applications at other law schools. Georgetown encourages all applicants to apply as early as possible.

Please be certain to complete the "Early Decision" application, which indicates your intention to apply under this process.

If your Early Decision application is complete by February 1, the Admissions Committee will review your application within 4 weeks of the date your application becomes complete and your admissions decision will be communicated shortly thereafter. If your Early Decision application is completed after February 1, the Admissions Committee will expedite review of your application, but will not guarantee a decision within 4 weeks of completion.

2) Regular Decision (Non-Binding)

The strongly recommended application deadline for all applicants (Full-Time or Part-Time) is March 1. Candidates are notified as soon as decisions are reached, usually 8-12 weeks after your file is complete with all required documentation.

STATUS CHECK

For your convenience, we have established a status check feature that allows you to determine if your application is complete. Once your application is received, our office will email you instructions on how to access this feature.

REQUIREMENTS

1.) Completed application form

2.) Non-refundable $85 application fee

3.) * Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT):* All applicants for admission to Georgetown Law are required to take one of the following standarized tests: the LSAT/LSAT Flex, GRE, or GMAT. All standardized test scores must be within the last 5 years in order to be considered valid. Candidates submitting a GRE score should follow the reportable history guidelines outlined here and must have their official score report sent directly to Georgetown Law. Georgetown Law's institution code is 2329. Candidates submitting a GMAT score should follow the reportable history guidelines outlined here and must have their score report sent directly to Georgetown Law. Georgetown Law's school code is JT7-JB-84.

4.) Personal Statement: An applicant may write a double-spaced personal statement on any subject of importance that he or she feels will assist the Admissions Committee in its decision. There is no minimum/maximum length requirement.

5.) Recommendations and/or Evaluations: Georgetown Law requires only one letter of recommendation or evaluation to apply to the J.D. program, although additional letters or evaluations will be accepted. If possible, recommendations/evaluations should be completed by faculty members with personal knowledge of the applicant's academic work. Recommendations/evaluations from employers are also acceptable. We recommend that letters be submitted through LSAC's Letter of Recommendation Service, included with your Credential Assembly Service (CAS) registration subscription. Individual letters may, however, be sent directly to Georgetown Law by the recommender.

6.) Résumé: Please prepare a résumé describing: 1) schools attended, dates of attendance, and degree(s) awarded; 2) work experience, including employer, position, nature of work, and dates of employment; 3) extracurricular/community activities, including nature and length of involvement; and 4) scholastic honors, including academic awards, scholarships, or fellowships.

7.) Transcripts/CAS: All applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) at LSAC.org . A transcript from all colleges or universities attended must then be sent directly to CAS, not to Georgetown Law. We strongly encourage candidates who have received their undergraduate degree from an institution outside the United States to have credentials sent to LSAC to be analyzed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers ( www.aacrao.org ).

8.) Dean's Certification form (required if admitted)

GLOBAL LAW SCHOLARS PROGRAM

Entering First-Year J.D. Students (Full-Time only)

March 1st Deadline

Global Law Scholars are selected based upon prior academic record, articulated goals — both personal and professional — as they relate to the study of transnational law and legal practice, and demonstrated proficiency in a second language. For additional information, please visit https://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/transnational-programs/global-law-scholars-program/

NOTE: The Global Law Scholars Committee begins to consider applicants for the program on or around March 1st and only individuals who have been admitted to the Law Center by that date are eligible for selection at that time. Applications received after the deadline will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Applying early is encouraged. The required application form and the Foreign Language Evaluation Form are available at https://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/transnational-programs/global-law-scholars-program/prospective-students/how-to-apply/. If you plan on using the paper application forms instead of the online application, they should be submitted to the address listed on the forms.

BLUME PUBLIC INTEREST SCHOLARS PROGRAM

Entering First-Year J.D. Students (Full-Time and Part-Time eligible)

The Blume Public Interest Scholars program provides financial, professional and academic support to law students dedicated to practicing law in the public interest. In addition to scholarship assistance, the program offers summer stipends through the Office of Public Interest and Community Service (OPICS) . Blume Scholars are matched with faculty advisors and attorney mentors who practice in their field of interest. Blume Scholars are selected based upon prior experience, career goals, and academic record — both personal and professional — as they relate to the study and practice of public interest law.

NOTE: The Blume Public Interest Scholars Committee will consider applicants for the program on or around March 1, and only individuals who have been admitted to the Law Center by that date are eligible for selection at that time. There is no general Blume Public Interest Scholars application. Rather, admitted applicants with extensive public service experience and a demonstrated commitment to pursuing a public interest legal career will be invited to submit a brief application.

TECHNOLOGY LAW & POLICY SCHOLARS PROGRAM

The Technology Law & Policy Scholars program gives students the opportunity to engage in rigorous academic work, to develop their technological skills, and to deepen their understanding of policy debates related to new and emerging technologies. Technology Law Scholars are selected based upon prior academic record, experience and articulated goals — both personal and professional — as they relate to the study of technology law.

NOTE: The Technology Law Scholars Committee will consider applicants for the program on or around March 1, and only individuals who have been admitted to the Law Center by that date are eligible for selection at that time. Applications received after the deadline will be reviewed on a space-available basis. Applying early is encouraged. The required application form is available at http://www.georgetowntech.org/scholars.

BUSINESS LAW SCHOLARS PROGRAM

The Business Law Scholars program is designed to teach law students the fundamentals of business, management, and organization and aims to give them the business skills needed to practice law in the 21st century. Business Law Scholars are selected based upon prior academic record, experience and articulated goals — both personal and professional — as they relate to the study of business law.

NOTE: The Business Law Scholars Committee will consider applicants for the program on or around March 1, and only individuals who have been admitted to the Law Center by that date are eligible for selection at that time. The required application form is available at https://www.law.georgetown.edu/experiential-learning/business-law-scholars/.

JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS

15 university of california—los angeles instructions.

Admissions Policy **

**UCLA School of Law seeks to admit students of outstanding intellectual ability who will bring a wide range of backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives to the classroom and the legal profession. Through long experience, the faculty has concluded that the quality of the education of each student is affected in significant ways by the presence of vital, diverse viewpoints. Indeed, students of all backgrounds choose to come to UCLA in significant part because of the School of Law's outstanding achievements in creating a highly diverse educational environment.

In evaluating each applicant, the School of Law places substantial weight on traditional measures of academic ability, namely grades and standardized test scores, specifically Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores and Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) scores. We also recognize in our evaluation that other factors and attributes contribute greatly to a person's ability to succeed as a law student and lawyer. When assessing academic promise and achievement, the applicant's entire file will be considered, including whether economic, physical, or other challenges have been overcome; scholarly achievements such as graduate study, awards and publications; the rigor of the undergraduate educational program undertaken; and letters of recommendation.

The School of Law also considers attributes that may contribute to assembling a diverse class. We place special emphasis on socioeconomic disadvantage in our evaluation. We also consider work experience and career achievement, community or public service, career goals (with particular attention paid to the likelihood of the applicant representing underrepresented communities), significant hardships overcome, the ability to contribute to law school programs and specializations, evidence of and potential for leadership, language ability, unusual life experiences, and any other factors (except those factors deemed inadmissible by applicable law) that indicate the applicant may significantly diversify the student body or make a distinctive contribution to the School of Law or the legal profession. Many of the subjects we address on the application help us to assess the non-numeric aspects of the applicant's achievements that may also contribute to the strength of our educational environment and to the quality and leadership potential of our graduates.

UCLA School of Law has as one of its central purposes the training of attorneys who will attain high levels of professional excellence and integrity and who will exercise civic responsibility in myriad ways over long careers.

Admission to the First-Year Class **

**Applicants for admission to the professional curriculum of the School of Law, leading to the degree of Juris Doctor, must have received a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university or college of approved standing before they begin their work at the School of Law.

Students are admitted for the fall semester only. UCLA offers a three-year, full-time course of study. Evening, summer, or part-time programs are not offered.

Additional information on the law school and admissions criteria is available in the ABA-LSAC Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools , which is available through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC).

Full Tuition Scholarship Programs

The UCLA Law Distinguished Scholars Program is a binding early-decision program providing full tuition for three years to exceptionally qualified students ready to commit to UCLA Law. The deadline to apply to this program is November 16, 2020. Applicants must also take the LSAT or GRE no later than October 31, 2020 and must sign and submit the Distinguished Scholars Program Agreement included in the application. For more information, please visit: https://law.ucla.edu/admissions/jd-admissions/apply-now/full-tuition-programs#distinguished.

The UCLA Law Achievement Fellowship is a non-binding program that provides full tuition for three years to high-achieving students who have also overcome significant obstacles in life, such as socio-economic disadvantage, disability, being the first in their family to attend college, attending under-resourced schools, or other major hardships or challenges. The deadline to apply to this program is January 4, 2021. Applicants must also take the LSAT or the GRE no later than November 30, 2020. To apply, applicants are required to include an additional one page essay (by uploading it to their application) describing in detail the obstacles they have overcome in life and why they are a strong candidate for the program. For more information, please visit: https://law.ucla.edu/admissions/jd-admissions/apply-now/full-tuition-programs#achievement.

First-Year JD Application Requirements **

**All applicants for fall 2021 should follow these application procedures:

\1. Take the LSAT or the GRE no later than January 31, 2021. Note the cut off dates for the LSAT and GRE are different for students applying to the Early Decision, Distinguished Scholars and Achievement Fellowship programs (see below).

Students may choose which test to take; however please note the following guidelines:

An applicant who takes both the LSAT and the GRE is required to submit all LSAT test scores from the last five years but may choose whether or not to submit their GRE score(s). However if the applicant elects to submit a GRE score in addition to the LSAT, the applicant must submit all GRE scores from the last five years

An applicant who only takes the GRE and not the LSAT must also submit all GRE scores from the last five years.

GRE scores should be submitted directly to UCLA Law by the Educational Testing Service (“ETS”—the organization that administers the GRE) using UCLA Law’s ETS school code 4837 and department and major field code 5201.

Applicants applying only with a GRE score are still required to subscribe to and utilize the LSAC Credential Assembly Service for the submission of transcripts and letters of recommendation.

The LSAT writing sample will not be conducted at the same time as the LSAT exam—it will be an on-demand writing exam administered online. (For full details please visit: https://www.lsac.org/lsat/taking-lsat/lsat-writing-faqs.) Note that we will review applications as soon as they are complete and at least one LSAT writing sample has been submitted. Unfortunately, we are not able to wait to review your application if you decide to take additional writing sample tests.

\2. Register with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service (CAS).

\3. Submit the following:

Completed application.

Personal statement (use an electronic attachment).

Separate essay not to exceed two double-spaced typed pages.

No less than 11-point font.

In the "Attachments" tab, under "Personal Statement," please upload this separate essay. In this essay, you may discuss any matters relevant to your ability to succeed in law school and the practice of law and any attributes, experiences, or interests that would enable you to make a distinctive contribution to UCLA Law or the legal profession.

Current résumé (use an electronic attachment).

Two letters of recommendation (no more than two) submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service are required.

Official transcripts sent directly to LSAC. Applicants should not wait for fall grades before sending transcripts to LSAC. However, applicants must submit work completed after the initial registration to LSAC, as updated reports will be forwarded to the Law School Admissions Office. Accepted applicants will be required to have their undergraduate institution submit directly to UCLA School of Law a final transcript showing the award of a baccalaureate degree before classes begin in the fall semester.

Nonrefundable application fee in the amount of $75. You may submit your application and pay the fee electronically via LSAC. You may also pay by check, money order, or international money order payable to "The Regents of the University of California" and include it with your signed Payment Certification Form, which can be found under the "Forms" tab.

David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy Application, if applying to the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy. Go to the “Attachments” tab to submit your essay.

Early Decision Program Agreement, if applying to the Binding Early Decision Program. The priority Early Decision deadline is November 16, 2020. Students applying priority Early Decision must take the LSAT or GRE by October 31, 2020. Applicants will be informed of their admissions decisions by the end of December 2020. Students applying Early Decision after November 16 must take the LSAT or GRE by January 31, 2021 and will receive decisions on a rolling basis. Go to the “Forms” tab to access the agreement.

Distinguished Scholars Program Agreement, if applying to the Distinguished Scholars Program. The deadline is November 16, 2020 and applicants must take the LSAT or GRE no later than October 31, 2020. Go to the “Forms” tab to access the agreement.

If applying to the Achievement Fellowship Program, applicants are required to include an additional one page essay describing in detail the obstacles they have overcome in life and why they are a strong candidate for the program. The deadline to apply to the Achievement Fellowship is January 4, 2021 and applicants must take the LSAT or the GRE no later than November 30, 2020. Go to the “Attachments” tab to submit the Achievement Fellowship essay.

\4. We do not require a dean's certification.

\5. Applications must be submitted on or before February 1, 2021.

Fee Waivers **

**Our fee waiver policy is outlined here .

Letters of Recommendation **

**UCLA School of Law requires that applicants submit two letters of recommendation. At least one letter should be from someone familiar with the applicant's academic work, if at all possible. The Law School strongly prefers that letters be submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. This service is included with the Credential Assembly Service registration. Letters will be copied and sent to UCLA School of Law along with the LSAC Law School Report. To use this service, follow the directions for submitting letters outlined at LSAC.org .

Internationally-Educated Applicants **

**UCLA School of Law requires that your transcripts be submitted through LSAC's Credential Assembly Service. This service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration fee. If you completed any postsecondary work outside the U.S. (including its territories) or Canada, you must use this service for the evaluation of your transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is if you completed the work through a study-abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcripts.

To use the Credential Assembly Service, log into your LSAC.org account and follow the instructions for registering for the service. Be sure to print out a Transcript Request Form for each institution and send it promptly to them. More time is usually required to receive international transcripts.

Questions about the Credential Assembly Service can be directed to LSAC at: (215) 968.1001 or [email protected] .

UCLA School of Law will request the applicant's law school report with LSAT score(s), if any, from LSAC. All internationally-educated applicants must take the LSAT or the GRE, but are not required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Change of Contact Information **

**If there is a change in the applicant's contact information after filing the application, the UCLA Law Admissions Office must be notified by sending an e-mail with the applicant's name and LSAC account number to: [email protected] or by writing to:

UCLA School of Law Law Admissions Office 71 Dodd Hall Box 951445 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1445

**Notification

Applicants will be notified by e-mail when: **

  • the application has been received;
  • the application has been marked complete; and
  • when an admission decision has been made.

The Office of Admissions should be advised of any change to the applicant's e-mail address. The majority of applicants will receive an admission decision by the end of April 2021.

The School of Law considers requests to defer enrollment on a case-by-case basis. To apply, applicants should contact the Office of Admissions.

Joint Degree **

Applicants to approved joint-degree programs must contact the appropriate graduate school or department to obtain its application and must meet that department's deadline. For more information on joint degree programs, click here .

**All J.D./Ph.D. in Philosophy applicants are advised to take the LSAT or GRE by November 30, 2020 and apply by January 10, 2021.

Reapplication **

**Applicants who reapply for admission must comply with the following procedures:

  • Complete a current application.
  • Pay the nonrefundable application fee in the amount of $75. You may submit your application and pay the fee electronically via LSAC. You may also pay by check, money order, or international money order payable to the "Regents of the University of California" and include it with your signed Payment Certification Form which can be found under the "Forms" tab.
  • Have a valid LSAT or GRE score.
  • Reregister with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service.

Note that the original application materials, including letters of recommendation, will remain on file. It is strongly suggested that a reapplicant submit an updated personal statement and résumé.

Fall 2021 Financial Aid Checklist for First-Year JD Applicants

  • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA); priority filing date is March 2, 2021.
  • UCLA School of Law requires that both the student's and parents' information be provided on the FAFSA.
  • The FAFSA can be obtained at www.fafsa.ed.gov . UCLA School of Law Code: 001315.

16 University of Texas at Austin Instructions

Admission policies.

To be considered for admissions as a first-year student, an applicant must register with the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) and the Credential Assembly Service (CAS), take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and demonstrate that they have earned a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. university, or the foreign equivalent whose program has been deemed of comparable quality, prior to the start of the first fall semester at Texas Law. Further, all applicants must have achieved a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 2.20, as calculated by LSAC (unless the applicant was enrolled as an undergraduate under the Academic Fresh Start option pursuant to Section 51.931 of the Texas Education Code).

  • September 1 : Application opens
  • November 1 : Early Decision deadline
  • March 1 : Regular Decision deadline

For all deadlines, the applicant must have a valid LSAT and/or GRE score received in order to be evaluated for admission. These deadlines are non-negotiable.

Standardized Tests

  • LSAT : Texas Law will consider all LSAT scores for the past five years and will report the highest score to the American Bar Association.
  • GRE : Applicants who are submitting a GRE score should request scores for the past five years from Educational Testing Service (ETS) using code 2717.

Please note that the most recent score must still be valid at the start of the semester for which you are applying.

*Early Decision Admission*

Texas Law offers a binding Early Decision (ED) admission program. This program is designed only for those applicants who have carefully determined that Texas Law is their top choice and should they be admitted, the applicant agrees to withdraw pending law school applications from further consideration and decline any other admission offers immediately. An admitted ED applicant will be required to submit an enrollment deposit and Letter of Intent (LOI). If that applicant does not submit the deposit and LOI by the deadline or fails to comply with the other program requirements, the admission offer will be withdrawn, and the applicant will no longer be considered for enrollment during the current admission cycle. All applicants who elect to apply under the ED program must agree to the ED Binding Admission Agreement portion of this application.

Dual Degree Applicants

The University of Texas at Austin offers a number of graduate and professional degree programs that applicants may pursue dual enrollment. Students interested in pursuing a dual degree must apply to and be accepted by the law school and the other degree program independently.

Statement of Non-Discrimination and Equal Education Opportunity

The University of Texas at Austin is committed to an educational and working environment that provides equal opportunity to all members of the university community. In accordance with federal and state laws, The University of Texas at Austin does not discriminate on the basis of gender in recruitment or admissions and prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, citizenship and veteran status. Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression is also prohibited pursuant to university policy. For more information, please visit here .

Applicant Responsibility and Accuracy of Information

Applicants are under a continued obligation to notify the law school immediately of any and all circumstances and events that may occur from the date an application is submitted to the first day of enrollment that may change any of the responses to their application. Texas Law reserves the right to rescind an offer of admission if the candidate fails to maintain satisfactory scholastic standing for work in progress, if final records fail to show completion of courses and/or degrees required for admission or if the admission decision was based on incomplete, inaccurate, omitted or misleading information furnished by the applicant. In addition, the law school may also report its findings to LSAC's Misconduct and Irregularities Committee.

Character and Moral Fitness

Applicants who have been convicted of a felony or other serious crime are eligible for admission into the law school; however, because state bar associations often prohibit persons with criminal records from being admitted to the bar regardless of their degrees or training, it may be impossible for such individuals to practice in some states.

In addition to the bar examination, there are character, fitness and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners .

Application Procedures

To apply for admission, please submit the following required materials:

Application Fee : A $70 non-refundable application fee will be collected through LSAC at the time the application is submitted.

Personal Statement : The personal statement is your opportunity to tell the Admissions Committee more about your interests, as well as the important experiences and aspects of yourself not otherwise apparent from your résumé and academic record. Your personal statement demonstrates to the Admissions Committee not only how you write - a skill fundamental to success in the legal profession - but also how you think and how you have reflected upon and derived meaning from your life experiences. Although there is no specific topic or question for the personal statement, your narrative should at some point address your decision to pursue a legal education. Your personal statement may not exceed two (2) double-spaced pages with a minimum 11-point font size and 1-inch margins.

Résumé : Please provide a résumé detailing any significant vocational, extracurricular, or community activities; graduate work or degree; honors and awards; any service in the Armed Forces; job descriptions and major areas of responsibility, along with location (city and state) and dates of employment; publications, or other information that you believe the Admissions Committee should consider in evaluating your application. Your résumé may not exceed three (3) pages.

Letters of Recommendation : Two (2) letters of recommendation (LORs) are required. These letters should be submitted directly to LSAC using their Letters of Recommendation Service .

An application will be considered complete and ready for review only when all of the required items have been received. It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure all application materials have been submitted and received at the law school.

Optional Materials

Applicants may submit one or more of the following optional statements to provide to the Admissions Committee additional insight when reviewing their application. Each optional statement may not exceed one (1) double-spaced page with a minimum 11-point font size and 1-inch margins.

Statement of Economic, Social, or Personal Background : Texas Law is interested in specifically learning about an applicant’s economic, social, and/or personal background that may not be apparent in the rest of the application or shared in the applicant’s personal statement. The committee recognizes that ordinary predictive measures for academic success might be of less value if prior performance has been partly the result of other contributing factors. An applicant may choose to describe the challenges as a first-generation college graduate; an applicant's struggle with a serious physical or mental disability; an applicant's encounter with discrimination based on race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or national origin; or an applicant's limited educational opportunities due to geographical or other restrictions; or whatever the applicant believes is appropriate and relevant. The committee believes factors such as these may contribute to an applicant's academic potential and how they will enhance the richness and diversity of the learning environment.

Undergraduate Performance : If your academic performance for one or more academic terms was markedly different from that of others, please explain. Please make any other comments about your college transcript(s) or your preparation for college that you believe will help the Admissions Committee in evaluating your application.

Standardized Test Performance : Candidates sometimes seek to establish that their academic potential is inaccurately reflected by standardized tests or that one LSAT or GRE score is more representative than another. If you believe this to be true in your case, please explain.

Interview Opportunity

During the application process, the Admissions Committee may invite you to complete an online interview as part of your evaluation. These interviews are conducted by invitation only. If you are invited to participate, we will contact you directly with instructions on how to access and complete the interview.

For any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us at:

The University of Texas School of Law 727 E. Dean Keeton Street Austin, TX 78705

17 Washington University in St. Louis Instructions

Nstructions: washington university school of law, admission information.

The application may be sent electronically through the LSAC website.

Requirements for Admission

To be admitted as a JD candidate, the applicant must have earned a bachelor's degree, or the equivalent, from an accredited college or university prior to enrolling in the School of Law. The applicant also must demonstrate their capacity for the study of law as evidenced by a competent undergraduate record and superior performance on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the GRE Test. If the applicant has taken both the LSAT and the GRE, the LSAT score will be given precedence.

Law School Admission Council

The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) administers the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Washington University School of Law requires that applicants register with LSAC in order that a CAS report may be sent to the law school should they decide to matriculate. Applicants may apply to Washington University School of Law electronically through the LSAC website, LSAC.org , or through our website at https://law.wustl.edu/.

Application Procedure

First-year students are admitted for full-time study in the fall only. The School of Law has no program for part-time or evening study, although exceptions can be made for students with disabilities and for some students providing primary care for their children.

Each applicant is advised that there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar, and the applicant is encouraged to determine, prior to matriculation, what those requirements are in the state(s) in which the applicant intends to practice.

Binding Early Decision Program

Our Early Decision Program is a highly competitive and binding admittance program designed for candidates who have researched law schools carefully. Applicants admitted under the binding Early Decision Program will be considered for all available scholarship awards. The admissions committee considers strong credentials, as reflected in LSAT or GRE scores; undergraduate performance; and a wide variety of skills and experiences that will enrich our diverse community and enhance the classroom discussion. Applicants admitted through the Early Decision Program are awarded the strongest scholarship available to them as part of the Class of 2024.

Early Decision Program applicants will receive a decision and, if admitted, notification of any scholarship award within two weeks of submitting their application, resume, personal statement, and transcript(s), as well as completing a personal interview with the Office of Admissions. Applicants admitted through the Early Decision Program are granted two business days to accept their offer of admission and any scholarship award. After accepting their offer, Early Decision Admitted Students are required to withdraw all applications at other law schools and may not initiate any new applications.

Applicants not admitted through the Early Decision Program are transferred to our Regular Decision Program. If applicants have questions about applying to the Early Decision Program, they can schedule a consultation with the Office of Admissions.

WashULaw does not have an application fee.

Two letters of recommendation are strongly encouraged. There is no specific form for letters of recommendation. The most helpful letters include commentary on specific examples of the applicant's academic ability, energy, motivation, discipline, character, and other qualitative variables. Washington University School of Law recommends that letters be submitted through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) Letter of Recommendation Service, which serves all member schools. This service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration. To use this service, follow the directions for submitting letters outlined on LSAC.org .

The Admissions Decision

Washington University School of Law takes a holistic approach to the admissions decision, considering strong credentials, as reflected in LSAT or GRE scores; undergraduate performance; and a wide variety of skills and experiences that will enrich our diverse community and enhance the classroom discussion. The interview process is a critical part of the holistic approach to the admissions process.

In addition to LSAT or GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and an undergraduate transcript, all applicants are also asked to submit a two- to three-page personal statement with an updated resume. Successful applicants often write about formative experiences or sources of personal motivation.

To ensure timely receipt of all email communications from the Admissions Office, we recommend applicants add [email protected] to their safe senders list to avoid important information being marked as spam.

We encourage all interested applicants to arrange a visit .

Final Transcripts

If the applicant has not completed their undergraduate degree, their acceptance by the School of Law is conditional pending satisfactory completion of work in progress and the fulfillment of the baccalaureate degree requirement for admission. Before registration in mid-August, the applicant must have their undergraduate school send a final, official transcript showing the degree earned and graduation date to the Admissions Office. Official final transcripts sent to the School of Law in the CAS report fulfill this requirement.

Tuition Deposits

If an applicant is admitted, they are required to reserve their seat in the incoming class with tuition deposits by deadlines communicated to them by the law school. Admitted applicants who fail to meet deadlines as specified may lose their reserved place in the class.

Class of 2024 Deposit Deadlines: April 15, 2021 at 5pm Central Time ($500, non-refundable) June 1, 2021 at 5pm Central Time ($500, non-refundable)

Reactivation Procedure

If an applicant is not admitted and wants to be reconsidered the following year, they must reapply for admission or request that the Office of Admissions reactivate their application for the next cycle. An updated CAS report is required.

Washington University welcomes applications from international students. Admitted international students are required to provide financial records documenting that funds are available for the cost of both law schoolattendance and living expenses in order to receive student visas. Washington University School of Law does not provide tuition waivers or graduate teaching assistantships to any applicants.

Electronic Applications

Washington University School of Law asks that applications be submitted electronically. This may be done directly through the LSAC website ( LSAC.org ) or by visiting the law school's website (https://law.wustl.edu/).

When an applicant submits an electronic application, they are automatically certifying the following:

By electronically transmitting this application, I hereby certify that the answers and statements contained in this application are true to the best of my knowledge and belief. I understand that a misrepresentation or omission may be grounds for revocation of an offer of acceptance or for dismissal. I agree to report in writing to the Admissions Office any changes in my responses that may occur after the filing of this application (excluding responses to the optional questions). If admitted, I will have an official transcript from my degree-granting undergraduate institution, showing the degree earned and its date, sent to the Admissions Office by August 1, preceding the start of my entering fall term. If I matriculate to Washington University, I will accept the responsibilities imposed by the Honor Code and abide by those principles.

Financial Aid Information

A request for financial aid has absolutely no bearing on the admission decision.

The School of Law makes every effort to meet the minimum financial needs of each enrolled student, but, because funds are limited, we cannot always accomplish this objective. Consistent with the policy of most professional schools, it is assumed that students will bear the primary cost burden of their educational expenses. Therefore, long-term loans are the primary source of financial assistance. Financial assistance is granted on an annual basis.

The sources of aid include federal loans, such as funds obtained under the Stafford Loan program, and the Graduate PLUS program. Merit-based scholarships are also sometimes available. To be eligible for loans, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the Washington University School of Law New Student Application for Financial Aid . To complete the FAFSA, visit www.fafsa.ed.gov . It takes approximately five working days for the FAFSA to issue the need analysis to the school. It is the sudent's responsibility to secure financial aid forms and to meet all deadlines.

Loans and scholarships are not awarded until applicants are admitted to the School of Law.

Merit Scholarships

The Law School offers Scholar in Law awards to admitted students with exceptional LSAT scores, GRE scores, and academic credentials regardless of financial need. No separate application or financial aid paperwork is needed to be considered for these merit-based scholarships.

Statement of Need (Scholarships)

Applicants may include a brief statement of financial need (addendum) explaining why they would benefit from being awarded a scholarship and why they are seeking aid. Is the applicant the first in their family to go to college? Are they from a disadvantaged background? Are they from an ethnic or social group that is underrepresented? This statement may be reviewed by the scholarship committee. The school considers all admitted applicants for scholarship.

Special Scholarships

There are also other types of scholarships available. For full descriptions, contact information, and deadlines for special scholarship programs available to Washington University School of Law applicants, please visit our website: https://law.wustl.edu/admissions/jd-admissions/scholarships-fellowships/.

Required Financial Aid Forms

  • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)—be sure to list Washington University (code number 002520) so the Law School receives the results of the need analysis.
  • Washington University School of Law Application for Financial Aid Form—available online at https://apps.law.wustl.edu/admissions/wuforms/FA_PersonalInfo.asp.

Washington University encourages and gives full consideration to all applicants for admission, financial aid, and employment. The University does not discriminate in access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, age, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, veteran status, disability or genetic information. Inquiries about compliance should be addressed to the University’s Vice Chancellor for Human Resources, Washington University, Campus Box 1184, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130.

18 University of Southern California Instructions

Admission to usc gould school of law.

What sets USC Gould School of Law students apart from their peers at other institutions? Extraordinary academic credentials and a rich diversity of background and experience in a law school with a small student body. USC Gould is a small law school on a large and vibrant campus, and the environment is both collaborative and supportive.

Each year, USC Gould receives many more applications than we have spaces in the entering class. With approximately 185 seats to fill in the entering class, admission is highly selective. Our priority application deadline is February 1, 2021 , but we will continue to accept applications through April 1, 2021 . Early applications receive priority review and scholarship consideration (although not necessarily a final decision). We strongly encourage you to submit your application by the February 1, 2021 priority deadline as historically there are very few remaining seats offered after that date.

Admissions Policy Statement

The primary goal of the admissions process is to enroll students who demonstrate outstanding academic and professional promise and whose background and experience will enhance the diversity of the student body or the profession, or will enrich the education environment of the USC Gould School of Law. USC Gould's admissions process is guided by the view that a student body which reflects the broad and rich diversity of our society provides a superior educational environment for all students.

To be eligible to apply, you must have received OR plan to receive a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university before enrolling at USC Gould. We base our admission decisions on academic record, LSAT and/or GRE score, personal statement, résumé, letters of recommendation, and other information in your application file.

USC Gould has a long tradition of striving to provide equal opportunity, and is firmly committed to a policy against discrimination based on ethnicity, national origin, disability, race, religion, political beliefs, gender, sexual orientation or gender identity, or age.

Our Admissions Committee

The Admissions and Financial Aid Committee is comprised of members of the faculty, the associate dean, the director of admissions, members of the admissions office, and an elected student representative. Members of the Committee read each application in the applicant pool thoroughly and considers each application on an individual basis. Committee members pay close attention to the "soft" factors, factors other than LSAT and/or GRE score(s) and undergraduate grade point average. All files are read at least twice.

Academic Requirements

In reviewing application files, the Committee focuses on college grades, academic major, selection of courses, and significant scholarly achievements. Although USC Gould does not require specific college courses for admission, we look favorably on students who have selected intellectually challenging courses of study.

Whatever your discipline, we urge you to concentrate on developing strong writing and analytical skills. Courses that require intensive research projects and active participation in classroom dialogue will also be helpful in preparing you to study law.

The Committee understands that the coronavirus pandemic led to an unprecedented spring 2020 semester for students enrolled in any type of degree program. Applicants will not be penalized for the variety of different grading systems that colleges may have adopted in response to the situation, this includes letter grades, P/NP, or CR/NC etc.

Standardized Test Requirement (LSAT and/or GRE)

USC Gould accepts both the LSAT and GRE as fulfillment of the standardized testing requirement for regular decision applicants. While we expect the vast majority of our applicants will continue to apply with only the LSAT, you may want to consider whether the GRE is a suitable alternative. Factors such as: plans for other graduate study, your application timeline, and whether you will apply to other law schools that accept ONLY the LSAT should be considered. Please review the following information to determine which test will best suit your application.

If you apply with an LSAT score, all LSAT/LSAT-FLEX scores will be reported. If you have both a LSAT and GRE score, you will be given the option of reporting your GRE score, but all LSAT/LSAT-FLEX scores taken in the last five years will be reported. If you apply with only a GRE score or choose to report your GRE score with your LSAT, all GRE scores for the last five years will be required.

To be considered for admission, you may take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) including the LSAT-FLEX. USC Gould will accept LSAT scores earned through the February 20, 2021 test administration for admission in Fall 2021. You may submit your application with a pending LSAT score and we will hold your file until it is complete. We will not review your file until all LSAT tests for which you have registered through February 2021 have posted scores. We consider all LSAT scores going back five years.

We report only your highest LSAT score to the American Bar Association (ABA) and other organizations. However, all scores will be considered in the application review process. If there is a significant discrepancy (four or more points) in your scores, we encourage you to address this variance in the Additional Questions section of the application to provide context for the Admissions Committee.

If you apply with an LSAT score , one LSAT Writing sample is required in order to complete your application. Your CAS report will not be transmitted to law schools without the LSAT Writing completed. We strongly encourage you to complete the LSAT Writing section prior to or soon after taking the LSAT. An application will not be held for a future LSAT Writing sample if one is already on file.

Graduate Records Exam (GRE) Score

The GRE is offered year-round. Please visit the ETS website for additional information. We require that you take the GRE by March 1, 2021; however, we strongly encourage your application be completed by the priority deadline of February 1, 2021. GRE scores are officially reported approximately two weeks after the test date. We will not consider GRE scores for tests taken after March 1, 2021. There will be no exceptions to this policy.

If you report your GRE score, you must submit all valid GRE test results going back to June 2015. You may not choose which results to share. This parallels the requirement that five years of LSAT scores be disclosed on the application. Just as with the LSAT, we will accept an explanation for discrepancies between multiple GRE scores in the Additional Questions section of the application. If you report your GRE score on the application, you will indicate the number of times you have taken the GRE, and you will be asked to report the date and score for your highest composite score. In order to facilitate the receipt of your GRE score(s), you must request that your score(s) be sent to USC Gould. The ETS school code for USC Gould School of Law is 4030. You are encouraged to make this request in advance of submitting your application or immediately thereafter, as your application will not be completed without this report and could cause a delay in your application becoming complete.

Your Personal Statement

Of the qualitative or "soft" factors of the application, the personal statement is of critical importance to the admissions committee. This is your primary opportunity to discuss who you are beyond the quantifiable components of your application. While there is no prompt and we encourage you to approach the personal statement with an open-mind, we are particularly interested in how your background (academic and otherwise) has led to your decision to study law. Please note, the personal statement is not the place to repeat items on your résumé.

The personal statement should be 2-3 pages, double-spaced, and at least 12 point font. The Admissions Committee values carefully crafted essays that are clear, concise, and compelling. The personal statement is a writing sample and you should pay particular attention to the details of your composition. The statement must be electronically attached.

You are required to submit a résumé to illustrate your chronological work history. Indicate hours per week for each activity where applicable. Please limit your résumé to no more than two pages, but one is preferred.

We require two letters of recommendation to complete your application. The most influential letters of recommendation focus on your academic potential. They are written by people who know you well and will evaluate your academic performance. Although recommendations not pertaining to academic abilities are helpful, academic recommendations carry the most weight with the Admissions Committee. If you have been out of college for a number of years, then a letter from an employer would be appropriate. As this is an academic environment, we encourage employers to discuss the candidate's written and oral communication skills, leadership skills, and potential for the study of law. We will accept a maximum of THREE letters of recommendation.

Contribution to Diversity

USC Gould's admissions process is guided by the view that a student body that reflects the broad and rich diversity of our society provides a superior educational environment for all law students. The primary goal of our admissions process is to enroll students who demonstrate outstanding academic and professional promise and whose background and experience will enrich USC Gould's educational environment or enhance the diversity of our student body and the legal profession.

You may be regarded as potentially contributing to student diversity if your background or experience would not ordinarily be well represented in the student body or the legal profession. Examples include (but are not limited to) students who:

  • Have struggled against prejudice, economic disadvantage, family or personal adversity, or other social hardships (perhaps as a result of disability, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, or religious affiliation).
  • Have lived in a foreign country or who spoke a language other than English at home.
  • Have unusual career goals, employment history (perhaps military or law enforcement experience), or educational background (including graduate study).
  • Demonstrate unusual extracurricular achievement (including school or community service).

If you believe your background or experience can contribute to USC Gould's goal of diversity and educational enrichment--and if you would like this factor considered in the admissions process--please include detailed written information about your background or experience in your application (providing such information is voluntary). There is an optional diversity statement in the Attachments section of the application and should be limited to 1-2 pages, double-spaced, and at least 12 point font.

The Admissions Committee does not grant interviews to candidates as part of the admissions process.

Admission Decisions and Timelines

Applications that are complete by February 1, 2021 receive priority review both for admission and scholarships. However, we will accept applications through April 1, 2021. All applications must be complete by April 15, 2021 or they will be administratively withdrawn. No exceptions to this policy will be granted.

All applicant files are reviewed administratively by the Dean of Admissions or a member of the admissions staff once before they are complete. A portion of the applicant pool is admitted and denied by the Dean of Admissions based on admissions criteria set forth by the Admissions and Financial Aid Committee. A small number of files are reviewed by the Admissions and Financial Aid Committee who make advisory admissions decisions. Candidates who are placed on a waiting list are encouraged to submit letters of continued interest periodically. In addition, they may update their file with new information, which they believe may support an offer of admission. Decision notifications typically begin mid-December and conclude around May 15, 2021. All decisions are final and no appeals process exists.

Requirements for Enrollment

If you are admitted to USC Gould, you are required to pay two non-refundable $500.00 tuition deposits by specified deadlines (typically May 1 and June 15). The enrollment instructions included with your admission packet will provide deadlines and instructions.

Prior to enrollment in August, you must submit your official transcript, verifying your receipt of a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university to the law school Admissions and Financial Aid Office.

Acceptance Deferral Policy

USC Gould grants deferrals for up to one year (except for applicants who are participating in Teach for America who may receive up to two years). Deferrals are granted on a case-by-case basis and generally only where circumstances not present at the time of application submission have since arisen. You are encouraged to seek a deferral as early as possible in the spring/summer. The odds of a deferral being granted are greatly diminished after July 1st. Candidates must agree to submit the required tuition seat deposit(s), withdraw all applications from other law schools (including waiting lists), and agree not to submit new applications during the next admission cycle.

Bar Admission Character Considerations

In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction directly. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners. USC Gould requires applicants for admission to fully disclose responses to the following questions:

  • Have you ever been dropped, suspended, warned, placed on academic or disciplinary probation, disciplined, expelled, or requested or advised to resign from any post-secondary school, college, university, professional school, or law school?
  • Have you ever been convicted of the violation of a misdemeanor or felony, or pleaded guilty or nolo contendere to a violation of a misdemeanor or felony, whether or not the charges were dismissed, the court entered a judgement of conviction, or the court imposed a sentence?
  • Are any charges pending against you?
  • Have you ever been or are you currently registered at another law school either foreign or domestic?

If the answer to any of the questions is in the affirmative, then a full written explanation must accompany the application. You will be prompted to include your statement within the application, or if you need additional space, you may include your statement via the Attachments section. Candor is extremely important and appreciated by the Admissions Committee. An affirmative answer is not necessarily disqualifying; however, lack of disclosure may cause substantial problems in seeking a moral character determination as part of the bar licensure process.

We recommend you familiarize yourself with the rules governing admission to the bar in the states where you intend to practice. You can obtain information about bar requirements by writing to the appropriate state board of bar examiners.

Ongoing Duty to Disclose

All candidates for admission have an ongoing duty to disclose material changes to their application especially as they relate to conduct matters (criminal or disciplinary) to the Dean of Admissions prior to enrollment. Candidates agree that providing inaccurate, misleading, or incomplete information on the admission application, omitting information, or any additional changed information provided can lead to the rescission of any offer of admission and/or scholarship, or for discipline, dismissal, or revocation of the degree if discovered at a later date. Additionally, such a violation during the admission process may lead to referral to LSAC for a finding of misconduct in the admission process.

USC Gould School of Law will be offering fee waivers to ALL applicants through February 1, 2021 . Please apply early to enjoy the benefit of an automatic application fee waiver. In the past, USC Gould has offered several types of application fee waivers. These included merit-based fee waivers, hardship/need-based fee waivers, Teach for America fee waivers, and waivers to USC undergraduates. Applicants who fall into any of these categories will receive the automatic fee waiver granted through February 1, 2021, however, if you apply following this priority deadline, fee waivers will NOT be granted.

Beginning February 2, 2021, the non-refundable application fee is $75.00. Refunds will not be granted for applicants who fail to follow the application instructions.

Our Nondiscrimination Policy

USC Gould is firmly committed to a policy against discrimination based upon ethnicity, national origin, disability, race, religion, political beliefs, gender, sexual orientation or gender identity, or age.

If you have questions about the admissions process, please call the Office of Admissions at 213.740.2523 or send an e-mail message to [email protected] .

18 Vanderbilt University Instructions

Instructions: vanderbilt law school.

Thank you for considering Vanderbilt Law School. We look forward to working with you during the application process.

Vanderbilt is recognized among the nation's leading law schools for its faculty of renowned scholars, its talented student body drawn from across the nation and around the world, its rigorous curriculum with an array of joint-degree, specialized, experiential, and interdisciplinary programs, and for its graduates throughout the US and abroad. Building on this tradition of excellence, Vanderbilt has established itself as a leader in designing innovative programs that connect outstanding theoretical training to real-world skills, information, and experience necessary for effective law practice in the twenty-first century. A legal education that combines the best scholarly research and policy analysis with effective lawyering skills provides an immediate advantage to Vanderbilt graduates upon entry to the profession.

With about 180 students in each entering class, Vanderbilt's size fosters a tradition of challenging intellectual inquiry in an atmosphere of respect for individuals and ideas. This small-school sense of collegiality combined with an accessible and distinguished faculty creates an exceptional environment for intellectual and professional training. With state-of-the-art facilities situated on a beautiful university campus in a sophisticated, friendly, and affordable city, Vanderbilt offers a first-rate legal education in a setting that promotes a great quality of life.

With more than 80 percent of each graduating class taking employment out of state, VLS graduates obtain top-tier employment outcomes while enjoying national geographic mobility, which is supported by the school’s global alumni network and longstanding relationships with legal employers coast to coast.

Prospective students who visit campus discover that Vanderbilt's hometown is a great place for law school. Nashville has emerged as a vibrant and progressive place with wide-ranging cultural, professional, and recreational options—all the advantages of a big city built on a human scale. The law school is ideally situated in this major center of legal and economic activity that provides an array of opportunities in law firms, state and federal courts, public agencies, nonprofits, and corporations. You are welcome to visit at any time for a firsthand look at this special place in American legal education. Please contact the Admissions Office at 615.322.6452 or [email protected] to make arrangements. You may also wish to explore our website at law.vanderbilt.edu .

Binding Early Decision Option

We designed our Binding Early Decision option specifically for prospective J.D. students who have thoroughly explored a range of law schools and have determined that Vanderbilt clearly stands out as the best personal fit for their legal education. If Vanderbilt Law School is your clear first choice, consider expediting the application process by applying under Binding Early Decision.

Binding Early Decision candidates must attach to their applications a signed Binding Early Decision Agreement through which they fully commit to attend Vanderbilt if admitted under Binding Early Decision. Early Decision candidates must complete their applications by November 1 and are notified during November and December that their applications have been accepted, waitlisted for further review, or denied. Candidates may not apply to a binding early decision program at another law school while applying under Binding Early Decision at Vanderbilt.

If accepted, Binding Early Decision applicants must promptly confirm their intent to enroll at Vanderbilt and withdraw all applications to other law schools. All candidates accepted under Binding Early Decision will receive an annual scholarship not less than $35,000 per academic year ($105,000 over 3 years). Offers of admission under Binding Early Decision are for fall entry in the current admission cycle only; we will not approve requests for deferred enrollment.

Some Early Decision applications may be held for further review and will subsequently receive an offer of admission during the regular admission cycle. In those cases, the Early Decision Agreement is no longer binding on the applicant.

To apply under Binding Early Decision, you must submit the Vanderbilt JD application and all required materials to LSAC no later than November 1:

  • Answer “Yes” to the question in the Early Decision section of the application
  • Attach your signed Early Decision Agreement to the “Attachments” section of the application. The Agreement is available for download on the Vanderbilt Law website.
  • Submit your Vanderbilt application to LSAC with all required materials by November 1
  • When we receive your application from LSAC, we will notify you by email and provide instructions for claiming your Vanderbilt Law application portal where you can view the status of your application and upload additional materials, including a Video Essay.

Complete information on our Binding Early Decision option is available on the Law School’s web site.

Application Information

Applications may be submitted from September 1 through April 1 and admission decisions are made on a rolling basis.

Documents required to complete a file include the application form, LSAC's Credential Assembly Service Law School Report, two letters of recommendation, personal statement, the JD Financial Aid Statement form (required for all applicants), and a $70 nonrefundable application fee. Candidates who apply electronically must pay online using a credit card and must certify their applications electronically. Your application will be considered complete when we have at least one LSAT score (as well as all the other required materials). If you plan on retaking the LSAT on a future date and do not want your application reviewed until that score is received, you must email [email protected] to request.

Decisions on individual applications are made as quickly as possible, although the time period from completion to decision can vary substantially from case to case. We are committed to providing a thorough evaluation to each application, and the admission process reflects our belief that the quality of the educational environment benefits from considering a range of information that is far broader than GPA and LSAT scores. The rolling selection process allows for extending the time frame of consideration so that each application receives the individual attention it deserves and so that we can make close comparisons of applications completed at different times.

Please note that applications for Law Scholars Merit Awards (full tuition) should be completed on your applicant portal by January 10, although we will consider applications submitted after that date if possible. Separate from these awards, all admitted candidates are considered for Vanderbilt Law School merit scholarships, which are awarded in various amounts. February 1 is the suggested priority filing date for the FAFSA form necessary for need-based scholarship consideration and educational loans. Applicants age 26 or younger should provide parental information on the FAFSA. Decisions concerning Law Scholar Merit Awards, Vanderbilt Law School Merit Scholarships, need-based awards, and loan packages are made on an ongoing basis. Recipients are notified as decisions are made.

International students who completed a bachelor's degree at an institution outside the United States and outside Canada should refer to the Application Checklist for more information on applying to the JD program at Vanderbilt.

Admission Interview with a VLS Alum

We’d like to know you better as a prospective student and for you to learn more about Vanderbilt. That’s why we offer admission interviews with VLS alumni as part of the application process, and why VLS alumni conduct interviews nationwide and in several foreign locations.

To request an alumni interview, you must submit your application by November 15 with the Admission Interviews request section completed appropriately. All interviews this cycle will be conducted virtually.

We ask that you not request an alumni interview if you have applied Early Decision to another law school.

Checklist for JD Applicants: Vanderbilt Law School

Important dates:.

• September 1 application opens.

• November 1 Early Decision deadline.

• November 15 deadline for submitting application with request for an alumni interview.

• January 10 deadline for Law Scholars Merit Awards (full-tuition scholarship). We will consider applications submitted after that date when possible.

• February 1 is the suggested filing date for the FAFSA form to receive priority consideration for need-based scholarship assistance.

• April 1 application closes.

The following items must be submitted to complete your electronic application:

\1. Application form—complete as instructed. Please attach a résumé.

\2. Credential Assembly Service Law School Report—you must register with LSAC for the Credential Assembly Service at LSAC.org . Your Credential Assembly Service Law School Report will include your LSAT score(s), LSAT writing sample, photocopies of your academic transcripts, and a transcript analysis. At your recommenders' option, letters of recommendation may also be included with your law school report (see below). Applying electronically, your Vanderbilt electronic application forms will be "bundled" with your law school report and sent to our office. International students who completed a bachelor's degree at an institution outside the United States (including its territories) and/or Canada must: (1) register with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service, and (2) if the language of instruction at the foreign institution conferring your bachelor's degree was not English, you must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and have ETS send your scores directly to LSAC.

\3. Two letters of recommendation—letters should be from people who have worked closely with you and who know you well. Letters from faculty members who have taught you tend to provide information most relevant to you as a prospective law student and most helpful to readers of your application. Faculty members who have served as your advisors, research supervisors, or have taught you in more than one course are often good choices. Letters from employers who know you well also provide helpful and relevant information for your law school application. We encourage you to submit your letters through LSAC's Credential Assembly Service, although your recommenders are welcome to send letters directly to our office, if they prefer.

\4. A nonrefundable $70 application fee. Filing electronically, you must pay online by credit card.

Attachments

\1. Personal Statement . This attachment is required.

Please present yourself to the Admissions Committee by writing a personal statement. You may write about your background, experiences, interest in law, aspirations, or any topic that you feel will help readers of your application get a sense of you as a person and prospective law student. Please limit your statement to two pages.

\2. Résumé . This attachment is strongly encouraged. In addition to your employment responses on the application form, we encourage you to submit a resume.

\3. Diversity. This attachment is optional and welcome.

In addition to listing diversity characteristics on the application form, we welcome diversity statements that describe any aspect of your background or experience that you would like to provide.

\4. Early Decision Agreement. This agreement is available for download on the Vanderbilt Law web site.

\5. Other. This attachment is optional and user-defined. You are welcome to use this attachment to provide any other information that you would like to make available to readers of your application.

20 Boston University Instructions

Dear applicant,

We are delighted that you have chosen to apply to Boston University School of Law, and we look forward to working with you over the coming weeks and months. Please read the following application instructions carefully, and do not hesitate to contact our office whenever you have questions or concerns.

Sincerely, Alissa Leonard Assistant Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid

Boston University School of Law Admissions Office 765 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, MA 02215 [email protected]

Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university, or be enrolled in a course of study that will result in the award of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university before commencing study at BU Law. Accepted students matriculate only in the fall semester on a full-time basis.

Application opens: September 1, 2020

Deadline to submit a regular decision application: April 1, 2021

Distinguished Scholars Binding Early Decision Program deadline:

  • Application received by November 11, 2020 and completed by November 13, 2020

“BU-Bound" Binding Decision Program deadline:

  • Application received by January 6, 2021 and completed by January 8, 2021

Public Interest Scholarship deadline :

  • Application received and complete, including documents transmitted from LSAC and the Public Interest Scholarship essay, by January 15, 2021

Boston University has a rolling admissions process. We review applications and make decisions beginning in late fall and continue throughout the spring. The time required to review and render a decision on each application varies.

Application Checklist – More detailed information on the application process can be found on our website .

Online Application . Applications must be submitted online via the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) .

Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) or Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) .

  • LSAT: We recommend that you take the LSAT no later than January 2021. Applicants who took the LSAT before June 1, 2015 must retake the exam. The Admissions Committee will view all test dates and scores, with the highest considered in admission review. If you have indicated a future test date your application will be held for review until we receive that score.
  • GRE: Please note, if you take the LSAT, while the holistic review of your file will include all information submitted, your highest LSAT score will be the standardized test used in review of your candidacy.You may take the GRE in lieu of or in addition to the LSAT. If you took the GRE before June 1, 2016 you must retake the exam. If you have indicated a future test date, your application will be held for review until we receive that score. You are required to submit all GRE results from the past five years. For more information and to register for the GRE, please go to ETS.org . Our institution code is 4180.

LSAC Credential Assembly Services (CAS) Report . All applicants must register with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service (CAS) during the current processing year. A transcript from each college or university attended must be sent directly to LSAC, not BU Law. LSAC will produce a complete CAS Law School Report. If you have a graduate degree or are pursuing a graduate degree you must submit your graduate transcripts through LSAC to complete your application.

Two Letters of Recommendation. Two letters of recommendation (submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service) are required. You may submit up to four letters of recommendation. You MUST use the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service for all of your recommendations.

Personal Statement. Your personal statement should discuss the significant personal, social, or academic experiences that have contributed to your decision to study law. Most personal statements are approximately two pages long. Please double-space your personal statement.

Résumé. You résumé should reflect all full-time and part-time employment, both paid and unpaid, and all extracurricular activities and honors. Please indicate on your résumé whether any employment was full or part-time, and paid or unpaid. Please format your résumé in reverse chronological order, with the most recent employment at the top. Please do not include high school activities or awards in your résumé. There is no required length for the résumé. Gaps of three months or more in the timeline of your résumé should be explained with an addendum.

$85 Application Fee. A non-refundable application fee is required of all applicants. You will pay by credit card when applying electronically. If you have received a fee waiver from LSAC, you also qualify for an application fee waiver from Boston University School of Law. To request a need-based fee waiver follow the directions found here . A fee waiver can only be granted prior to submitting your application.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (if applicable). To determine if a TOEFL score is required, please visit our website .

Optional Essay (if applicable). In addition to your personal statement, you may wish to provide an additional essay. This essay is your opportunity to discuss any aspect of your background or life experience that you believe will enhance your ability to contribute to the diverse BU classroom experience and community. BU Law values and recognizes the importance of diversity. An ethnically, socio-economically and otherwise diverse class is essential to the education of each student. As a producer of leaders in legal practice, government or other public service, academia and business, BU Law continues its long-standing tradition of providing opportunities for persons of all backgrounds and providing the excellent training to which a diverse classroom is indispensable.

Addenda or Supplemental Statements (if applicable). This includes information on Character and Fitness, statements regarding previous law school attendance, statements explaining gaps in employment, or any other information you think would be useful to the Admissions Committee.

Binding Decision Contract (if applicable). If you are applying to one of our two binding decision programs please submit the signed contract along with your completed application.

Public Interest Scholarship Essay (if applicable). If you wish to be considered for the Public Interest Scholarship you must attach an essay (two page maximum) to your application for admission describing your public interest career goals and how your past experience has informed your commitment to a public interest career.

Reapplying to BU Law

If you have previously applied to Boston University School of Law, you must complete a new application online via LSAC. You must pay the $85 application fee and submit a new personal statement, CAS Law School Report, and résumé . The Admissions Office keeps the previous three years of applications on file and will supplement your current file with archived documents if reapplication occurs within this timeframe.

Financing Your Studies

21 University of Minnesota Instructions

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA LAW SCHOOL

J.D. REGULAR and EARLY DECISION APPLICATION PROCESS

Eligible candidates for admission to the J.D. program must have completed their bachelor's degree, or be in the final year of a bachelor's degree program. The bachelor's degree must be awarded by an accredited U.S. college or university or be an equivalent degree from a recognized non-U.S. institution.

Admission and scholarship decisions are made on a rolling basis, so applying earlier in the cycle is to an applicant’s advantage. The Admissions Committee begins reviewing applications in late November, and it usually takes 4-8 weeks for decisions to be made. In order to enroll a highly qualified, diverse class each year, the Admissions Committee conducts a holistic review of each applicant’s materials and considers factors such as student engagement and activities, professional experience, writing ability, college attended and major, graduate-level studies, community service, and references.

In addition to a bar examination, character and fitness is a determining qualification for bar admission. Applicants should review the requirements for any jurisdiction where they intend to seek admission; bar admission agency addresses for each state are available through the National Conference for Bar Examiners. Applicants should also carefully review the Law School’s Character & Fitness Disclosure Policy, which requires them to fully disclose criminal or academic misconduct matters, whether they occurred before or after submission of the application.

J.D. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

  • Application: All applicants are required to submit their application electronically through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC).
  • Application Fee: $60 . Applicants must pay the non-refundable application fee online through LSAC using a credit card.
  • LSAT: Information concerning the LSAT may be obtained from LSAC. A valid score must be no more than five years old at the time of application. The Admissions Committee considers the highest score.
  • Credential Assembly Service: All applicants, including international applicants, must register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS), and send all undergraduate and graduate transcripts there.
  • One Letter of Recommendation: One letter is required and must be submitted through the CAS. We will accept no more than two letters of recommendation. The recommendation should be written by a professor or employer who is able to address your academic or professional performance.
  • Personal Statement: All applicants are required to submit a personal statement (two pages, double-spaced), which articulates significant achievements, professional goals, and reasons for pursuing a law degree. It is also helpful to the Admissions Committee to discuss specific interest in the University of Minnesota Law School.
  • Supplemental Statements: Applicants may also submit one or more supplemental statements (one page, double-spaced) to highlight diversity perspectives, explain absences or breaks in education, or present other matters that may be of importance to the Admissions Committee. A separate Supplemental Statement should be submitted for Character & Fitness disclosures of criminal or academic misconduct matters.

Application Deadlines December 31: Early Decision June 1: Regular Decision

Candidates who have determined that the University of Minnesota Law School is their first choice may submit an application to the Early Decision Program. This program is binding; therefore, applicants admitted through the program commit themselves to matriculating at Minnesota Law, must withdraw all applications at other law schools, and may not initiate new applications after being admitted to the Law School. Early Decision applicants receive the same scholarship consideration as Regular Decision candidates, and if not admitted through Early Decision may be considered for Regular Decision, at the discretion of the Admissions Committee.

Review of Early Decision applications will commence on December 1. Applicants will receive a decision within two weeks of the application being complete after that date. The final deadline is December 31 for Admissions to receive a complete application, and all decisions will be made on or before January 15.

Candidates receiving their undergraduate degree from institutions outside the United States must submit their transcripts to the CAS for evaluation. A valid TOEFL or IELTS score (no more than five years old) must also be submitted to the CAS; however, this requirement is waived if an undergraduate or graduate degree has been earned in the United States.

The University of Minnesota shall provide equal access to and opportunity in its programs, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

As required by Title IX, the University does not discriminate on the basis of sex in any of its education programs or activities, including in admissions and employment. Inquiries about the application of Title IX can be directed to the University’s Title IX Coordinators or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. Please see the University of Minnesota’s Title IX Statement ( eoaa.umn.edu/resources ) and the University’s policy ( policy.umn.edu/hr/sexharassassault ) for information about: (1) how to contact the Title IX Coordinators on the University’s campuses; (2) how to report or file a formal complaint of sexual harassment, gender-based harassment, sexual assault, stalking or relationship violence; and (3) the University’s procedures for responding to reports and formal complaints.

22 University of Notre Dame Instructions

Introduction.

Notre Dame Law School (NDLS) admits new Juris Doctor students for the fall term only and begins accepting applications on September 1 for the next year's entering class. Given the competitive nature of the applicant pool and NDLS's rolling processes for both admissions and scholarship, the Admissions Committee recommends that prospective students read the following directions closely and consider applying early in the admission cycle.

The Admissions Committee seeks to enroll a highly qualified and diverse class that will help the Law School achieve its mission of educating lawyers who will serve the good of the human family.

To that end, the Admissions Committee evaluates candidates in a holistic manner and considers an array of factors including, but not limited to, the following: academic achievement and potential; undergraduate and graduate coursework; demonstrated leadership skills; community involvement; overcoming adversity; work and life experiences; and a specific interest in the study and practice of law. When completing the application, students are encouraged to consider how they may address the factors listed above. While it is not necessary to address each item in the application, many of our most competitive applicants highlight the factors they believe are the strongest, address a specific interest in the study and practice of law, and indicate how NDLS will assist them in achieving their personal and professional goals.

Application Dates

The Regular Decision application opens September 1; the application deadline is March 15. All supporting documents (i.e., letters of recommendation, standardized test scores, etc.) must be on file by March 25.

The Early Decision application opens September 1; the application deadline is February 15. All supporting documents must be on file by March 1.

Because NDLS uses a rolling process for both admissions and scholarship, applicants are encouraged to apply as early as possible beginning September 1.

If applying via Early Decision, students must submit a complete application by November 15 in order to receive a decision by late-December.

Early Decision vs. Regular Decision

Students interested in attending Notre Dame Law School may apply via either Early or Regular Decision.

Early Decision is a binding process designed for applicants who have researched their law school options and have determined that NDLS is their top choice. Applying to NDLS via Early Decision allows students to express their high level of interest in attending Notre Dame Law School. The Admissions Committee gives priority review to Early Decision applications. Students admitted via Early Decision will receive information regarding their scholarship offer (if any) at the time of admission; students admitted via Regular Decision will learn of their scholarship status beginning in mid-February.

As part of the Early Decision application process, students must agree to the following:

  • The student will not have an active binding early-decision application to another law school. The student may have active applications to other law schools via a non-binding early admissions process or via regular action/decision admissions processes.
  • If admitted to NDLS via binding Early Decision, the student will provide their confirmation deposit by the deadline noted on their decision letter (typically within 10 business days).
  • If admitted to NDLS via binding Early Decision, the student will immediately withdraw all pending applications to other law schools.
  • If admitted to NDLS via binding Early Decision, the student will not submit further applications to other law schools for the remainder of the 2020-2021 application cycle.

Please note that this current form is the Regular Decision application. Students wishing to apply via Early Decision must submit the Early Decision application .

The fee for applying to Notre Dame Law School via the LSAC Application is $75 US and may be paid by credit card, check, or money order. This fee is non refundable.

If paying by check or money order, please make these documents payable to "Notre Dame Law School." Applicants must also submit the Certification Letter with their check or money order.

A fee waiver is available for some applicants including those for whom this fee presents a burden as well as those who have one or more years of full-time service in the U.S. military, Alliance for Catholic Education, AmeriCorps, Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Peace Corps, or Teach for America. Further information regarding the fee waiver may be found here .

Repeat Applicants

Students who applied in previous admissions cycles are encouraged to update their materials accordingly. At minimum, the Admissions Committee requests updates to the application form, personal statement, resume, and that applicants provide their most recent academic documents. Academic letters of recommendation may be re-used from previous applications but the Admissions Committee suggests that applicants provide a further letter from an additional recommender who can provide insight on the applicant's work since the time of the original application. Students must also disclose any updated information related to the Character and Fitness section.

A complete Regular Decision application is composed of the following required documents:

  • This application form
  • Personal statement
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • LSAT and/or GRE
  • LSAC CAS law school report
  • Character and Fitness information
  • TOEFL (see below for applicability)

The following are optional or may be requested of a candidate by the Admissions Committee:

"Why Notre Dame Law School?" Statement

"different kind of lawyer" statement, required documents.

Students should answer all questions on the application form. If a question does not apply to a student - or if the student would prefer not to answer an optional question - the student may indicate as such.

The Admissions Committee gives considerable emphasis in its evaluation to the personal statement. The statement should provide the Admissions Committee with insights about the applicant and the applicant's interest in pursuing a legal education. The most effective personal statements also typically provide further insight into the writer's personality, background, professional interests, or matters that are not fully present in other parts of the application.

The personal statement must be the applicant's original work in their own words. It should be no more than two double-spaced pages. The personal statement must be included with the application at the time of submission. The personal statement's header must include the student's name, LSAC account number, and be titled "NDLS Personal Statement."

For further information regarding formatting preferences of the Admissions Committee, please consult the Frequently Asked Questions page here .

An applicant's resume should highlight their educational, professional, leadership, and service experiences. The applicant may also wish to highlight honors, awards, or special skills. There is no page limit for the resume but one to two pages is typical.

For further information regarding the resume preferences of the Admissions Committee, please consult the Frequently Asked Questions page here .

  • Two Letters of Recommendation

The Admissions Committee requires applicants to submit two letters of recommendation. Applicants may submit up to four letters if desired.

The letters of recommendation should come from individuals who can evaluate the applicant's candidacy both in terms of academic skills as well as personal qualities. At least one recommendation - preferably both - should come from an individual who instructed the applicant in either an undergraduate or graduate course. The Admissions Committee recognizes that some applicants - especially those who received their bachelor's degree a number of years ago - may have difficulty meeting this request. In such cases, letters from employers/supervisors or others who have worked closely with the applicant are acceptable substitutes.

Applicants are required to use the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service that is part of the Credential Assembly Service. LSAC will include these letters with the CAS report. Please note that LSAC will not release the CAS report until all initial recommenders have submitted their letters. LSAC will send further CAS reports if additional recommenders submit letters at a later time.

For further information regarding the letters of recommendation preferences of the Admissions Committee, please consult the Frequently Asked Questions page here .

Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and/or Graduate Record Examination (GRE)

Applicants must take either the LSAT or the GRE.

Applicants must report all valid LSAT and GRE results for the period between June 2015 (for the LSAT) and July 2015 (for the GRE) and the present. Applicants may not withhold reporting any valid LSAT or GRE scores.

LSAC will provide all LSAT score reports via the CAS report.

Applicants who have taken the GRE must send their score reports to NDLS via ETS. The DI Code for NDLS is 4295 .

The Office of Admissions recommends that applicants take the LSAT or the GRE within a year of applying to the Law School. - The Admissions Committee should receive the results of the January 2021 LSAT or a GRE taken by January 15, 2021 with sufficient time so as to be considered as part of an Early Decision application. - The Admissions Committee should receive the results of the February 2020 LSAT or a GRE taken by February 28, 2021 with sufficient time so as to be considered as part of a Regular Decision application. - The Admissions Committee may consider the results of the April 2021 LSAT or a GRE taken on or after March 1, 2021 for applicants who are offered a place on the waitlist.

LSAC and ETS consider their exams to be valid for five admissions cycles after the exam. The oldest exams that may be considered in the 2020-2021 admissions cycle are the June 2015 LSAT and a GRE taken on or after July 1, 2015.

LSAC will inform the Office of Admissions if an applicant has registered for a future LSAT. The Admissions Committee will withhold evaluating the applicant's file until it receives the results of that future LSAT. Applicants planning to take the GRE after submitting their application must provide that information on the Standardized Testing section of this application form.

For further information regarding how the Admissions Committee considers standardized test scores, please consult the Frequently Asked Questions page here .

The Admissions Committee considers not only the applicant's overall grades but also their coursework, major(s), minor(s), and concentrations. Please note that LSAC will standardize an applicant's undergraduate GPA per their regulations. The LSAC-calculated GPA will include all coursework completed towards the applicant's initial bachelor's degree. While neither coursework for subsequent bachelor's degrees nor for advanced degrees is factored into the LSAC-calculated GPA, the Admissions Committee will consider this further academic work in its evaluation.

Please submit all post-secondary transcripts to LSAC so as to be included in the CAS report.

The Admissions Committee strongly encourages students who are applying during the course of their senior year of college to provide updated transcripts to LSAC at the completion of each subsequent academic semester or quarter. LSAC will send further CAS reports upon receipt of such transcripts.

Students may address any concerns regarding their coursework or grades in the Addenda section of the application.

Of special note, the Admissions Committee recognizes that many institutions implemented versions of pass/fail or credi/no credit grading systems for the Spring 2020 semester. The Admissions Committee encourages applicants to provide further information regarding the grading practices at their institution for that semester via the Addenda section of the application.

LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Law School Report

Notre Dame Law School requires applicants to register with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service. Notre Dame's number for use of the service is 1841 . An applicant's CAS report will include their LSAT scores, LSAT writing sections, all post-secondary transcripts, and letters of recommendation.

Please note that LSAC charges a one-time registration fee of $195 for this service and, additionally, $45 per law school to which the student applies. Applicants may find more information regarding the CAS report on LSAC's website .

Please do not send LSAT score reports, transcripts, or letters of recommendation directly to Notre Dame Law School unless specifically requested by the NDLS Office of Admissions.

Character and Fitness Information

If a student answers "Yes" to either of the Character and Fitness questions on this application, the student must provide a full explanation of the circumstances involved and the resolution to the situation(s) in question. Students should double-space this explanation and label the attachment with their name, LSAC account number, and use the title "Character and Fitness" in the statement's header.

Students have a continued requirement to report any updates to their Character and Fitness information throughout the application process as well as post-enrollment at Notre Dame Law School: - If a student applies to NDLS and - prior to admission or enrollment at NDLS - later engages in an action that would have led the student to answer "Yes" to either of the Character and Fitness questions, the student must immediately update the Office of Admissions regarding the incident. Please send updates to [email protected] , subject line "Character and Fitness Update." - If a student applies to NDLS and - after admission and enrollment at NDLS - later engages in an action that would have led the student to answer "Yes" to either of the Character and Fitness questions, the student must immediately update Jenny Fox, the Law School Registrar, regarding the incident. Please send updates to [email protected] , subject line "Character and Fitness Update."

Applicants from non-English-speaking countries must take the TOEFL offered by ETS. Applicants who have received a post-secondary degree (B.A., M.A., MBA, Ph.D., etc.) from a college or university in the United States are exempt from this requirement. If an applicant has an extraordinary ability for the English language (e.g., has worked as a translator, taught English, received a post-secondary degree from a college or university in an English-speaking country, etc.), they may request a waiver from this requirement. Applicants should submit this request to the Office of Admissions at [email protected] , subject line "TOEFL waiver request."

The Admissions Committee prefers that applicants sit for the TOEFL within one year of the time that they apply to the Law School. ETS will report scores up to two years after a test date.

Applicants must have copies of the official TOEFL report forwarded to LSAC directly from ETS. Please do not send official score reports to Notre Dame Law School unless specifically requested by the NDLS Office of Admissions.

Optional Documents

Applicants may use this optional statement as an opportunity to express a specific interest in Notre Dame Law School. Applicants may wish to address how their background, experiences, personal character, and/or career aspirations align with the legal education that NDLS provides and how the Law School can assist them with both their professional and personal formation.

The "Why Notre Dame Law School?" statement must be the applicant's own work in their own words. It should be no more than two double-spaced pages. If an applicant plans on providing this statement, it must be included with their application at the time of submission. The statement's header must include the applicant's name, LSAC account number, and be titled "Why NDLS Statement."

The mission of Notre Dame Law School is to educate a "Different Kind of Lawyer" - one who see the law as more than just a profession, but as a service to others. Students are encouraged to explore not only the moral and ethical dimensions of the law but also their unique roles in furthering the cause of justice.

This mission was most recently exemplified in Dean G. Marcus Cole's open letter to the Notre Dame Law Community in June 2020. Dean Cole concludes his letter by asking what each of us can do to improve our commitment to justice and offered the following:

One thing that each and every one of us can do is to end the cycle of hate by ending the separation that leads to it.... Each of us needs to get to know people who differ from us. We must all make a conscious decision and effort to expand our circles.

Given the mission of Notre Dame Law School, Dean Cole's open letter, and his call to action, please provide a response to one or both of the following:

  • What is the unique voice you will lend to the class? How will you expand your classmates' circles and improve their education because of your presence in the class?
  • What do you hope to achieve either in law school or through your professional work that will further the cause of justice?

The "Different Kind of Lawyer" statement must be the applicant's own work in their own words. It should be no more than two double-spaced pages. If an applicant plans on providing this statement, it must be included with their application at the time of submission. The statement's header must include the applicant's name, LSAC account number, and be titled "DKL Statement."

If the applicant believes the Admissions Committee would benefit from additional information about their candidacy that is not specifically and/or fully expressed elsewhere in the application, the applicant is welcome to provide further notes via the Addenda. Examples of information typically provided in this section of the application include academic or LSAT/GRE explanations, further information regarding specific items on an applicant's resume or about the applicant's background, explanations of grading policies from the Spring 2020 semester, and eligibility for various veterans educational benefits such as the Yellow Ribbon program.

Applicants should double-space the Addenda. The Addenda' s header must include the applicant's name, LSAC account number, and be titled "Addenda."

The Admissions Committee may request an interview with selected candidates either prior to or after submission of an application. Interviews may be conducted via telephone or Zoom. Applicants who are invited to interview will be contacted by the Admissions Committee with instructions.

Due to the volume of applications, the Admissions Committee cannot consider requests by applicants for interviews.

Further Information

Scholarship Consideration

Notre Dame Law School is committed to providing a legal education of the highest quality at a tuition structure that compares favorably to other nationally regarded private law schools. Through the generosity of alumni and friends of the Law School, financial assistance in the form of scholarship may be available to members of each entering class.

Every applicant admitted to the Law School is automatically considered for general merit-based scholarship. The Law School does not require a separate application for scholarship consideration. Funds are awarded at the time of admission for candidates admitted via Early Decision and on a rolling basis beginning in mid-February for candidates admitted via Regular Decision. The Admissions and Scholarship committees encourage students to apply early in the admissions cycle so as to maximize their potential for a scholarship offer.

Students are encouraged to research and apply for outside scholarships that may provide further assistance. The Law School maintains a database of external scholarships .

Loan Assistance

In order to qualify for Federal loan programs, applicants must first file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Notre Dame's School Code is 001840 . The University's Office of Financial Aid requests that applicants submit their FAFSA by February 28.

Applicants can find more information regarding Federal loans at the Office of Financial Aid's website .

Yellow Ribbon Program and Veterans Educational Benefits.

Notre Dame Law School is a proud participant in the Post 9/11 GI Bill Yellow Ribbon Program. Veterans must be 100% Post 9/11-eligible in order to qualify. The Law School will contribute funds that - when combined with matching dollars from the Veterans Administration and support from the Post 9/11 GI Bill - will equal the cost of tuition and mandatory fees.

The Admissions and Scholarship committees encourage relevant applicants to identify their eligibility and status for military and/or veterans educational benefits in both the Military Service and Addenda sections of the application. The Office of Admissions may reach out to candidates for further information as needed.

Applicants may find more information on required documents and procedures regarding military and/or veterans educational benefits on the University Registrar's website dedicated to Veterans Affairs .

Applicants may find more information regarding the University's support of active duty military, veterans, and military dependants on the Office of Military and Veterans Affairs website .

Notice of Non-Discrimination

In compliance with federal law and the University of Notre Dame's non-discrimination policy , Notre Dame Law School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, disability, veteran status, genetic information, or age in the administration of any of its educational programs, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic and other school-administered programs, or in employment.

Notre Dame is committed to building an inclusive community and welcomes all individuals. The Notre Dame Spirit of Inclusion can be reviewed at diversity.nd.edu and diversity.nd.edu/together-at-notre-dame .

The University has designated the Director of its Office of Institutional Equity to handle all inquiries regarding its Notice of Non-Discrimination. Interested parties may contact the Director at equity.nd.edu , by calling 574-631-0444, or by writing to:

Director Office of Institutional Equity 100 Grace Hall, University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, IN 46556

As a member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), Notre Dame Law School complies with the provision of AALS Bylaw 6-3 that requires member schools to provide equality of opportunity in legal education for all persons. Notre Dame Law School is committed to building an inclusive community and welcomes all people regardless of gender (including identity and expression), religion, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, social or economic class, nationality, disability, or age.

The Law School welcomes people of all faiths and religions. At the same time, consistent with American Bar Association Standard 205 , the Law School reserves its right under the law to make hiring, admission, and other decisions in accord with its Catholic identity and its mission as a Catholic institution. In addition, the Law School reserves all other legal rights as a religious institution.

23 George Washington University Instructions

J.D. REGULAR DECISION APPLICATION PROCESS

In order to be considered for admission to the J.D. program, applicants must have completed their bachelor's degree, or be in the final year of a bachelor's degree program. The bachelor's degree must be awarded by an accredited U.S. college or university, or be an equivalent degree from a recognized non-U.S. institution. Applicants must have taken the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) within the past five years.

Admissions decisions are made on a rolling basis; therefore, applicants are urged to submit all required documents prior to the March 1 deadline as spaces fill quickly. The Admissions Committee will begin reviewing completed files in late October, and it typically takes eight weeks for decisions to be made. Factors considered in the admissions decision process include: the student's writing ability as demonstrated in the personal statement, undergraduate school attended and major, any graduate work completed, work and professional experience, extracurricular activities, and references. No minimum grade-point average or LSAT/GRE score is required. Consistent with the goal of providing an educationally stimulating and diverse environment, GW Law actively seeks to recruit qualified members of all backgrounds.

  • Application: All applicants are required to submit their application electronically through the Law School Admission Council ( LSAC ).
  • Application Fee: Waived for the fall 2021 admissions cycle.
  • Credential Assembly Service: All applicants, including international applicants, must register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Applicants must send all undergraduate and graduate transcripts to CAS, which will provide comprehensive reports that will include an applicant's academic work, LSAT score(s), and LSAT writing sample(s).
  • LSAT: Information concerning the LSAT, including test dates, may be obtained from LSAC. The test is administered at various centers in the United States and abroad. Completed LSAT application forms must be received by LSAC at least one month prior to the date of the exam. Applicants must take the LSAT no later than February 2021 .
  • GRE Pilot Program: Applicants who wish to sit for the GRE rather than the LSAT are permitted to do so through the GRE Pilot Program. The GRE will be assessed only when an applicant has not taken and does not plan to take the LSAT. In cases where an applicant has taken both the LSAT and the GRE, only the LSAT will be considered for admission. Applicants who apply with a GRE score and subsequently register for the LSAT must notify the Admissions Office immediately. Failure to do so will nullify the admission decision. Information about the GRE may be obtained from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) at https://www.ets.org/gre.
  • One Letter of Recommendation (applicants may submit up to three)
  • Written Statement(s): All applicants are required to submit a free topic personal statement (two pages, double-spaced). Applicants may also submit an optional statement (of 300 words or less) discussing characteristics and accomplishments they believe will contribute positively to the GW Law community and to the legal profession. If you wish to include an explanatory addendum with your application, you may attach it along with your personal or optional statement; it must be clearly titled as an addendum.

The Regular Decision Application deadline is March 1, 2021.

24 Arizona State University Instructions

APPLICATION PROCESS ASU is committed to a more sustainable and resilient future and requires applicants to apply electronically through the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) website at LSAC.org. The LSAC Help Desk is available at 215.965.1393 if you have questions or difficulties with the application. **

**Admission and scholarship decisions are made on a rolling basis, therefore for best consideration applicants should make every effort to apply when the ASU Law application is available beginning August 10, 2020. The admissions committee aims to return decisions within 15 business days from the date the application is marked complete. However, the admissions decision timeframe may increase around the priority application deadline of March 1st as well as after the deadline.

Applicants are responsible for ensuring that all required documents are received by our office. Applicants will typically receive a confirmation email and instructions on accessing the application status checker within 3 business days of submitting the electronic application.

Applicants should pay close attention to page length and formatting requirements for application materials. Applicants are also encouraged to closely review the required transcript policy for the LSAC CAS report.

Be aware that during the application review process the admissions committee may request additional information to be provided. Please check your email regularly and ensure that your voicemail box is set up and can receive messages should the admissions office need to contact you to request information.

Applications must be electronically submitted to ASU Law through LSAC:

March 1, 2021 for Binding Admission - O'Connor Honors Program (Full Tuition) Binding Admission - O'Connor Merit Scholars Program Binding Admission - Indian Law Leadership Program Regular Admission Program ASU Achievement Program (for a description of each admission program please visit: https://law.asu.edu/admission/apply/jd)

***** Applications received after the March 1, 2021 priority deadline will be accepted but considered late.* * Electronic applications are accepted until August 1, 2021 for the programs listed above.***

All applicants must register with LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service (CAS). An application for any of the admission programs listed above must include:

  • electronic application (application fee waived for all 2021 applicants);
  • your personal statement (no more than two pages, double-spaced and font size no smaller than 11 point);
  • your resume (no more than two pages and font size no smaller than 11 point);
  • character & fitness statement(s), if applicable, explaining affirmative answers to questions 1-8 in the Character & Fitness section;
  • binding admission contract, if applicable;
  • a valid LSAT score* (excludes applicants applying to the ASU Achievement program)
  • transcript(s) from each undergraduate and graduate institution you attended must be sent to LSAC.

Your application may also include:

  • Letters of Recommendation: You may submit no more than two letters, and they should be submitted through LSAC to be included in your CAS report. Please note that since they are not required, the admissions office will not wait for letters to complete your file for review.
  • Optional Addenda as described under the Attachments tab of this electronic application.

*** LSAT:** An LSAT score is valid for 5 years. Your LSAT score is considered valid if earned on or after June 2015. LSAC will report all LSAT scores for the past five years.

If your phone number, address, or email address changes at any time during the application cycle, please notify us by email ( [email protected] ) of your new contact information. You are welcome to contact us at this email address if you have any questions during the admissions process.

DECISION NOTIFICATION Decisions are communicated via email and you are encouraged to monitor your junk folder. The application status checker will also reflect when a decision has been made but may not reflect what decision has been reached.

DECISION RECONSIDERATION Admission decisions are final. An applicant who wishes to have their decision reconsidered must submit a formal request in writing to [email protected] explaining the reasons for their request. Requests for reconsideration are granted only in rare and exceptional circumstances, such as when the applicant is able to provide significant, new information that was not available at the time of our decision.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR ADMISSION TO THE BAR In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

CONTACT INFORMATION [email protected] P: (480) 965-1474 F: (480) 727-7930 Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law Office of Admissions and Financial Aid 111 E. Taylor St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 www.law.asu.edu

24 Emory University Instructions

Fall 2021 entering class.

All applications must be received by LSAC no later than March 1, 2021 by 11:59pm eastern time. Questions about the application may be addressed to [email protected] .

FIRST-TIME LAW APPLICANT

Emory Law's JD Admission application consists of six parts.

1. Application for Admission ("E-App")

An application is complete only if all questions are answered.

2. Two Letters of Recommendation

Please submit two letters through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. This service is included in your Credential Assembly Service (CAS) registration. Your letters will be copied and sent to us along with your CAS report as soon as your file becomes complete. Please do not submit more than two letters of recommendation. We strongly advise that an academic professor prepare one of these letters.

3. Credential Assembly (CAS) Report

A complete CAS report consists of the following:

  • LSAT score The LSAT must have been taken within the past five years. Emory Law considers the highest score only. There is no need to send an addendum regarding multiple scores.
  • Official transcripts from all post-high school institutions A transcript from each college and university attended should be sent directly to: Law School Admission Council, Box 2000-M, Newtown, PA 18940-0993. Please do not send this information to Emory Law. The Credential Assembly Service will analyze your transcripts and then send an electronic copy to Emory Law.

Once we receive your "E-App" to Emory Law, we will request your CAS report from LSAC.

4. Personal Statement

You may choose to write about any topic(s) you believe would be most helpful to the Admission Committee. The Personal Statement should not exceed two pages (typed, double-spaced). Applicants will disadvantage themselves by disregarding this limit.

Lawyers are professional writers. In our experience, virtually all employers are looking for graduates with superior legal writing skills. Emory devotes substantial resources to teaching legal writing, and all students receive significant individualized attention. Students who come to law school with solid writing skills are in the best position to take advantage of this training. Accordingly, in making admission decisions, Emory looks carefully at writing ability as evidenced by the personal statement.

5. Résumé or Statement of Activities

6. application fee.

Please submit the $85 nonrefundable application fee through LSAC. We award need-based fee waivers only if LSAC grants the applicant a fee waiver to take the LSAT. If so, please email [email protected] a copy of the LSAC fee waiver, and an admission representative will respond.

REAPPLICANT

To reapply, submit a new application through the LSAC electronic application service. On your application, indicate you are reapplying. We cannot reactivate previous applications. It will be necessary for you to submit all documents required of new applicants.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANT

In addition to the standard application, we require the following:

1. TOEFL Exam (for non-native English speakers) If your native language is not English, or if you did not obtain a degree from an accredited U.S. university, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required to demonstrate a satisfactory level of English language proficiency. For further information and appropriate application forms, contact TOEFL, 1-609-771-7100 or 1-877-863-3546 or www.toefl.org.

2. International Credential Evaluation (for those educated outside of the U.S.)

International transcripts must be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service. If you completed any postsecondary work outside of the United States (including its territories) or Canada, you must use this service for the evaluation of your international transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is if you completed the international work through a study-abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a US or Canadian institution, and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. This service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration fee. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your LSAC Law School Report. If you need to submit a TOEFL score, you must contact the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be sent to LSAC. LSAC's TOEFL code for the Credential Assembly Service is 0058. Your score will be included in the International Credential Documents that will be included in your LSAC Law School Report. Questions about the Credential Assembly Service can be directed to LSAC at 215.968.1001 or [email protected] .

GUIDANCE ON BAR CHARACTER AND FITNESS REQUIREMENTS

The Character and Fitness questions on Emory Law’s application sometimes provide a bit of anxiety for applicants. This guide is intended to ensure your answers are complete and accurate, which will greatly assist you when you apply to be a licensed lawyer in your chosen state after graduation from law school.

When you apply for Bar licensure to practice law, you will undergo a rigorous character evaluation from the Bar Admission’s Character and Fitness Committee in the state(s) in which you wish to practice. As part of the Bar application, many states ask you to submit a copy of your law school application. The committee will compare your answers to its questions with those provided in your school application.

If your answers are inconsistent, the Bar Committee will initiate a more intensive review of your file. For example, it may contact your law school to question whether you would have been admitted in light of this new information. You may suffer sanctions and revocation of law school admission for failing to disclose. The Bar Committee may schedule an in-person hearing to ask you why you failed to disclose information earlier. In some instances, the committee may delay your certification of fitness, which in turn may prevent you from becoming a lawyer as soon as you may like.

Each state’s character and fitness questions are unique to that jurisdiction. Emory Law’s questions capture as much information as possible to assist you when you apply to be a licensed lawyer in your chosen state(s) and when you undergo the evaluation by the state’s Bar Admission Character and Fitness Committee.

Below is specific guidance on the character and fitness questions found on Emory Law’s application for admission. Three principles govern you while completing this part of the application:

  • When in doubt, disclose.
  • You have a continuing obligation to ensure that these responses are correct (and amend, if and when necessary), until graduation from Emory Law.
  • If you have any questions, please email us at [email protected].

We understand that our character and fitness questions may be more rigorous than other schools to which you apply. As with all aspects of the Emory Law experience, your integrity, honesty, and character in answering these questions completely is fundamental to the community we strive to maintain.

1. Guidance on Academic Misconduct Question:

Have you ever been subject to any academic disciplinary action while in college or any educational setting since high school, regardless of the outcome of the action? This includes academic probation, warning, reprimand, suspension, expulsion, dismissal, or any type of academic discipline.

This question concerns any sort of academic misconduct or allegations of misconduct with which you may have been involved. Regardless of the resolution, you must disclose. Examples of academic misconduct include—but are not limited to—accusations of using Internet research inappropriately in a class assignment, allegations of inappropriate collaborations on a take-home exam, accusations of misbehavior during an assignment or exam, academic probation, academic suspension, expulsion, or any other academic irregularities.

You must disclose these allegations regardless of what an adjudicator, dean of students, professor or anyone else told you. We understand that at some schools allegations and sanctions may be removed from your file after a certain time. However, you still must disclose that they did occur. If you were found responsible/guilty, describe any sanctions levied against you (failing grade, grade reduction, community service, expulsion, etc.)

Sample Scenario: During his freshman year, Alex attended orientation at State University. During the program, he had to write an essay about the school's history. He and a friend worked together on their papers and shared research. The orientation coordinator discovered similarities in the papers and initiated academic proceedings against them. The dean of students met with Alex, verbally reprimanded him and sent Alex on his way. The dean said he would not make a notation on Alex’s file and that this event would be between them unless Alex repeated the offense. Alex graduated four years later with a 3.9 GPA with no further issues.

Alex should report this incident to Emory Law.

2. Guidance on Social Misconduct Question:

Have you ever been accused of, reprimanded for, detained for, or charged with any criminal offense or school conduct violation, regardless of the outcome? This includes any criminal accusations, including traffic offenses, except for parking violations. This also includes any reprimands or social actions while in college or any educational setting since high school (such as noise violations). If yes, submit an addendum titled Social Conduct to explain the situation, including the background and circumstances as well as the outcome and resolution. Disclose even if any charges were dismissed, or if you were acquitted or allowed to plead nolo contendere, or if the conviction was reversed, set aside or vacated, or if the record was sealed or expunged.

This question should be viewed in two parts.

First, have you ever been accused of or sanctioned for any criminal conduct, regardless of when it occurred? This includes allegations of juvenile criminal conduct. It does not matter if the situation was sent to a diversion program or any other alternative resolution forum, was dismissed before court, was removed from your record after community service was performed, was expunged or otherwise removed from your record. You must disclose the allegations. In addition, if you were punished, you must also explain the sanctions, including whether they were probation, incarceration, community service, curfew, or other punishment.

We understand that at the time of the allegations and dispute resolution, a judge, lawyer, adviser, or someone else may have told you the matter would be removed from your record or that your record would be sealed. You still must disclose the incident. The underlying point of this question is to disclose any interaction you have had with the criminal system, regardless of the outcome.

Emory Law requires that you submit information on traffic tickets as well. A simple recitation of the ticket, approximate date, background on the situation and resolution—including any fines or other sanctions—will suffice.

The second part of this question relates to social conduct allegations or violations. This deals with incidents that occurred while in college or other post-secondary education such as noise violations, alcohol citations, disruptive behavior, or other incidents that violated your school’s conduct policy. Even if the allegation, violation, citation, or other reprimand was removed from your record, and regardless of whether someone told you otherwise, you must disclose it to Emory Law.

Sample Scenario 1: Georgette shoplifted from a store when she was 13 years old. As part of the county’s juvenile justice program, she was sent to an alternative juvenile court where a jury of high school peers sentenced her to write a letter of apology. All records of the incident were destroyed, and the incident never appeared on Georgette’s criminal record. Moreover, the supervising attorney coordinating the juvenile court specifically told Georgette she would never need to tell anyone about this incident.

Emory Law requires Georgette disclose this incident.

Sample Scenario 2: During orientation, Sam was cited for playing his radio too loudly in the dorm. The floor RA told Sam never to do it again and required Sam write an e-mail of apology.

Sam should disclose this incident.

Emory University is dedicated to providing equal opportunities and equal access to all individuals regardless of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, and veteran’s status. Emory University does not discriminate in admissions, educational programs, or employment on the basis of any factor stated above or prohibited under applicable law. Students, faculty, and staff are assured of participation in University programs and in the use of facilities without such discrimination. Emory University complies with Executive Order 11246, as amended, Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam Era Veteran’s Readjustment Assistance Act, and applicable executive orders, state and federal regulations regarding non-discrimination, equal opportunity and affirmative action. Emory University is committed to achieving a diverse workforce through application of its affirmative action, equal opportunity and non-discrimination policy in all aspects of employment including recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline, terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, and training. Inquiries regarding this policy should be directed to the Emory University Office of Equal Opportunity Programs, 201 Dowman Drive, Administration Bldg., Atlanta, GA 30322. Telephone 404/727-9867 (V) 404/712-2049 (TDD).

Emory University School of Law adheres to the policies of the Association of American Law Schools on nondiscrimination.

24 University of Florida (Levin) Instructions

University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law

Juris Doctor Applicants

J.D. Application for Fall 2021 Admission Consideration

Regular Decision Application Deadline: July 15, 2021

(see specific deadlines for Options 2 & 3)

* LSAT no later than June, 2021*

Thank you for your interest in University of Florida Levin College of Law. We look forward to reviewing your application.

For complete application instruction details and document descriptions below, please see Standards for JD Admission/JD Application at:

Apply to UF Law

For the Fall 2021 cycle, UF Law is offering two limited application options in addition to the regular decision application. Please carefully review eligibility requirements and obligations of the new options here before making your selection in the Certification section.

* Option 1: Regular Decision Application (Deadline for submission/completion: July 15, 2021)*

UF Law will accept J. D. applications for Regular Decision from September 1, 2020 through July 15, 2021. Although the June 2021 LSAT (the latest considered for the 2021 cycle) will be accepted, earlier exams may increase opportunities for admission and scholarship. We review files on a rolling admissions basis and candidates could be notified of a decision as early as October, 2020, with notifications possibly continuing through early August, 2021. ***** Details here .*****

To apply through the Regular Decision Applicatio *n**,* please select Regular Decision in the Certification section of the application.

* Option 2: UF Law Binding Decision Option (Deadline for submission/completion: March 15, 2021)*

This option is designed only for qualifying applicants who are certain that UF Law is their top choice.* Admissions decisions are binding and students admitted through this option will be required to submit a seat deposit and enrollment form within one week of being admitted. If you are not sure about your choice of law school, you should apply for regular admission. Details here .*****

To apply through the UF Law Binding Decision option , please complete the following steps:

  • Carefully review the details and key dates - click here .
  • Select UF Law Binding Decision option in the Certification section of the application.

* Option 3: Gator Scholars option (Deadline for submission/completion for 1st round consideration: January 15, 2021)*

* This option is designed only for undergraduate seniors at the University of Florida who will complete a Bachelor's degree in Dec. 2020, or by Aug. 2021 and have not taken the LSAT and meet specific SAT or ACT and LSAC-calculated GPA requirements. Details here .*

To apply through the Gator Scholars option* , please complete the following steps:*

  • Carefully review the details and specific requirements - click here .
  • Select the Gator Scholars option in the Certification section of the application.

I. Required Documents

Candidates must ensure that the latest available undergraduate transcripts from each college, university or high school/university dual enrollment program attended are on file with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) , and that they have selected the University of Florida Levin College of Law as one of the law schools to which their CAS Report should be sent. Sending a transcript from only one institution attended is not sufficient even if the transcript contains grades from previous institutions. The law school code for the University of Florida Levin College of Law is 5812.

Upon submission of the application for admission, the CAS report will be automatically requested and sent to the law school as soon as the CAS file is complete at LSAC.

The Levin College of Law seeks to enroll a class with varied backgrounds and academic skills. Such diversity contributes to the learning environment of the law school, and historically has produced graduates who have served all segments of society and who have become leaders in many fields of law. To better assess such qualities, the Levin College of Law requires each applicant to submit a Personal Statement.

The Personal Statement should not exceed four double-spaced pages and should be in a font no smaller than 12 pt.

Please upload the Personal Statement via the LSAC online application website. See "Attachments" tab and select "Personal Statement."

All candidates are required to submit a current and complete résumé or curriculum vitae (CV), which should include specific factual information about education, honors and awards, extracurricular or community activities, publications, work history, military service and/or foreign language proficiencies. Time frames should be clearly defined and descriptions should be detailed.

Please upload your résumé or CVs via the online application website. See "Attachments" tab and select "Résumé."

Character and Fitness (C&F)

Before responding to questions 1-5, please review the "Character and Fitness" (C&F) and "Need for Full Disclosure" section of the Admissions Instructions on the College of Law website .

Questions 1 and 2 in the Character and Fitness section of the application require candidates to report any (Q.1) disciplinary action taken against them at any college or university (associated with code of conduct) , and/or (Q.2) academic probation, warning, suspension and/or dismissal (associated with academic performance) . Questions 3-5 are about specific violations of law, including any traffic violation resulting in a fine over $200, or which resulted in revocation or suspension of a candidate's driver's license.

Candidates answering Yes* to any C&F question must provide a written account of the incident(s) and corresponding official documentation from the applicable college/university or court regarding the* final disposition of each occurrence (for Q.2 academic probations, the college/university transcript supplied for the CAS is usually sufficient documentation). Official documents must clearly identify the agency that is providing the disposition of the incident. Official documents obtained from an online source must include a web address (URL). Your application will not be considered complete until the Admissions Office has received these items.

The Levin College of Law strongly prefers that your explanation and all official documents be combined in one attachment to this application. Official documents that cannot be submitted as an attachment may be submitted to the Levin College of Law via email, mail, or fax.

* After submitting the application* , candidates are obligated to immediately notify the Levin College of Law of any changes in data (including character & fitness) that occur either prior to a decision or matriculation, and provide related explanations and documentation when applicable.

Please note that, based on the incident(s) disclosed, the University Admissions office may also request additional information including relevant court documents. It is the responsibility of the candidate to provide all documentation for each * Yes* response.

If your records have been expunged pursuant to applicable law, you are not required to answer Yes* to question 3, 4 or 5 with respect to that particular charge. It is your responsibility to know whether your records have been expunged. You should be aware that a state Board of Bar Examiners investigation into your fitness to practice law can extend beyond the scope of this question (as well as questions 1 and 2), and you might be required to disclose expunged records as well as any convictions or charges that you are required to disclose in answering these questions. If you are unsure whether to answer Yes* , we strongly recommend answering * Yes* and fully disclosing all incidents. By doing so, you can avoid risk of disciplinary action and/or revocation of an admission offer. For a summary of the states’ bar admission requirements, please refer to the National Conference of Bar Examiners ( www.ncbex.org ).

Candidates are required to submit one (1) letter of recommendation , and UF Law will accept up to four (4) letters. Recommenders should evaluate in detail the candidate's academic performance and skills, academic activities, community service, and/or employment.

LSAC Letter of Recommendation (LOR) service: The Levin College of Law strongly prefers that letters be submitted through the LSAC LOR service included with the CAS registration. (Recommenders providing an LOR after application submission should use the LSAC LOR service, but may provide the LOR directly to UF Law.)

Please Note:

If your recommender is submitting your letter of recommendation on paper, you must print the required LOR Form from your LSAC.org account and deliver it to your recommender. This form must accompany your letter of recommendation. Paper letters received without an accompanying LOR Form or without the recommender’s signature will be returned to the recommender.

If your recommender is sending more than one letter for you (for different institutions), be sure to emphasize the importance of attaching the correct form to the corresponding letter.

Please allow LSAC two weeks from the time of receipt to process your paper letters.

While the Levin College of Law is unable to acknowledge receipt of letters, candidates may verify receipt of documents using the Application Status Online.

ACT or SAT results *(ONLY for Gator Scholars option applicants)*

Applicants through the Gator Scholars option must provide a copy of their official* ACT or SAT results. Your ACT composite score or SAT mathematics and critical reading total score must be at or above the 85th percentile* for the administration of the exam that you took.

Please upload your ACT or SAT results via the online application website. See "Attachments" tab and select "ACT or SAT score".

II. Optional Documents

Why UF Law?

We would like to know why you have chosen to apply. Most candidates can communicate these interests in one or two short paragraphs. You may also share if you are directly connected to UF or UF Law through alumni, professors, or other ways.

Please upload this optional statement via the online application website. See “Attachments” tab and select “Why UF Law”.

Diversity and Inclusion Statement

The Levin College of Law values and seeks a diverse student body to achieve its mission of excellence in education, research and service. Diversity encompasses life experiences, socioeconomic background, ethnicity and race, gender and other attributes, and provides multi-cultural learning opportunities that prepare students for success in an increasingly diverse society.

Candidates may submit a statement describing the diverse life experience, attributes, and skills that they possess, including relevant specific experiences. Candidates should also address how such skills and experiences would advance diversity, and foster an inclusive environment at the Levin College of Law. The statement should focus on unique interests, abilities, and personal experience (including, but not limited, to information about socioeconomic background, first-generation status, gender, ethnicity and race and other attributes). Text from the Personal Statement should not be repeated in the Diversity Statement.

The Diversity Statement should not exceed two double-spaced pages and should be in a font no smaller than 12 pt.

The Levin College of Law requests that applicants upload the Diversity Statement via the online application website. See "Attachments" tab and select "Diversity Statement".

Addenda and Other Materials

Candidates who wish to discuss any unique situations may upload a one-page addendum with the application. This document might include, but need not be limited to, information about poor grade progression, history of standardized testing, linguistic barriers, or a personal or family history of educational or socioeconomic disadvantage.

Please upload any addenda, including required Character and Fitness explanations/documentation, via the LSAC online application. See "Attachments" tab and select the appropriate addendum title.

The following should not be included with your application: additional writing samples, newspaper/magazine articles, photographs, etc.

* (Candidates are encouraged to keep copies of their applications for their reference.)*

III. Other Important Requirements

Non-Refundable Application Fee

The Levin College of Law charges a $30 application fee. This fee is collected by LSAC when the application is submitted. The application fee is automatically waived for LSAC fee waiver recipients and for applicants who receive a fee waiver from the Levin College of Law.

Application fees are non-refundable. The $30 application fee cannot be refunded to candidates who might qualify for a waiver, but submit their application before receiving one. Also, please note that the fee waiver process begins anew each application cycle and the information above is effective at the beginning of each cycle. A fee waiver is valid only for the particular application cycle during which it is issued.

Residency Declaration

ALL candidates, regardless of Florida or Non-Florida residency status , should complete the required State of Florida Residency Declaration for tuition purposes . Within 5-7 days after submitting your application, you will receive an email (check spam) from the University Admissions office providing instructions to set-up your myAdmissions account where you will access the residency declaration. Applicants claiming Florida residency are required to provide supporting documentation, and in some situations may also be asked to provide their activities and locations during the 12-month period prior to desired enrollment. Until Florida residency is determined, tuition charges will be at the Non-Florida resident rate.

Please note that the Levin College of Law does not have jurisdiction over residency matters. All decisions on residency are made by the University’s Graduate Admissions Office in accordance with Florida State Statute, 1009.21. The University’s Graduate Admissions Office may request additional supporting documentation to verify residency classification for tuition purposes. Applicants may contact UF Graduate Admissions Office directly with concerns or questions at (352) 392-1365.

IV. Information Regarding SSN/SIN Number

The Federal Privacy Act of 1974 and Section 119.071(5)(a)2, 5(a)3 and 5(a)4 of Florida Statutes authorizes the university to require the disclosure of Social Security numbers by applicants and students for the purpose of identification and verification of student records, including registration, financial aid and academic records and for verification of identity in the provision of university services.

The University does not use your Social Security Number for student identification. It is only used to assign your UF student identification number (UFID).

27 Fordham University Instructions

We strongly encourage applicants to submit their application through the Law School Admissions Council ( www.lsac.org ). Should you require a paper application, please email your request to [email protected] , with your name and mailing address and it will be sent to you within 5 – 7 business days.

The application fee is $70.

If you are applying electronically through LSAC, you will need to pay the fee using a major credit card. If applying through a paper copy, please send a check or money order (payable to Fordham Law School) along with your application to:

Personal Statement:

A written essay or statement on the topic of your choice, which should not exceed two pages, double spaced.

This should illustrate your chronological work history. While one page is preferred, you may submit a resume that is longer but please utilize discretion when determining your resume length.

Letters of Recommendation:

We require all applicants to submit two (2) letters of recommendation with your application. We strongly prefer that you utilize the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service that is included as part of the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) registration. Your CAS report will not be released to us until we have the required two letters of recommendation to complete your file.

OPTIONAL SUPPLEMENTAL STATEMENTS

Applicants are welcome to submit brief supplemental statements that will provide useful information to the Admissions Committee when evaluating their application. The Committee especially finds helpful, statements that allow them to further understand your personal background and how it can contribute to the greater Fordham Law community.

ELIGIBILITY

Applicants for admissions as candidates for the degree of Juris Doctor at Fordham Law School must:

  • ​ Be at least 18 years of age upon starting the first-year class.
  • ​ Have taken the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) on or after June 2016 but no later than February 2021.
  • ​ Not have been dismissed from another law school regardless of the time elapsed since dismissal.
  • ​ Have graduated from an American college or university accredited by an agency approved by the American Bar Association.

27 University of California—Irvine Instructions

Uci law jd application instructions.

To be eligible for admission to University of California, Irvine School of Law’s Juris Doctor program, you must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university or have completed the equivalent of six semesters and expect to graduate during the current academic year prior to the start of law school in Fall 2021.

Typically, the Admissions Committee selects the first-year class from a pool of over 3,000 applicants. Decisions are based on a number of factors, including academic records, personal essays, optional essays, recommendation letters, standardized test results, extracurricular activities, leadership, personal circumstances, and work experience.

There is no application fee for those applying for admission for enrollment to UCI Law as a first-year student for Fall 2021.

All applicants must provide a signature electronically at the end of this application form to certify the information provided.

Required Application Materials

A completed application to UCI Law consists of the following materials sent to us electronically either attached to your Application for Admission or within your CAS report:

  • A personal statement
  • “Why UCI?” statement
  • A current résumé or CV (electronically attached to your Application for Admission)
  • LSAT/LSAT-flex or GRE results (including writing samples)
  • The Credential Assembly Service Report, which includes your LSAT results & LSAT writing, if applicable, and previous transcripts (sent to us electronically by LSAC)
  • If applicable, conduct or character and fitness disclosures
  • Additionally, you may also include a response to any or all three optional essay prompts.

Although the Office of Admissions seeks to keep you informed of the status of your application, it is your responsibility to ensure that all parts of your application are received. You may check the status of your application via the Online Application Status Check system for which you will be emailed access instructions after receipt of your application. To receive this email, you must apply with a valid email address.

Applicants will be notified of their decisions electronically, therefore it is imperative that the email provided remains correct. Decisions will not be sent via U.S. mail, nor will decisions be provided over the phone.

We require that all applicants complete their JD application to UCI Law via the LSAC electronic application portal.

In preparing any of your essay responses or Character and Fitness/Conduct Information Statement, you should use Microsoft Word and format all your documents to 8-1/2 x 11 inches, double spaced, with 12-point font and one-inch margins. Most importantly, please include your name, LSAC number, and statement type (e.g. personal statement, Why UCI Law essay, etc.) in the top header of each page and abide by any word limit.

If you have difficulty with the electronic application or lack access to a computer, you may request a PDF copy of the application. Please contact the Office of Admissions at [email protected] . Being granted use of a PDF copy of the application does not absolve the applicant of all other requirements.

Required Essays: Personal Statement and “Why UCI?”

The personal statement is your opportunity to introduce yourself to the Admissions Committee and distinguish yourself from other applicants. You may discuss, among other topics, your personal or professional goals, or highlights from your personal, academic, or career history. The choice of topic is truly your own; it should be personal to you.

When reviewing your application for admission, especially your personal statement, the Admissions Committee is most concerned about who you are and your writing ability. The personal statements that are most favorably received are those that represent your authentic self/voice.

As a young law school, the Admissions Committee is also concerned with how strong your interest is in the Law School and your potential fit within our community.

Please do not send revisions to either required essay after you have submitted your application.

Word limit: 750 words for each required essay.

Letter of Recommendation (LOR)

Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. You may also submit an additional LOR for a total of three (3) made for this cycle. The letters should be completed by someone who may evaluate your academic performance (e.g., college professor) or your professional performance (e.g., current or former supervisor, client, or co-worker). The Committee discourages purely personal references.

Please be certain to designate UC Irvine Law as a recipient of these letters through your CAS account.

Credential Assembly Service Report

The Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Report contains a summary of each applicant’s academic work and LSAT results, as well as at least one LSAT writing sample (if applying with the LSAT). It also includes copies of college transcripts.

You are required to register for CAS. Please request official transcripts from all your undergraduate institutions (and graduate schools, if applicable) be sent directly to LSAC and included in your CAS account, regardless of age or amount of credits earned. Although LSAC attempts to inform each applicant about the receipt of transcripts, you are responsible for ensuring all transcripts are received by LSAC.

If you received your undergraduate degree from an educational institution outside the United States, its territories, and Canada, you are also required to register with CAS and have your transcripts and any other required documentation sent to LSAC for processing and evaluation. LSAC will then forward your complete CAS report to the Law School. International transcripts often take more time; please allow for this when requesting and transmitting the transcripts.

LSAT results are sent directly to the Law School from LSAC as part of your CAS report. Therefore, if you have taken the LSAT and have a valid reported score on file, it cannot be waived from your application. During the 2020-2021 cycle, the LSAT is offered eight times. Applicants may register for the LSAT through the LSAC website.

In the alternative, applicants may submit their GRE result(s) for the Admissions Committee to consider if they have not taken the LSAT or do not have a valid LSAT score on file. If you elect to submit your GRE scores for consideration and have taken the GRE more than once in the last five years then you must submit all valid GRE results. GRE results are sent directly to UCI from ETS. UCI Law uses the graduate school's GRE school code which is 4859. Please see the application form for additional directions.

To be sure that your application is completed on time, early decision applicants should take the LSAT no later than October 2020. Similarly, regular decision applicants should take either the LSAT or GRE no later than February 2020 so that if admitted, you have the best opportunity to potentially participate in UCI Law’s Admitted Student Weekend program. Although later test results (through the April LSAT or GRE by May 1) are permitted, waiting for these results may delay review of your application. The Admissions Committee will not hold an application, if otherwise complete, for a future standardized test unless it will be the first test.

Additional information can be found on our website, https://www.law.uci.edu/admission/apply/.

The optional essay is your final opportunity to give the Admissions Committee additional information that you may be unable to incorporate into your personal statement or “Why UCI?” essay. The three topics you may cover are (1) the diversity you celebrate and contribute to UCI Law’s commitment to inclusive excellence, (2) your performance on standardized tests, and/or (3) a GPA addendum. You may answer all three (3) prompts, but the total word count must not exceed 750 words. Please do not send revisions of optional essays after application submission.

Applications for Admission are accepted from September 1 to March 15 and are reviewed on a rolling basis beginning in late November with Early Decision applicants reviewed first. Applicants should complete the application process as early as possible, as an early application often yields an early decision.

If your materials are received and file complete by the March 15 deadline, you will be notified of your decision by the end of April.

The Law School may exclude from consideration any application submitted after March 15 or any application that is incomplete as of the end of the standardized testing window. Applications are considered only for the current year and for full-time registration. UCI Law does not offer an evening program or mid-year entry.

Applicants who have thoroughly researched their law school options and have identified UCI Law as their first-choice law school may wish to apply through the Early Decision program.

UCI Law’s Early Decision program is binding. If admitted through the Early Decision program, you must commit to matriculating at UCI Law and submit a nonrefundable $750 seat deposit by the date(s) indicated with your admission letter. You must also withdraw all your applications to other schools and refrain from initiating any new applications. You may not be an Early Decision candidate at more than one law school.

To be considered for the Early Decision program, your application must be complete by November 15, including your Credential Assembly Service Report. Accordingly, it is in your best interest to submit your application prior to November 15 to ensure all materials are received in time. The last acceptable LSAT score for Early Decision consideration is from the October 2020 administration.

Early Decision applicants must have at least one valid LSAT result. Since UCI Law is in year 2 of a 3-year pilot regarding the use of the GRE, applicants applying with a GRE are ineligible to apply for admission through the Early Decision program.

Finally, you must sign and return the Early Decision Certification directly to the Office of Admissions. Your Early Decision Certification will not be transmitted by the Credential Assembly Service, so please do not upload it to your application. You have three options to return the Early Decision Certification:

  • You may electronically sign and e-mail the Early Decision Certification to [email protected] . To electronically sign, you must download the Early Decision Certification and open it in Adobe (not your browser). Your electronic signature, must be the electronic signature as populated by Adobe. The signature cannot just be a script version of your name, a printed version with “/s/” before it, or another facsimile.
  • You may print the Early Decision Certification, sign it in ink, scan it back as a PDF and e-mail it to [email protected] .
  • You may print the Early Decision Certification, sign it in ink, and mail it back to the Office of Admissions. If you choose this third option, the Early Decision Certification must be physically in hand (not postmarked or at the University) by November 15. You will find the mailing address on the website.

It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure the Early Decision Certification is received and in a format that is readable. If your application file is not complete by the deadline, it will be converted to regular decision.

The Early Decision deadline is November 15, 2020 for the Fall 2021 admissions cycle. Early Decision candidates will be notified of their decisions by the end of December. If an Early Decision candidate is not successful in securing admission through the Early Decision program, their application will be rolled-over into the regular decision pool. Rolled-over Early Decision applications will receive a decision by March 1; no revised or additional items will be accepted.

Concurrent Degree Program

Through the Program in Law & Graduate Studies (PLGS), students at the University of California, Irvine can pursue a J.D. from the Law School concurrently with a master’s or Ph.D. in virtually any UCI graduate program. Designed to be one of the broadest programs of its kind, PLGS allows enormous latitude and options – giving students a chance to combine law with graduate research degrees in such areas as humanities, social sciences, life sciences, information and computer sciences, physical sciences and engineering, or with graduate professional degrees in business, urban planning, education, and public health.

PLGS was created to promote interdisciplinary study of law while also enabling students to obtain both a J.D. and an M.A., M.B.A., M.S. or Ph.D. in less time than would be required to earn both degrees separately. The normative time for completion of the program is four years for J.D./Master's and J.D./M.B.A. and seven years for J.D./Ph.D. combinations.

While applicants must also submit a separate application to the eligible graduate program of their choice, they should also indicate their interest within various parts of this application including the “Why UCI?” essay. Applicants must comply with the admissions requirements of each program separately.

Securing your seat in the class

In order to secure their spot in the Fall 2021 entering class, all admitted applicants will be required to submit both an affirmative Statement of Intent to Register and pay a nonrefundable seat deposit no later than the date(s) indicated with their offer of admission.

The Office of Admissions maintains applications from previous years in accordance with the UC records retention policy. However, the Admissions Committee requires reapplicants to submit a full application, including updated application materials, for the current admission cycle. The updated application will enable the re-applicant to adequately present information that has changed since their original/previous application(s).

UCI Law offers a comprehensive financial aid program designed to enable any admitted student to attend the law school, regardless of financial need. To that end, the majority of scholarships awarded are based on merit.

To be considered for need-based grants and federal financial aid, students must submit the 2021-2022 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by February 2, 2021. UCI Law's Federal School Code is 001314 . Students who are not eligible to file a FAFSA and qualify for the CA AB540 fee exemption can apply for certain types of financial aid by completing the California Dream Application .

International students do not need to file a FAFSA, as they are not eligible to receive federal financial aid. However, they may be eligible for scholarships and private educational loans. To apply for a Private Educational Loan, submit an application with the lender of your choice and inform UCI Law’s Student Financial Services Office of your pending application. You may use any lender, but we suggest that you compare loan terms with those on our Preferred Lender List . Applying for financial aid is separate from the admissions process, and financial aid information has no bearing on admissions decisions.

Required Disclosure

Please note that federal regulations require higher education programs that are intended to meet professional licensure and certification requirements to disclose to students whether the program meets licensure and certification requirements in other states. The regulations, which were enacted on November 1, 2019, can be found at 34 CFR §668.43(a)(5)(v) (https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2019-23129.pdf).

The License and Certification Disclosures for the University of California can be found here: https://www.ucop.edu/institutional-research-academic-planning/content-analysis/academic-planning/licensure-and-certification-disclosures.html

27 University of Iowa Instructions

Your interest in the College of Law is appreciated. We are proud of the excellence of our academic programs and believe that our students find the University and the community a satisfying and rewarding place to further their education. We hope that you will have an opportunity to see the law campus. To schedule a visit, contact the College of Law Admissions Office.

Answer every question that applies to you. Make sure your name appears at the top of each page of written material that you attach to this application.

Personal Information

List your name as you would like it to appear on all University records (or as it appears on your passport). If your name changes prior to your enrollment, please notify the Office of Admissions in writing.

US Social Security Number

We will use your Social Security number to verify your identity for record-keeping purposes and to help match transcripts and other materials with your admission application. It will not be used as your student ID number. Your Social Security number will be safeguarded by the University and will not be displayed on official records or made available to others. If you do not have a Social Security number, leave this item blank.

Current Mailing/Permanent Address

From August 15 through May 15, we will mail materials to you at your current mailing address. From May 16 through August 15, your permanent address will be used. Please notify both the Office of Admissions and the College of Law of any address changes.

Citizenship

Applicants who select "other" must provide their country of citizenship and immigration status (e.g., F1, J1, refugee, asylee, applicant for Permanent Resident card).

Ethnic/Racial/Tribal Affiliation Information

Your response to this item is voluntary (international students may proceed to the next item). To comply with the US Department of Education regulations concerned with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, the University of Iowa must report statistical summaries of the student body. This information is held confidential and does not appear on academic records. Information regarding individual students is not disclosed outside the University without the student's written consent. The following are definitions of the categories listed:

Hispanic/Latino(a): a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

Alaska Native or American Indian: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.

African American/Black: a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

Asian: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

White: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East.

Educational Information

Post-secondary education.

This listing must be complete. Include every institution attended, regardless of the duration of study, type of enrollment (i.e., extension, correspondence, etc.), or whether you earned a diploma or degree.

English Proficiency for Nonnative Speakers

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores are required except for applicants who:

  • have completed a bachelor's degree at an accredited university in the United States
  • have an equivalent degree at an accredited university in Australia, Canada (excluding Quebec), Ireland, New Zealand, or the United Kingdom
  • submit acceptable alternative evidence of a high degree of proficiency in English.

Scores must be reported to the University directly from the testing agency. Our TOEFL school code is 6681. For more information, visit www.ets.org/toefl . You may submit IELTS or DuoLingo scores as an alternative to TOEFL.

Statement in Determination of Residency

The classification of residents and nonresidents for admission, fees, and tuition purposes is based upon information furnished by you. If this information changes, notify us. The registrar is authorized to require additional evidence as deemed necessary to verify your status.

Have an official copy of your score(s) sent directly to the College of Law.

The College of Law requires at least two but no more than three letters of recommendation. Recommendations from professors or others who can comment on your critical thinking, writing skills, and your potential for success in law school are particularly welcome. We participate in the Letter of Recommendation Service offered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) as part of the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) registration.

The personal statement is required for all applicants. The personal statement should be limited to two to three pages.

A description of any employment, academic, or research experience should be included in a one- to two-page résumé.

Additional Information

The application deadline is May 1. However, we highly encourage you to submit your application by February 15, since space availability in the admitted group becomes a more important part of the decision-making process during the weeks leading up to May 1. Fall (August) is the beginning of the three-year program. Law school policy does not allow for less than full-time attendance.

The University of Iowa College of Law does not require an application fee.

Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores older than five years are not accepted.

Applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service, which includes submitting official transcripts from each college or university attended (including summer session enrollments). This required report must be received before your application can be considered.

Transcripts and Credentials

The University of Iowa requires official transcripts from applicants who are accepted. They must arrive in a sealed envelope mailed directly from the institution. Credentials submitted for admission become the property of the University and are not returnable or transferable.

To hold their respective places in the class, applicants are required to submit nonrefundable deposits. These nonrefundable deposits are credited toward tuition and fees for those who enroll. Applicants who fail to make these deposits within the specified time forfeit their place in the entering class.

Applicants accepted before March 15 must submit the $250 deposit by April 1. Applicants accepted after March 15 have two weeks to submit this deposit. Applicants must pay a second deposit of $150 by June 1.

Admission is for the year of application. Deferrals are not generally granted except in extraordinary circumstances.

Financial Assistance

Contact the College of Law at 319-335-9142 or [email protected] for information about scholarships and loans.

Return Application Materials Promptly

Apply electronically via LSAC.

Mail supporting materials directly to:

College of Law Admissions Office The University of Iowa 280 Boyd Law Building Iowa City, IA 52242 USA

How to Reach Us

Office of Admissions Direct-dial number: 319-335-1525; e-mail: [email protected] ; website: www.uiowa.edu

College of Law Admissions Office Direct-dial number: 319-335-9095; e-mail: [email protected] ; website: http://law.uiowa.edu

Iowa Statement

27 university of north carolina instructions, 31 boston college instructions, instructions: boston college law school.

To apply for admission, you must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university prior to entering law school, have taken the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), including at least one writing sample (either from a previous paper-and-pencil administration of the LSAT or from LSAT Writing) within the past five years, and register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) .

Please Note: As of September 1, 2020, Boston College Law School will accept both the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and Graduate Record Exam (GRE). All applicants who have taken the LSAT or GRE exam(s) prior to June 1, 2015, will need to retake the exam for a score to be considered current and accepted by the admissions committee. For those applicants taking both the LSAT and GRE, the admissions committee will record and report the highest LSAT score in our review process. Applicants must submit all GRE test scores to Boston College Law School. Any applicant that indicates a future test date, either LSAT or GRE, will have their application held until that score has been received. Please contact Educational Testing Service (ETS) for more information. Boston College's ETS code is 4882.

In addition, you must submit:

The completed and signed electronic application. Applications submitted to LSAC for transmission to Boston College Law School will be considered submitted on the day that they are electronically transmitted.

A personal statement that demonstrates your capacity for the study of law. Many applicants submit a personal statement about a major life experience that has shaped their world view, overcoming a difficult challenge, or unique personal traits that they would bring to the BC Law community. In crafting your personal statement, you may wish to consider one of the aforementioned topics, or you may choose a topic of your own. Your personal statement should not exceed three pages (double-spaced) with a minimum of one-inch margins and 10-point font size.

The non-refundable application fee of $75 USD.

A minimum of two (2) and a maximum of three (3) letters of recommendation, either academic or professional. Public Service Scholarship applicants must also submit an additional letter of recommendation from a professional or academic reference specific to your qualifications for the Public Service Scholarship; this letter of recommendation should be addressed to the Public Service Awards Committee and will be your third letter of recommendation submitted to Boston College Law School, in addition to the two required letters of recommendations. All letters of recommendations must be submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation (LOR) Service .

Official transcripts from all institutions of higher education attended, regardless of whether or not a degree was sought. Transcripts should be sent directly to the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Boston College Law School requires that your foreign transcripts be submitted through the LSAC's Credential Assembly Service Authentication and Evaluation (CAS A&E) . Your application will not be considered complete if transcripts are missing, unacknowledged, or otherwise unavailable in your CAS report. The only exception to this requirement is if you completed foreign work through a study abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by an American or Canadian institution of higher education, and the work is clearly indicated as such on the sponsoring institution's transcript.

** *Addendum (Optional)*

**If you believe that your LSAT score(s) and/or GPA are not reflective of your ability and potential to succeed in law school, you may upload an addendum detailing relevant facts and circumstances. You are not required to submit an addendum. Your addendum should not exceed one page (double-spaced) with a minimum of one-inch margins and 10-point font size.

Optional Statement

You may upload an optional statement, regarding any economic, cultural, social, or other factors that you wish for us to consider when reviewing your application. You are not required to submit an optional statement. Your optional statement should not exceed two pages (double-spaced) with a minimum of one-inch margins and 10-point font size.

Rolling Admissions

We accept applications from mid-September through March for the following August's entering class. Because we have a rolling admissions process and begin reviewing completed files long before the application deadline, we urge you to submit your application well before the March 31 deadline.

Scholarships and Financial Aid

All admitted students are automatically considered for merit-based scholarship awards. Review for merit-based scholarship awards begins in mid-February. We do not negotiate scholarships. Regardless of your application status, you should submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after if you wish to be considered for federal financial aid. The FAFSA code for Boston College is 002128 .

You are advised that there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar. We encourage you, prior to matriculation, to determine what the requirements are in the state(s) where you intend to practice.

31 University of Alabama Instructions

Fall 2021 jd program.

University of Alabama School of Law

Law School Admissions Office

Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0382

205.348.5440 [email protected]

www.law.ua.edu

An applicant must submit the following:

  • Dated and signed School of Law application. You may apply to the University of Alabama School of Law by completing an electronic application through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). www.lsac.org .
  • $40.00 nonrefundable application fee. The fee may be paid online through LSAC or by check or money order directly to the Law School. Checks or money orders should be made payable to The University of Alabama. Please do not send cash . We will waive the application fee for the following: 1) veterans and current members of the United States military; 2) current or former Teach For America and AmeriCorps members; and 3) current and former Peace Corps volunteers. To request any of these waivers, send an email to [email protected] .
  • One essay. The School of Law is especially interested in learning about you and how you will contribute to your class and the law school community. Your essay should not speak in generalities, and it should not simply repeat your résumé. You should describe events or character traits that are not obvious from the other information in your application. Your essay might address adversities you have faced and how you overcame them, an experience or person that impacted your life, or specific goals for your legal career.
  • Letter of Recommendation . At least one letter of recommendation is required. The best letters are those from professors, employers, or others who assess your analytical abilities, writing, and intellectual development.
  • Résumé. Please submit a résumé that includes at least your last three positions of full-time employment, including summer employment. Please also include honors, activities, and community and volunteer service.
  • Supplementary page providing details if you answer "Yes" to any portion of the Disciplinary and Criminal History section. If you have questions about any part of this section, please call the Law School Admissions Office. You should be aware that state bar associations may require disclosure of all criminal matters and may consider these matters in bar admissions decisions. In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners at https://ncbex.org . A J.D. degree from the University of Alabama School of Law, an ABA-accredited law school, satisfies the degree requirement needed to practice law in any U.S. jurisdiction. However, the bar of each jurisdiction may impose other requirements to practice law, such as character and fitness qualifications and / or specific coursework. Admission to the School of Law does not guarantee that an applicant will satisfy the character and fitness review of a state bar.
  • LSAT Score or GRE Score. The School of Law requires that you submit an LSAT Score or a GRE Score. If you have an LSAT score or plan to take the LSAT, you must indicate this on your application and your highest LSAT score will be the primary score used in the admissions decision. For the GRE score, you must request an official GRE score report from Educational Testing Service (ETS) that includes all scores from the last five years. Please indicate the School of Law as a recipient of your test scores. The School of Law GRE school code is 4627 . For more information on submitting official score reports, please visit the ETS website. The Law School accepts GRE scores that are no more than five years old. Although the LSAT is not required to apply to the Law School, a score may be necessary for an applicant to apply to another law school as an incoming first-year student or to apply to transfer to another law school after the first year.
  • Completed Credential Assembly Service (CAS) file. An applicant must register for the Credential Assembly Service and the file must be complete, with all transcripts from universities and colleges attended and at least one letter of recommendation, before the Admissions Committee will review. It is the applicant’s responsibility to register with CAS and to ensure that all transcripts, fees, and letters of recommendation have been received by LSAC . If you received your degree from an institution outside the U.S., you also must register for the Credential Assembly Service authentication and evaluation service. LSAC provides an applicant with status information via the LSAC website at www.LSAC.org .
  • If you are an international applicant and English is not your primary language, an official TOEFL score report must be sent from Educational Test Service (ETS) to LSAC to include with your Credential Assembly Service. The score must be no more than 2 years old.

31 University of Georgia Instructions

Admission & financial aid calendar, 2020–2021, standard admissions process.

(1) School of Law Application. A completed School of Law application and all required supporting materials must be received by the School of Law Office of Admissions by June 1, 2021, in order to be considered for admission to the 2021 entering class. For priority merit scholarship consideration, applications should be completed and received in the Office of Admissions by February 1, 2021. Applications received or completed after the deadline may be considered by the Admissions Committee at its discretion. Application materials should be submitted from your LSAC.org account. Any materials sent directly to the School of Law should be mailed to the following address:

Except for 3+3 applicants,as detailed below, applicants need not possess a baccalaureate degree at the time the application for admission is submitted. However, in order to register for classes, proof that the degree has been conferred is required.

Items to accompany the application form include:

(a.) Admission Essay. Each applicant is required to provide a brief personal statement.

(b.) Application and Processing Fee. All applicants are required to pay a $50 non-refundable application and processing fee. This fee must be paid online through LSAC.org .

(2) Standardized Test.

LSAT Instructions : All applicants must have a reportable Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score unless applying as a UGA Scholars applicant (see the section below labeled UGA Scholars). Applicants for the 2021 entering class must take the LSAT no later than the June 2021 test administration and are encouraged to register for an earlier administration. Test scores beginning with the June 2015 test administration are acceptable. Registration materials for the LSAT may be obtained at LSAC.org .

(3) LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS). All applicants must register with the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) and have an LSAC Law School Report sent to the School of Law. Transcripts of all academic work, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional schools, must be sent to the CAS. All coursework taken before fall semester (quarter) 2020, must be forwarded to the CAS for the report. The resulting law school report, which includes LSAT score(s) and copies of all transcripts, is sent to the School of Law if no problems exist with the applicant's file at LSAC.

Foreign-educated applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service and submit their transcripts through the authentication and evaluation feature of the CAS. Except for foreign work through a study abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, transcripts for all post-secondary work completed outside of the United States, its territories, or Canada must be evaluated by this service. The service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration fee.

(4) Letters of Recommendation. Applicants must provide two letters of recommendation. It is preferred that the letters of recommendation be no more than two years old. We prefer letters from professors, employers or other recommenders who can attest to your ability to enter a competitive professional program. If you have been out of school for multiple years, employer references will suffice. Applicants are required to use the letter of recommendation service provided by LSAC. Applicants using the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service must use the Letter of Recommendation Form provided on LSAC.org .

(5) Resume. Submit a resume detailing your education, employment, skills, honors, awards, and accomplishments. Upload document as an attachment to the application form.

Binding Early Decision

The Early Decision program is designed for students who have considered their law school options carefully and are confident that the University of Georgia School of Law is their clear first choice. Failure to honor this commitment will result in the University of Georgia School of Law revoking its offer of admission. Early Decision applications must be submitted by December 1, 2020. All application components, including letters of recommendation and the law school report, must be received by the Office of Admissions by December 15, 2020. An Early Decision applicant must take the LSAT no later than the November administration. Early Decision applicants must sign the Early Decision Statement certification at the end of the application.

UGA Scholars Applicant

This admissions process is only open to applicants who have received or will receive their undergraduate degree from the University of Georgia or who are seeking a graduate degree from the University of Georgia. Qualified University of Georgia undergraduates may apply to the University of Georgia School of Law without the previously required LSAT score. Qualified applicants must possess a minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.50 and must have scored at or above the 85th percentile nationally at the time the test was administered on either:

the SAT or ACT if seeking a J.D. degree at the School of Law; or

the GRE or GMAT if seeking a dual degree at the School of Law.

Based on ABA requirements, the School of Law is only able to enroll a certain percentage of the class as part of the UGA Scholars process. Once the School of Law admits this set percentage, the UGA Scholars process will be closed . The UGA Scholars process application deadline is October 1, 2020 . All application components, including letters of recommendation and the LSAC Law School Report, must be received by the Office of Admissions by October 1, 2020 . Applicants with an LSAT score cannot be admitted through the UGA Scholars process. Applicants with an LSAT score will be considered through the Standard Admissions Process.

Applicants must submit an application to the School of Law through www.lsac.org . UGA Scholars applicants should follow the same application completion instructions for standard admissions found online at: http://www.law.uga.edu/entering-students. In the Additional Tests section of the application, applicants should enter the following information:

  • Please indicate the test (SAT, ACT, GMAT or GRE) and enter your score
  • Please indicate the month and year when you took the SAT, ACT, GMAT or GRE test

After you submit your application on www.lsac.org , please send an email to Brandi Saunders, Law Admissions Enrollment Management Specialist, at [email protected] stating you have applied through the UGA Scholars process.

Admission is not guaranteed based on meeting the required credentials alone. Each application receives a holistic review. The Office of Admissions will release decisions on UGA Scholars applications after the October 1st deadline . The deposit deadline for UGA Scholars admitted students is January 31, 2021.

Applicants who intend to apply to law schools other than the University of Georgia School of Law or apply through the Early Decision or Standard Admission Process will need to take the LSAT to be considered for admission. Candidates should also be aware that School of Law students matriculating under the UGA Scholars process will not be eligible to transfer to another law school after the 1L year without an LSAT score. The UGA Scholars program is designed for UGA undergraduate students who have considered their law school options carefully and are confident that the University of Georgia School of Law is their top choice.

3+3 Applicant

This admissions process is only open to applicants who are currently enrolled as undergraduate students at the University of Georgia in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, the School for Public and International Affairs, the Grady College of Journalism, and the Terry College of Business. Qualified University of Georgia undergraduates may apply to the University of Georgia School of Law during the Spring Semester of their 3rd or Junior Year of Undergraduate Study, and begin Juris Doctor course work full time during their 4th or Senior year of Undergraduate Study if admitted.

The 3+3 Admissions Process application deadline is June 1, 2021 . All application components, including letters of recommendation and the LSAC Law School Report, must be received by the Office of Admissions by June 30, 2021 . Applicants with the required credentials who intend to apply to the University of Georgia School of Law through the 3+3 Admissions must take the LSAT no later than April 2020 to be considered for this process, and they must provide documentation from their undergraduate advisor that they have completed or will complete all of their major requirements by the end of their 3rd or Junior Year of Undergraduate Study.

Applicants must submit an application to the School of Law through www.lsac.org . 3+3 Admissions Process applicants should follow the same application completion instructions for standard admissions found online at: http://www.law.uga.edu/entering-students.

After you submit your application on www.lsac.org , please send an email to Brandi Saunders, Law Admissions Enrollment Management Specialist, at [email protected] stating you have applied to the University of Georgia School of Law through the 3+3 Admissions Process.

Admission is not guaranteed based on meeting the required credentials alone. Each application receives a holistic review. The University of Georgia School of Law will release decisions on 3+3 Admissions Process applicants on a rolling basis. Students who are not granted admission through the 3+3 Admissions Process are still eligible to apply the following year or after graduation.

Applicants for admission to the 2021 entering class will not be able to use any previously submitted materials.

Applicants for admission to the 2020 entering class who did not enroll must pay the application fee and submit a new application and supporting materials in order to be considered for the 2021 entering class. Updated transcripts must be sent to the LSAC, and a new law school report must be provided.

Notes to All Applicants

Non-discrimination policy.

© 2020 University of Georgia School of Law. The University of Georgia is a unit of the University of System of Georgia. The University of Georgia does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information or military service in its administrations of educational policies, programs, or activities; its admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; athletic or other University-administered programs; or employment. Inquiries or complaints should be directed to the Equal Opportunity Office 119 Holmes-Hunter Academic Building, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602. Telephone 706-542-7912 (V/TDD). Fax 706-542-2822. https://eoo.uga.edu/policies/non-discrimination-anti-harassment-policy

Campus Security Report

31 university of illinois—urbana champaign instructions, university of illinois college of law admissions timeline.

September 1: College of Law begins accepting applications.

October 1: Earliest date to submit FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid www.fafsa.ed.gov) to begin financial aid process. FAFSA code for the College of Law is 001775.

March 15: Preferred application deadline.

Admissions Checklist:

Complete all required sections of the application and submit electronically through LSAC by March 15, 2021;

Attach a résumé submitted electronically through LSAC;

Attach a personal statement (2 pages double-spaced preferred) submitted electronically through LSAC;

Two letters of recommendation (submitted electronically through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service) are required. For applicants who will graduate from their undergraduate institutions within a year of attending law school, it is strongly recommended that at least two of your Letters of Recommendation be academic in nature ( i.e. , from a professor or teaching assistant). You may submit up to 2 additional Letters of Recommendation for a maximum of 4 Letters of Recommendation;

The application fee has been waived for the 2020-2021 academic year.

If you have questions about the application, please email [email protected] .

Contact Information:

31 Washington and Lee University Instructions

To apply for jd admission:.

Important Admission Deadlines

  • An applicant whose admissions file is complete by March 1 will receive a decision no later than March 31. Applicants whose admissions files are not complete until after March 1 cannot be guaranteed a decision by March 31. Applications received after July 1 will not be considered.
  • Application files completed by February 1 will receive full consideration for merit-based scholarships. Application files completed after February 1 will be considered for scholarship assistance to the extent funds remain available.
  • Applicants for federal student loans should file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). For additional information about Financial Aid at our school, please refer to the University's Financial Aid website.

Application Instructions To Apply for Admission to the School of Law:

  • Submit an application with required attachments. No application fee is required. You must comply with the electronic certification instructions when submitting your application through LSAC. Please refer to our website, www.law.wlu.edu/admissions, for guidance on individual elements of our application.
  • Register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Have a reportable LSAT score on record with LSAC, and arrange to have transcripts sent to LSAC from every college or university you have attended.
  • Direct LSAC to send a law school report to Washington and Lee. If you completed any postsecondary work outside the US (including its territories) or Canada, submit transcripts from foreign institutions to be included in your CAS report. This service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration fee; the Transcript Request Form is available online from LSAC. Foreign Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your Credential Assembly Service Law School Report. Note that only work completed outside the U.S. and Canada that exceeds the equivalent of an academic year will be authenticated and evaluated by LSAC's transcript services. When any lesser amount of work is completed, up to and including one academic year, a copy of that transcript will simply be forwarded to the law school. Questions about the Credential Assembly Service should be directed to LSAC at 215.968.1001 or [email protected] .
  • Obtain two letters of recommendation. Because we seek to evaluate your potential as a law student, faculty recommendations that discuss your academic performance are particularly helpful. We encourage you to use the LSAC Letter of Recommendation and Evaluation Service. This service is included in your Credential Assembly Service registration. Submissions made through the LSAC service are included in your law school report. Alternatively, letters of recommendation may be submitted directly to the School of Law. We will accept additional references, but will consider your file complete when two letters have been received.
  • Once your application has been submitted, you must inform the admissions office of any changes in the information provided, or any new event or information that would have been required to be disclosed had it occurred or been known on the date the application was submitted. For details, please refer to the Application. If you intend to apply for federal educational loans, submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The University's Financial Aid Office may request supplemental financial information. Questions regarding educational loans should be directed to the University's Office of Financial Aid at 540.458.8715.
  • All applicants for admission are considered for merit-based scholarship assistance; no separate application form is required.

31 William & Mary Law School Instructions

First-Year Application Procedure

William & Mary has a March 1 application deadline. For priority consideration, please submit your application no later than 5:00 PM (EST) on December 31. Applications should be submitted as early as possible and will be reviewed in the order they become complete. Decisions will be communicated no later than April 1 for first-year applications complete by March 1. Applicants must receive a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution before beginning the J.D. degree program at William & Mary Law School. Please complete the following steps to apply:

The following items are required. You will be notified by email once your application has been received. The email will include instructions on how to check your file status online. Required items should be submitted as soon as possible. Applications that are missing required material will be reviewed later in the cycle and final decisions will be rendered based on the information that exists in the file at that time.

  • JD application (submit electronically through LSAC)
  • $85 non-refundable application processing fee (submit electronically with the application)
  • Personal statement and optional addenda (use attachments to submit electronically with the application)
  • Two recommendation letters (submit through LSAC to be included in the CAS Report)
  • LSAC/CAS Report
  • TOEFL (international applicants only, if applicable)
  • Domicile Form , if you claim Virginia domicile for tuition purposes

The application must be submitted electronically through LSAC. For information on applying, contact LSAC at 215.968.1001 or LSAC.org . It is important to review the application checklist and instructions available through LSAC and on our website at https://law.wm.edu/admissions/index.php .

Application Fee: The application processing fee is $85. The non-refundable payment must be submitted electronically directly to LSAC with the application.

Personal Statement: You will be required to submit a personal statement as an attachment. The statement is your opportunity to introduce yourself to the admissions committee and should include why the JD degree is essential to your future.

Optional Essays: You are invited to supplement your personal statement with either or both of the following optional essays. These topics are helpful in forming a full picture of our applicants, so we encourage you to provide any relevant information either in your personal statement or in the optional essays (though, of course, it is not necessary to duplicate information in both places).

Optional Essay 1: You may submit an essay providing additional information about why you have chosen to apply to law school in general and William & Mary Law School in particular. We are interested in the factors that have prompted your interest in a legal career and the ways in which you think William & Mary can further that interest.

Optional Essay 2: William & Mary Law School’s admission process is guided by the view that a student body that reflects the broad diversity of society contributes to the implementation of Law School’s mission, improves the learning process, and enriches the educational experience for all students. In reviewing applications, the Law School considers, as one factor among many, how an applicant may contribute to the diversity of the Law School based on the candidate’s experiences, achievements, background, and perspectives. This approach ensures the best and most relevant possible legal training and serves the legal profession by training lawyers to effectively serve an increasingly diverse society. You are invited to submit an essay that describes your particular life experiences with an emphasis on how the perspectives that you have acquired would contribute to the William & Mary Law School’s intellectual community and enhance the diversity of the student body. Examples of topics include (but are not limited to): an experience of prejudice, bias, economic disadvantage, personal adversity, or other social hardship (perhaps stemming from one’s religious affiliation, disability, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity); experience as a first-generation college student; significant employment history (such as in business, military or law enforcement, or public service); experience as an immigrant or refugee; graduate study; or impressive leadership achievement (including college or community service).

Resume : Please include your significant work experience, educational history, college and community activities, honors and awards you have received, and any prior W&M affiliation. Include dates for all items listed on your resume. Please provide complete information; there is no required length and your resume may exceed one page.

Recommendation Letters and Evaluations: You must submit two required recommendation letters through LSAC. The LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service is included in your CAS registration and will accept generic and school specific letters. Professors who have personal knowledge of your academic performance and potential should write your letters of recommendation. If you have been out of school for three years or more, you may substitute letters from employers or others who are well acquainted with your personal traits and intellectual potential.

LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Registration: Register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) and arrange to have undergraduate and graduate transcripts sent to LSAC from all colleges and universities attended by March 1. Applicants must have a reportable LSAT score on record with LSAC. LSAT scores since June 2015 are valid. Registration information may be obtained at LSAC.org or by calling 215.968.1001. The LSAC law school code for William & Mary is 5115.

Law School Admission Test

All applicants should take the LSAT no later than January 2021. William & Mary Law School considers the LSAT score in the context of the entire application (transcripts, personal statement, letters of recommendation, evidence of leadership and engagement, and other information). If you feel that one or more of your test scores does not accurately reflect your ability or potential, please use the Miscellaneous Addendum attachment to explain this disparity. Contact LSAC to request information about the LSAT at 215.968.1001 or LSAC.org .

All applicants must register with LSAC's Credential Assembly Service (CAS). CAS information is available online at LSAC.org . Transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work must be submitted directly to the CAS.

Foreign Transcripts

William & Mary Law School requires that foreign transcripts be submitted through the CAS if you received your degree from an institution outside the U.S. or Canada, or if you completed the equivalent of more than one year of undergraduate study outside the U.S. (including its territories) or Canada. This service is included in the CAS registration fee. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your LSAC CAS report. Log in to your online account and follow the instructions for registering for the service. Be sure to print out a Transcript Request Form for each institution and send it promptly to them. Additional time is usually required to receive foreign transcripts, so please plan accordingly. Questions about foreign transcripts can be directed to LSAC at 215.968.1001 or [email protected].

TOEFL: If your first language is not English and English is not the language of instruction at your undergraduate institution, you may submit a score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

If you attended another law school, you must include an addendum to explain why you did not complete the program as well as a letter from your law school indicating your dates of attendance, reason for withdrawal, and academic standing.

Application for Virginia In-State Tuition Privileges

Applicants claiming entitlement to Virginia in-state educational privileges must complete the Application for Virginia In-State Tuition Privileges.

  • Download the Domicile Form .
  • After completing the Domicile Form, attach it to your application. If you need to supply additional information, please attach additional documents to the application.
  • Alternatively, you may send the completed domicile application and supporting documents via email to [email protected], via fax to 757.221.2151, or mail to:

Office of the University Registrar William & Mary PO Box 8795 Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795

Applicants who are active duty military personnel or honorably discharged veterans are eligible for in-state tuition privileges once they have moved to Virginia. Upon moving here, applicants should submit the Domicile Form and their military orders showing permanent duty station (active duty) or their discharge papers (veterans) to the Domicile Office at [email protected].

Application for Need-based Financial Aid

Applicants seeking need-based scholarships and/or educational loans must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov . The recommended deadline is February 15. The Financial Aid Office will process FAFSA data following transmittal to William & Mary. The FAFSA Title IV code for William & Mary is 003705. All admitted applicants are automatically considered for merit scholarships awarded by the Law School based on the information submitted to complete the application for admission. No additional information is required.

Note: Law School Scholarships cannot exceed total cost of tuition and fees. If you receive military funding or external scholarships in excess of yearly total cost of attendance, your scholarship will be reduced accordingly. Additionally, Law School Scholarships awarded to non-Virginia residents will be prorated if the student applies for and ultimately receives Virginia in-state educational privileges.

Character & Fitness

Earning a law degree does not guarantee you the right to practice law. Becoming licensed to practice requires you to meet the character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar of the state in which you intend to practice. We encourage you to determine what those specific requirements are in each state where you intend to apply for a license. A good resource to begin with is The Comprehensive Guide to Bar Admission Requirements, published annually and available at www.ncbex.org .

Most states will either request a copy of your law school application directly from the law school or require you to provide a copy as part of your application to sit for the state bar examination. Accordingly, it is very important that you disclose ALL information that may, in any way, reflect on your character and fitness to practice law, including but not limited to, disciplinary and criminal proceedings. You must disclose each instance even though the charges may have been dismissed or reduced, you were acquitted, adjudication was withheld, a conviction was reversed, set aside, or vacated. YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO DISCLOSE ANY EXPUNGED OR SEALED RECORDS. You must disclose both the original charge or citation and the ultimate disposition, including any reduced charges or lesser included offenses. If you have any question as to whether a given incident should be disclosed, you should opt for full disclosure. NOTE: By applying to William & Mary Law School you consent to being subjected to a criminal background check; applicants for admission to the law school will be subjected to criminal background checks prior to being permitted to matriculate at the law school.

If you fail to fully disclose information in this application, the subsequent background check conducted by the state board of law examiners will reveal the discrepancy between your actual record and your law school application. This discrepancy will cause concern for the character and fitness committee of the state bar as they evaluate your character and fitness to practice law. The failure to fully, completely, and candidly answer all questions, therefore, may result in the rejection of your application to law school, expulsion from law school if admitted, or denial of admission to a state bar.

Your duty to disclose continues after you file this application and up through your graduation. This CONTINUING DUTY means you must TIMELY disclose matters that arise which would have required you to answer “yes” to one or more of the following questions. To make a timely disclosure after you file this application and before you enroll in law school, contact the Dean of Admissions. Once enrolled, contact the office of the Registrar to make such a disclosure.

NOTE CAREFULLY: You must disclose all matters requested on this law school application UNLESS THE MATTER WAS EXPUNGED OR SEALED, even if you have been advised otherwise by anyone else, including legal counsel. Your disclosure requirements include, but are not limited to, everything that appears on your official record. That means you must disclose matters even when an arrest did not lead to a charge, a charge was reduced or dismissed, you were acquitted or found not guilty, adjudication was withheld, deferred, or diverted, or a conviction was reversed, set aside, or vacated. Full disclosure means that you must avoid answers and supplemental reports that are vague, superficial, misleading, evasive, or only partly true.

Unless otherwise constrained by law, William & Mary is committed to providing an environment for its students that is free from discrimination based on any personal factor unrelated to qualifications or performance such as race or color, citizenship, national origin or ethnicity, ancestry, religion or creed, political affiliation or belief, age, sex or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, marital status, pregnancy status, parental status, height, weight, military service, veteran status, caretaker status, or family medical or genetic information. (Full non-discrimination notice available online at http://www.wm.edu/policies/eoaa .)

37 Brigham Young University Instructions

POLICY STATEMENTS

Brigham Young University – J. Reuben Clark Law School (“BYU Law”) accepts J.D. applications on a rolling basis. Applications for Fall 2021 will be accepted as early as September 7, 2020 . Highly qualified early applicants could receive a decision by November 2020. BYU’s priority deadline for J.D. applications is March 1, 2021 . The deadline to be considered for the Clark Scholarship Program is December 28, 2021 . Applications received by the priority deadline will receive priority consideration for scholarship assistance. Please note that (1) because of our practice of rolling admissions, most offers will have already been extended by the priority deadline and (2) an invitation to be on our waitlist is a “decision” for purposes of those who meet the priority deadline. Applications received after June 30, 2021 will only be reviewed in exceptional circumstances.

Application Fee – There is no application fee for students applying for Fall 2021

BYU Electronic Application – Complete through your LSAC Account

Personal Statement – No more than two (2) pages , double-spaced with conventional margins and font size

Resume – No more than one (1) page with conventional formatting and font size

Two (2) letters of recommendation – Letters from professors who can speak to a candidate's academic abilities are preferred, other professional references are acceptable from non-traditional candidates

Addenda – Candidates must provide an addendum of no more than one (1) page explaining any character and fitness issues as defined in the application. Candidates may also provide an additional one (1) page addendum addressing other gaps or weaknesses in the application.

Ecclesiastical Endorsement (EE) – Applicants must obtain an EE before their applications are considered complete. An EE is obtained by interviewing with two different religious leaders. To start this process go to endorse.byu.edu. This process verifies that candidates understand the BYU Honor Code and have committed to abide by it during law school. * *Please note: all admitted students will be required to complete a new EE prior to enrollment each subsequent year of law school .

LDS candidates must obtain an EE from:

  • Your current Bishop; AND
  • Your current Stake President

Non-LDS candidates must obtain an EE from

  • A clergy member of your own faith OR the LDS Bishop over the area where you live; AND
  • The nondenominational BYU Chaplain

For further information regarding EEs for non-LDS candidates please visit: https://policy.byu.edu/view/index.php?p=26&s=s315

  • Feel free to contact Law Admissions at (801) 422-7871, if you have questions about obtaining an EE.

Admissions Process

All applications are read in their entirety during an initial screening; select applicants will be invited to interview with the Dean of Admissions. Additional information will be provided to students invited to interview. After the interview, an applicant can expect to receive a decision in 2-4 weeks. Students not invited to interview, but invited to the waitlist, may be selected for an interview at a later time.

Communication

Candidates are responsible to provide a current telephone number, email, and permanent physical address. As all communication with a candidate will occur through one of these channels, candidates must keep this information updated to receive timely information concerning their application.

BYU Law does not require a separate scholarship application. All candidates are considered for general merit scholarships (up to full tuition for three years) after the prioity deadline. In addition to general merit scholarships, BYU Law offers a number of full scholarships plus cash stipends to a few exceptionally qualified students. Competition for these scholarships will be by invitation only to candidates with high academic credentials and test scores who complete their application by December 28, 2020.

Letters of Recommendation and Transcripts

Letters of recommendation and all transcripts (including those from undergraduate institutions outside the United States) must be sent to the Law School Admissions Council’s Credential Assembly Service (LSAC’s CAS) and should not be sent directly to BYU Law.

Non-discrimination

The J. Reuben Clark Law School provides equal opportunity in legal education for all persons, including faculty and employees with respect to hiring, continuation, promotion, and continuing faculty status, applicants for admission, enrolled students, and graduates, without discrimination or segregation on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, national origin, sex, gender (including identity and expression), sexual orientation, age, or disability. The Law School provides equal opportunity regardless of status in these categories. Notwithstanding the above, consistent with the Law School's religious affiliation and purpose, the University and the Law School regulate conduct that is inconsistent with essential elements of the religious values and beliefs of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Any law student who feels that he or she has been subject to discrimination prohibited by the above policy should contact Assistant Dean Bryan Hamblin, 338 JRCB, or may contact the University Equal Employment Office, A-285 ASB.

38 Indiana University - Bloomington Instructions

Please read the following instructions carefully. The application must be completed in its entirety and electronically transmitted via LSAC. Please keep a copy of your application for your records. Applications of non-matriculating students are retained for three years from the date of intended enrollment.

A fee of $50 is required of all domestic applicants and $85 for all international applicants. Applications cannot be processed until this fee is received. An international applicant is defined by their citizenship. Please contact the Office of International Services with questions about citizenship at http://ois.iu.edu/about/contact.shtml.

Credential Assembly Service (CAS) and Standardized Test Scores

All applicants must register with LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Other than GRE scores, all supporting application materials, including transcript(s), letters of recommendation, and LSAT scores must be sent directly to CAS and not the Law School. Applicants who plan to use GRE scores should log in to their ETS account and select the Indiana University Maurer School of Law as a recipient of GRE results using the ETS IU code: 4703.

Please submit 2 letters of recommendation to the CAS that attest to your potential success as a law student and as a member of the legal profession. Additional letters of recommendation will not be accepted. While preference is given to letters from faculty members who are familiar with your academic strengths, we gladly welcome letters from employers or individuals who know you professionally. Recommendations must be sent through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service.

Please submit a 2-3 page personal statement that provides insight about you, describes your motivation to attend law school, and/or highlights your interest in Indiana University Maurer School of Law. A compelling statement will be clearly written, well-organized, and highlights the special strengths and experiences that you would bring to our law school and the legal profession. These may include, but are not limited to, demonstrated evidence of leadership, creativity, commitment to justice, service to others, cross-cultural competency, and significant work or volunteer experience. The personal statement must be a maximum of 3 pages, double-spaced, using 12-pt font with 1-inch margins.

Please submit a current resume which outlines your professional and volunteer experience, academic accomplishments, and other pertinent aspects of your background you wish to share with the admissions committee.

Addendum (Optional)

If you believe that the admissions committee would benefit from an explanation about part of your application, you should submit an addendum. Addenda will usually explain problems with, or unusual aspects to, your application. Typical reasons for submitting an addendum include, but are not limited to, the following: a poor semester of grades, an unusually low grade on a particular course, an unusual gap in college attendance, or an LSAT or GPA that isn’t indicative of your true abilities. You may also submit an addendum describing any significant adversity you have experienced which may have limited your educational opportunities or negatively impacted your academic performance.

Please note that if you answered 'Yes' to any question under the Character and Fitness section of this application, you must submit an addendum to explain each incident.

International Applicant Language Tests

If your first language is not English you must include results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with your application materials. TOEFL scores and IELTS scores are valid for two (2) years.

The admission committee recognizes that in certain circumstances an advanced standing applicant may have English language fluency that is sufficient for success in the JD program at Indiana Law. In such cases, the applicant may request a TOEFL or IELTS test waiver from the admissions committee by emailing [email protected]. Please explain why you believe you have the English proficiency to request a TOEFL or IELTS test waiver.

The deadline for submission of the application form is July 15. International applicants should submit the application by June 1. We do encourage you to apply as early as possible after August 1st. Admission decisions are made on a rolling basis and could be made as early as the beginning of December. It is your responsibility to make sure that all materials that are needed to complete your file are received by our office. You may check the status of your application online by following the instructions in the email confirming that your application has been received.

Early Commitment

JD applicants may ask to be considered for admission as a part of the Early Commitment Program. This program is designed for those high-caliber applicants who have a strong level of interest in the Indiana University Maurer School of Law. Details regarding this program may be obtained on the law school's website (http://www.law.indiana.edu/admission/jd-apply/questions-and-answers.shtml#early) or by contacting the Office of Admissions. Early Commitment Applications must be completed no later than October 15th; decisions will be made by November 1st. Competitive applicants not admitted as part of our early commitment will be considered for general admission.

Scholarship Assistance

No separate application is necessary for scholarship consideration. Scholarship assistance is made possible by the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and by the generous support of alumni and friends of the school. Awards vary in amounts and are primarily based upon merit. In recent years, awards have been made to more than 75 percent of each entering class and have ranged from $5,000 to full tuition. Most scholarships will be renewed each academic year as long as you maintain satisfactory academic progress (good standing of a 2.30). A small group of scholarships have additional renewal criteria. All admitted applicants are considered for scholarships, but priority may be given to those who have completed their admissions application by March 1.

Loan Programs

If you need information regarding loan programs, you should contact the Director of Financial Aid at Indiana University Maurer School of Law (812.855.7746 or [email protected] ).

The form used to apply for federal student financial aid is called the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. For the academic year, you will be using your prior year's income and asset information to complete the FAFSA. It's best to complete your federal tax return early to have the data available, but you can file the FAFSA before you actually file your taxes. You may complete the FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov . For additional help in completing the FAFSA, please go to www.studentaid.ed.gov , or call 1.800.4.FED.AID (1.800.433.3243). Be sure to make a copy of the FAFSA for your own records. The Federal School Code for Indiana University Bloomington is 001809.

You may file the FAFSA any time after October 1. The ideal time to file the FAFSA is prior to March 1st.

*International applicants, in most cases, if you apply for a Private Education Loan to attend school in the U.S., you will need to obtain a cosigner who is a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident in order for your loan application to be approved.

Nondiscrimination Policy

The Indiana University Maurer School of Law, in accordance with applicable state and federal laws and campus policies, does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender (including identity and expression), disability, age, citizenship, status as a veteran, or other legally protected class, and it prohibits sexual harassment in its programs and activities. Inquiries about Indiana Law’s student-related policies or the Law School’s compliance with state and federal laws and campus regulations relating to nondiscrimination may be directed to the Office of Student Services, Indiana University Maurer School of Law, 211 S Indiana Ave, IN 47405, or to the Office of Civil Rights, US Department of Education, Citigroup Center, 50 W Madison St., Suite 1475, Chicago, IL 60661-4544.

Get to Know Indiana Law

Find ways to experience Indiana Law by visiting http://www.law.indiana.edu/visit.

Please feel free to contact the Office of Admissions if you have any questions or concerns. We would be glad to help!

Email: [email protected] Phone: 812.855.4765

Greg Canada, Assistant Dean for Admissions

Janet L. Hein, Director of Admissions

Amanda Gallaga, Director of Admissions Operations

Kendra Abercrombie, Assistant Director of Admissions

38 Ohio State University Instructions

Applying for Admission for the Juris Doctor Degree

Please use standard writing when completing the application. That means do NOT use ALL CAPS or all lower case when completing the application (PARTICULARLY WHEN COMPLETING ADDRESSES). Applications for admission to the College of Law should be submitted anytime between September 15 and July 1 (with a preferred deadline of March 31) of the calendar year prior to the planned date of enrollment; however applications submitted after the preferential deadline of March 31 will be accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis until the office determines applications will no longer be accepted. Regular admission decisions are completed on a rolling basis [though binding early decision will be made by December 21]. While all applicants will be considered for financial assistance if they are granted admission, we encourage you to complete the FAFSA. Accordingly, students should, to the extent possible, submit their applications in advance of the March 31 deadline.

Applicants to the College of Law are required to apply electronically through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) at LSAC.org .

Requirements for Admission as a First-Year Student

All applicants for admission must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university prior to enrollment in the College of Law. This requirement may be waived only if the applicant has been an active participant in The Ohio State University's Pathway to Law (3+3 Program) or in exceptional circumstances and upon approval by the Admissions Committee. There is no single major or undergraduate field of study required of an applicant.

Applicants must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS).

Prior to consideration of their application, the student will enter into an Early Decision Agreement in which the student commits to attending the Moritz College of Law if admitted, agrees to withdraw pending applications to any other law school, and further agrees not to initiate additional applications to other law schools.

Applicants to The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law frequently indicate that Ohio State is their first choice for a legal education. For those students who have carefully researched their law school opportunities, the Early Decision Option provides an expeditious evaluation and decision by the Admissions Committee. This early notification has the advantage of enabling successful early decision applicants to pursue their educational, professional and familial engagements and responsibilities free of the time, expense and anxiety associated with the typical law school application process. Successful Early Decision applicants will be notified of scholarship awards prior to the deposit deadline. Thus, the applicant should be in a position to commit to attending Ohio State even though they will not have a complete financial aid package at the time of their deposit. It is important to recognize that the benefits associated with admission under the Early Decision Option are accompanied by a reduction in law school choice. Ohio State reserves the right to provide other law schools with the names of applicants accepted under our Early Decision Option.

Applicants wishing to be considered as a candidate for the Early Decision Option must:

  • Submit an Early Decision Agreement and an application for admission no later than November 20, 2020 (application does not have to be complete before submission)
  • Early Decision applications must be complete (all requirements fulfilled) no later than November 30, 2020. The application is considered complete when all required application materials, including a CAS report, have been received by the Office of Admissions.
  • We will accept the November LSAT for Early Decision Applicants. All other materials must be submitted by the deadlines.
  • Candidates must agree that if admitted to Ohio State under the Early Decision Option, they will withdraw their applications from all other law schools
  • Candidates may not initiate any additional law school applications once notified of their Ohio State offer of Early Decision admission
  • Candidates admitted under the Early Decision Option will not be eligible for deferral unless exceptional circumstances are demonstrated

Early Decision applicants may be admitted, denied, or held for consideration through the regular rolling admissions process. Applicants who meet the requirements for Early Decision consideration will be notified by December 21, 2020. The seat deposit deadline for applicants admitted under the Early Decision Option is February 1, 2021. Applicants who have not been admitted under the Early Decision process are not bound by this Early Decision Agreement.

Application Requirements

A completed electronic application will include the following:

  • The application for admission and $60 application fee ($70 for international applicants)
  • Completed character and fitness section
  • Resume (we encourage more than one page but a maximum of three pages)
  • Personal statement (generally 2-3 pages, double spaced, 10pt. font)
  • Optional - Essays on leadership potential/experience; contributions to a diverse intellectual environment/multicultural experiences, commitment to public interest/public service

The following items must be submitted in addition to the completed application via CAS:

  • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended
  • Two letters of recommendation (faculty letters of recommendation are preferred for those students that are currently in school or have graduated within the past year)

The Moritz College of Law is committed to enrolling highly motivated individuals with strong academic potential who bring to the College a broad range of personal backgrounds and intellectual experiences. All candidates offered admission should demonstrate likely academic and professional success based upon quantifiable and non-quantifiable indicia. In selecting members of each entering class, the College seeks to enroll men and women who will enhance the intellectual quality of life within the Moritz Community who bring to the college those skills and attributes such as, but not limited to, creativity and innovation; problem solving; practical judgment; empathy; diligence; integrity; honesty; networking and business development; passion and engagement; community involvement and service; strategic planning; and multi-cultural experience/competency that are essential to success in the legal profession.

Valuing Diversity and Inclusion

The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law believes that diversity, inclusion, equity, and justice are essential to the excellence of our community, culture, and curriculum. We recognize that the pursuit of this excellence requires thoughtful, deliberate, and sustained action and that this effort is critical to our educational mission.

Community: We value diversity in all of its dimensions including, but not limited to, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, religion, ideology, sexual orientation, physical and learning abilities and socioeconomic status. We seek to reflect these multiple perspectives, backgrounds, and interests in all facets of our community. We recognize that students who are exposed to and embrace diversity are better prepared to engage in a pluralistic world and successfully navigate the legal profession.

Culture: We strive to be an inclusive community in which each individual feels safe, respected, and valued. In building a community that values similarities and differences among its constituents, we seek to embody in our actions and in our relations with one another principles of equity and justice as well as the values of honesty, respect, compassion, responsibility, and fairness.

Curriculum: We believe that exposure to multiple, and even sometimes competing points of view best equips students to explore, understand, and apply complex concepts, building the basis for a rigorous legal education. By weaving diversity into the fabric of our curriculum, we equip our students with the interpersonal and critical thinking skills that are essential to success in the complex, multicultural world in which we live and the society the legal profession serves.

The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law is committed to building and supporting a diverse community. The university embraces human diversity and is committed to equal employment opportunity, valuing diversity in admissions, and eliminating discrimination. This commitment is both a moral imperative consistent with an intellectual community that celebrates individual differences and diversity, as well as a matter of law. Discrimination against any individual based upon protected status, which is defined as age, ancestry, color, disability, gender identity or expression, genetic information, HIV/AIDs status, military status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status, is prohibited.

For further information, contact the office of human resources at 124 Archer House, 2130 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43210-1174, (614) 292-4164 or visit http://hr.osu.edu/policy.

Application Status

Staff members of the Moritz College of Law Office of Admissions and Financial Aid are available to answer questions relating to the application process and admission standards. Due to the high volume of requests, applicants are strongly encouraged to check the status of their application by referring to the Applicant Status Online Page at http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/admissions/jd/applying/check-your-status/.

The Office of Admissions will notify applicants by e-mail when their application has been received and processed. The email will include log in information for the online status page. It is important that the applicant provides the office with a current e-mail address and checks their e-mail regularly. While the Office of Admissions seeks to keep applicants informed of their status, it is the applicant's responsibility to make sure the application is received by the relevant deadline.

The Moritz College of Law Admissions Committee renders admissions decisions on a rolling basis after the application file is received and is complete (with supporting documents, such as the CAS report). Early decision applicants will receive a decision by December 21. Applicants will be notified of their decision via e-mail and decisions will be posted on the online status page. We will not provide decisions over the phone. We will only release information to applicants unless an applicant has indicated in writing a specific individual who may inquire information on their behalf.

Contact with the Moritz College of Law Office of Admissions may be made by phone at (614) 292-8810 or e-mail at [email protected] . The Office of Admissions is staffed Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET.

Moritz College of Law welcomes applications from citizens of other countries. International applicants, or those with DACA status should follow the application procedures established for U.S. citizens.

The Moritz College of Law requires that foreign transcripts be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS). For any post-secondary work outside the United States (including its territories) or Canada, an applicant must use this service for the evaluation of foreign transcripts (exception if the foreign work was completed through a study abroad or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, and the work is indicated as such on the home campus transcript).

This service is included in the CAS registration fee. A Foreign Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into the CAS Law School Report.

Applicants whose first language is not English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and earn a minimum score of 600 on the paper-based test, 250 on the computer-based test or 100 on the internet-based test; or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) and score at least 7.0. The test must have been taken within the last two years. Non-native English speakers who have been awarded a baccalaureate or graduate degree from a university in Australia, Belize, the British Caribbean or British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Scotland, the United States, or Wales, are exempted from the TOEFL requirement. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, For the Fall 2021 applicant cycle, The Ohio State University will accept Duolingo scores of 115 or more along with an interview by someone at the law school to prove English proficiency.

You must contact the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be sent to LSAC. LSAC's TOEFL code for the Credential Assembly Service is 0058. Your score will be included in the Foreign Credential Evaluation document that will be included in your law school report. Our office will forward your TOEFL score to the Graduate and Professional Admissions Office to satisfy the requirement at the university level.

To use CAS, login to your online account and follow the instructions for registering for the service. Be sure to print out a Transcript Request Form for each institution and send it promptly to them. More time is usually required to receive foreign transcripts. Questions about the Credential Assembly Service should be directed to LSAC at (215) 968-1001.

Any non-U.S. citizen seeking admission to the College of Law should be aware of the financial resources required to attend the College of Law for three years. The expected annual cost of law school and living expenses is approximately $71,000 for non-U.S. citizens. Should admission be offered, the admitted candidate must provide documentation that sufficient funds exist to meet the cost of attendance.

An international applicant who does not wish to obtain a Juris Doctor from Ohio State, but who has undertaken previous legal education in another country, may apply to the graduate degree (LL.M.) program for non-U.S. citizens. Information about the LL.M. program may be found at http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/programs/llm/index.php.

Application for Admission as a Transfer Student

We consider a range of factors in the admissions process, including academic achievement, evidence of a student’s ability to contribute positively to the profession and impact the intellectual life of the college.

In assessing an applicant's potential for success, primary consideration is given to an applicant's academic performance during his or her first year. We also consider undergraduate transcripts and LSAT scores. Consideration is given to letters of recommendation, especially those from a 1L professor, and extracurricular activities, leadership abilities, multicultural experiences, public service activities, work experience, life experience, and contributions to diversity, inclusion, and equity.

Applications for admission as a transfer student are available electronically at LSAC.org .

In order for the Moritz College of Law to fully consider the application of a student desiring transfer into the 2L class, the applicant must have completed one year of study at a school accredited by the American Bar Association. The Moritz College of Law will accept up to, but not exceeding, 30 semester-hours of transfer credit.

Application decisions are made on a rolling basis. As a general rule, final decisions concerning transfer applicants are made in mid-June through early-August.

A transfer student may enroll any term in which the courses scheduled provide the student with a viable academic program. In all cases where admission is granted, the law school work that has been completed will be evaluated for transfer of credit in light of the curricular offerings of the Moritz College of Law.

A transfer applicant is responsible for making certain that the items below are on file with the Moritz Admissions Office prior to the desired term of enrollment (Applications are accepted May 1 through July 1):

  • The completed application and application fee of $60 (submitted electronically through LSAC)
  • Official transcripts of all work completed at all undergraduate and graduate institutions attended and the law school attended
  • An updated CAS report issued from the Law School Admission Council
  • An official letter from the law school attended certifying good standing and class rank
  • A letter of recommendation from a law professor who has taught the applicant in class
  • A resume including honors, awards, activities, and work experience
  • A brief statement (one page or less) giving the reason for transfer to the Moritz College of Law

Admission into the Moritz College of Law as a transfer student is selective and based upon the applicant's academic record at the law school from which the transfer is requested, as well as the applicant's prelaw qualifications under the admission standards for Moritz. Final decisions concerning transfer applicants for the beginning of the academic year are made beginning in late May and will continue through early August.

Application for Admission as a Visiting/Transient Student

The Moritz College of Law permits students to enroll as visiting or transient students. Visiting students typically have completed the first two years of law classes at another ABA-approved law school.

Prospective visiting students must complete the following to be considered for admission:

  • The completed electronic application via LSAC (to be submitted at least 30 days prior to desired date of enrollment) and $60 application fee
  • A letter from the Dean of the law school the applicant is currently attending authorizing the student to enroll at the Moritz College of Law and that all classes taken at Moritz will transfer to the current institution
  • A statement explaining the reason(s) for wishing to attend as a visiting student
  • An official law school transcript

Visiting students are admitted to the Moritz College of Law for one semester only. Students who wish to attend for a second semester must receive permission to do so from the Associate Dean for Admissions.

Financial Aid Opportunities and Application

The decision to attend law school is, in part, a decision to invest in one’s future. As with any investment, we advise that you seek financial guidance and make informed decision about debt load. The Moritz College of Law’s financial aid philosophy reflects the desire to provide meaningful financial assistance to a broad range of students including through who are likely to excel in their legal studies, who have a record of community/public service, who will contribute to the diversity of the student body, who have demonstrated potential for leadership, or have a significant financial need.

In order to qualify for need-based aid from the Moritz College of Law and Federal Stafford Loans, a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) should be completed at the earliest possible date after the FAFSA becomes available in October. The FAFSA form may be completed online at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov . The Ohio State federal code is 003090. Questions regarding the FAFSA should be directed to the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-433-2343.

For full information on financial aid, including information regarding scholarships, need-based aid, and loan assistance, please refer to the Moritz College of Law financial aid website at http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/admissions/jd/scholarships-financial-aid/.

Retention of Records, Reapplication, and Deferral Requests

The application and supporting documents become the property of The Ohio State University and may not be returned to the applicant, nor forwarded to another institution. All application material is retained for one year.

An applicant who wishes to apply to the next year's class may do so after submitting a new application fee and new application form. Letters of recommendation and the personal statement may be carried over to the new application year, though the applicant is required to provide the admission committee with a summary of new and/or significant developments since the time the first application was submitted; including but not limited to an updated resume and character and fitness addendum.

Admission applicants who wish to delay enrollment into the College of Law may request a deferral of admission. Such requests must be in writing (e-mail is acceptable) and should outline the reason(s) for the request. Deferral requests are reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the admission committee. An applicant who is granted a deferral will be asked to submit their seat deposit to secure their seat for the following year. In the fall deferred students will be contacted to confirm enrollment and provide updated information.

Office of Disability Services

Applicants with documented disabilities who may require accommodations and services are encouraged to contact the Office for Disability Services (ODS). ODS offers a variety of services and accommodations for students with documented disabilities, including learning disabilities, hearing or visual impairments, mobility impairments, attention deficit disorders (ADD/ADHD), or psychiatric or medical disabilities. Academic accommodations, auxiliary aids, and support services are individualized and based on disability documentation, functional limitations, and a collaborative assessment of needs. As ODS is the designated campus office to determine appropriate accommodations and auxiliary aids for students with disabilities, documentation of the disability for eligibility determination should be submitted to ODS as early as possible in the admission process.

If you want more information about academic accommodations and services for students with disabilities, contact ODS at (614) 292-3307 (V/T), (614)0292-0901 (TDD), fax (614) 292-4190 or visit http://ods.osu.edu .

38 University of California—Davis Instructions

  • Application submission must be electronic, unless a physical or other disability precludes your ability to do so. Application submission must be completed no later than midnight, March 15, 2021, Pacific Daylight Time. LSAC has been instructed not to transmit applications submitted after the midnight deadline. There is no application fee.
  • Before completing the application, read the checklist information below. Additional instructions are available at the law school website. Please note that UC Davis School of Law requires applicants to supply their Social Security number. The substitute "999" numbers supplied by the LSAC will not be accepted in lieu of applicant's actual Social Security number.
  • The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is required and due March 2, 2021 for need-based aid and federal loans. This deadline applies to all applicants and must be met even if you have not yet received your admission decision.
  • E-mail will be the primary means of communication for both the admission and financial aid offices. Applicants must provide an e-mail address for this purpose. It is advised not to use hotmail accounts as your primary email address as we have experienced difficulties with applicants receiving email from the university to hotmail addresses.
  • Monitor the progress of your application and check for your decision via the status check website. Decisions will be additionally sent through email and/or U.S. postal mail.
  • International applicants should read carefully the additional requirements regarding the TOEFL and the Credential Assembly Service's International Credential Evaluation.
  • NOTE: Students who have been disqualified at another law school are ineligible for admission to UC Davis School of Law. Applications from formerly disqualified law students will not be reviewed.
  • LSAT scores earned prior to October 2015, and scores earned after March 2021 by first-time test takers, are not valid for Fall 2021 admission.
  • Applications with a valid LSAT score on file will be considered complete and will advance to review. If you plan to take the LSAT again and want review of your application to be held until your future score is received, you must notify the Admission Office via email ( [email protected] ) to hold your application until your additional LSAT score is received.

In accordance with the Federal Privacy Act of 1974, you are hereby notified that disclosure of your Social Security number is mandatory. This record-keeping system was established prior to January 1, 1975, pursuant to (1) the authority of The Regents of the University of California under Article IX, Section 9, of the California Constitution and (2) the Undergraduate Admission System Reference Manual, Information System Division, Office of the Vice President-Business and Finance, University of California, January 5, 1972, p. 1—5. The principal uses of the number shall be to (1) verify your identity in the Law School Admissions record system and (2) tie in with the integrated Student Information System.

The University of California, Davis, School of Law does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy (including pregnancy, childbirth, and medical conditions related to pregnancy or childbirth), physical or mental disability, age, medical condition (cancer related or genetic characteristics), ancestry, marital status, citizenship, sexual orientation, or service in the uniformed services (includes membership, application for membership, performance of service, application for service, or obligation for service in the uniformed services), status as a Vietnam-era veteran or special disabled veteran, in accordance with all applicable state and federal laws, and with University policy. As required by Title IX, the University of California, Davis, School of Law does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs, admissions, employment, or other activities.The University's student-related nondiscrimination policy can be found in its entirety here: https://law.ucdavis.edu/jd/consumer-information.html.

In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Neither admission to, nor degree conferral from, UC Davis School of Law guarantee that you will meet these requirements for admission to any state bar. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction or by visiting the Conference of Bar Examiners at www.ncbex.org .

EARLY BINDING DECISION OPTION

Applicants who have decided that UC Davis is their first-choice law school may apply using our Early Binding Decision option. The deadline to apply for Early Decision is November 1, 2020, midnight Pacific Standard Time. By choosing this option, an applicant commits to enrolling at UC Davis and agrees to withdraw all other applications upon admission. All Early Decision applicants will receive a decision by November 30, 2020.

APPLICATION CHECKLIST

The required application materials are:

Application for Admission.

Score(s) from one of the following two entrance exams:

  • Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score for test taken between October 2015 and March 2021. -- or--
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score for test taken between October 2015 and March 2021. The GRE Designated Institution (DI) Code for UC Davis Law School is 4185 .

LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Law School Report.

Personal Statement — Not to exceed four pages, double-spaced. Any optional additional addenda the applicant wishes to provide should be included in the four-page limit; required addenda are not included in the four-page maximum.

Two Letters of Recommendation.

Fall transcript of grades. A fall transcript is preferred for evaluation although not required unless specifically requested by the Admission Office. Fall transcripts should be submitted to LSAC for electronic transmission to the Admission Office.

Resume - Not to exceed two pages.

Credential Assembly Service's International Credential Evaluation (authentication and evaluation of international transcripts). Any applicant whose first degree was earned at a university outside the U.S. (including its territories) or Canada must register with the Credential Assembly Service in order to provide the required credential evaluation report.

TOEFL scores are required of international applicants. Waiver of this requirement may be requested if the applicant's undergraduate language of instruction was English. TOEFL scores should be submitted to LSAC (code 8395) as part of the Credential Assembly Service report. LSAC will transmit the score to the Admission Office.

ADDITIONAL IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

  • NOTE: Be sure to complete each section of the application. Applications will be considered incomplete until all required information has been provided.
  • Please do not submit hard-copy documents unless requested.
  • The admission decision-making process begins as early as November and continues through as late as May.

FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION:

  • The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is REQUIRED for need-based aid and federal loans.
  • March 2, 2021 , is the priority deadline and must be met by all applicants even if you have not yet received your admission decision .
  • Late submission may preclude an applicant from consideration for the maximum amount of gift aid.
  • In addition to the FAFSA, the financial aid office may request supplemental information or forms prior to the commencement of courses.
  • For detailed information on how to apply for aid, please visit our website ( https://law.ucdavis.edu/financial-aid/prospective/applying-for-aid.html) .

SCHOLARSHIPS:

  • Scholarship consideration takes place during the initial evaluation of the application for admission. All applicants are automatically considered for merit aid based on information supplied in their application. Aid awards are sent separate from the admission decision.
  • A few scholarships have donor-specific criteria that may be addressed in the personal statement if applicable: personal experience in the foster care system (as a recipient of services, not as an employee or volunteer); family farm or other agriculture background (immediate family only); academic background in mathematics or the physical sciences.
  • The Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship (MLK) requires submission of an application. That application is posted at the Financial Aid website. Consideration for the MLK scholarship is based on demonstrated commitment to public interest. Deadline for submission of the MLK scholarship application is March 30, 2021. Two recipients are selected each year.

RACIAL ETHNIC DATA

The University of California is required to report to federal and state agencies the ethnic/racial composition of enrolled students. Therefore, we ask that you answer the questions about your ethnic and racial identity. The application form is the primary data source for demographic data for enrolled students. The University holds such information confidential and uses it only for aggregated statistical purposes. Furthermore, this information will in no way influence the application review process. The information you submit will be communicated to the Admission Office for statistical purposes only. The ethnicity data will not be made available to the UC Davis Law Admission Committee.

ADMISSION OFFICE CONTACT INFORMATION:

  • Email: [email protected]
  • Web: www.law.ucdavis.edu
  • Phone: (530) 752-6477
  • Mailing Address: School of Law, Admission Office, University of California-Davis, 400 Mrak Hall Drive, Davis, CA 95616-5201

APPLICATION SUBMISSION DEADLINE:

38 university of wisconsin instructions.

The Admissions Committee reviews applications based on the date they are complete, and does so on a rolling basis. The priority deadline for submission is April 1, 2021. You must submit the application itself by that date, but is possible for all other information to follow. In light of our rolling admissions policy, we strongly encourage applicants to submit all materials by December 1.

Completing the Application

Applications are considered complete when the Law School Admissions Office has received the following:

  • Application for Admission. Due on or before April 1.
  • Record of Residence Form. The Record of Residence Form must be completed by all applicants, both residents and nonresidents. After you have submitted your application, our Admissions Office will contact you by email to complete our Record of Residence form.
  • $60 application fee. The application fee should be paid by credit card through LSAC. The $60 application fee is nonrefundable and does not apply toward tuition or other fees.
  • Law School Admission Test (LSAT) Score. All applicants must submit a valid LSAT score.
  • Credential Assembly Service (CAS) report. You must have a current CAS registration and have sent a transcript to CAS from each undergraduate and graduate institution attended.
  • Personal statement. Two to three pages double-spaced, 12-point font, 1" margins.
  • Two letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation must be submitted through CAS.
  • TOEFL score for international applicants only. The TOEFL is required for all international applicants whose native language is not English. You should have your score sent to LSAC and it will be included in your CAS report.

Once you submit your application materials, they cannot be changed or returned. If there is something we haven't asked about in the application that you want to highlight, you may include two to three paragraphs as an electronic attachment marked "addendum."

The Admissions Office will notify you when your application is complete. Normally, the Admissions Committee begins reading applications in mid-November and will notify the applicant of a decision within ten to twelve weeks after the application goes into review. You will receive a letter indicating one of three decisions: admit, deny, or wait list. Applicants placed on the wait list will learn of a decision as soon as possible but may not receive an offer of admission until the first day of orientation in August. Unfortunately, we are unable to predict how many, if any, applicants will be accepted from our wait list in any given year.

Please make sure that you include the Admissions Office's e-mail address, [email protected] , in your address book and keep us up to date on address changes to prevent missing important notices sent during the admissions process.

Character and Fitness to Practice Law

In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. You must answer all character and fitness questions on your application carefully, thoroughly, and honestly . The Wisconsin Board of Bar Examiners (BBE), and any other jurisdiction you apply to, will review your student file as part of its investigation of your "character and fitness" for admission to practice law. The BBE will note any difference between the information you disclose to the Law School and the information you provide on your bar application. Nondisclosure of pertinent information on your Law School application may delay or preclude your admission to practice law. State bars, including the BBE, also conduct background investigations. These checks are extremely thorough and can reveal all contact with the criminal and civil justice system, including juvenile court records that may have been sealed or expunged. Discrepancies between information disclosed in your Law School application and information uncovered in your background investigation will require explanation and may delay or preclude your admission to practice law. Please note that satisfaction of Character and Fitness requirements for the University of Wisconsin Law School does not mean that Character and Fitness requirements for any state bar have been satisfied. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners http://www.ncbex.org/character-and-fitness/.

If you are unsure whether a matter should be disclosed, you should err on the side of full disclosure. In most circumstances, the BBE will consider a thorough, detailed, and honest disclosure of an incident for which you take responsibility as a factor tending toward a finding of adequate "character and fitness." Prior contacts with the criminal or civil justice systems, including felony convictions, do not, in and of themselves, necessarily disqualify you from practicing law nor do they necessarily preclude you from admission to the University of Wisconsin Law School.

In the event that you are admitted, you will be under a continuing obligation to disclose all character and fitness issues that occur prior to matriculation, even if the issues occur after the date of admission. If any character and fitness issues occur after you are admitted, you must notify the Admissions Committee in writing and submit an amendment to your application.

Our application requires that you prepare a personal statement, which should be two to three pages double-spaced. In your personal statement, the Admissions Committee looks for things that distinguish you from other applicants. Don't be afraid to describe an unusual experience. It is often these experiences, and your recounting of them, that can speak volumes about you, your level of self-reflection, your imagination, how you understand and engage with the world around you, and what you could bring to the Law School. We encourage you to write your personal statement in a narrative tone so that your personality and voice come through in your writing. You should envision the personal statement as your opportunity to have a "conversation" with the Admissions Committee. You should use your statement to highlight what you think is important or unique about your application, and may also use it to describe any special factors, problems, plans, or additional information you think might be useful to the Admissions Committee.

We require two letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation must be submitted through CAS. We will accept up to four letters sent as part of your CAS report. An application is considered complete upon receipt of two letters of recommendation and all other required application materials. We encourage you to choose your recommendations carefully. A well-thought-out letter from someone who can attest to your skills and abilities is more persuasive than a letter from someone who doesn't know you well. We discourage letters of recommendation written by family friends who have not had contact with you in either an academic or professional capacity. In the case of reapplication, we strongly recommend submitting two new letters of recommendation.

42 George Mason University Instructions

Instructions: george mason university antonin scalia law school.

George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School is a public law school, being part of the Virginia state university system. Located in Arlington, Virginia, just minutes from downtown Washington, D.C., Scalia Law offers tremendous opportunities to its students. We have an outstanding faculty, a state-of-the-art facility, and a student body whose talents are unrivaled.

Applicants for regular admission should submit their applications as soon as possible after September 1 . Applications are not evaluated until all required documents have been received. Please provide your name, LSAC account number, and question number on each additional sheet or electronic attachment. To be considered for admission to Scalia Law, applicants must provide the following items:

1. Application

All applicants must apply electronically via LSAC.

2. LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Law School Report

All applicants, whether taking the LSAT or GRE, must register with LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS). The CAS Report must reflect (a) all work done at undergraduate institutions, signifying that a baccalaureate degree has been or will be awarded before the start of the academic year for which admission is being sought and (b) if the applicant is applying with the LSAT, the CAS report must reflect the results of at least one Law School Admission Test (LSAT) taken within 5 years prior to the date of application submission.

The Scalia Law Credential Assembly Service Recipient Code is 5827.

The applicant has sole responsibility for meeting all of LSAC’s requirements. Failure to register properly, maintain registration throughout the admissions process, or provide transcripts and other related materials to LSAC can delay or prevent release of a report to a law school. Scalia Law is not responsible for incomplete or missing reports and will not contact applicants about incomplete or missing reports.

3. LSAT/GRE

All applicants must take either the LSAT or GRE. Applicants with both LSAT and GRE scores should submit LSAT scores only; in such cases, GRE scores will not be considered.

To be considered for our priority deadline of March 1, an application must be complete by March 1. The latest LSAT accepted for our priority deadline is the January administration. For applicants who are applying under our regular deadline of April 30, the latest LSAT accepted is the April administration.

In order to have a complete application by our March 1 priority deadline, an applicant must take the GRE prior to February 8th. For applicants who are applying under our regular deadline of April 30, the applicant must take the GRE prior to March 7th. Applicants who take the GRE instead of the LSAT must have the Educational Testing Service (ETS) send Scalia Law the GRE score. The ETS school code for Scalia Law is 2737. All applicants who apply with the GRE must subscribe and utilize the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS).

4. Character and Fitness Verification

An affirmative answer to any of the character and fitness questions on our application requires a detailed written explanation. All applicants have an ongoing duty to disclose matters that arise after completing this application, but prior to matriculation at Scalia Law, to the Admissions Office. Omissions or failure to accurately disclose matters requested on this application may result in denial or delay of bar licensure. An applicant should err on the side of full disclosure.

5. Personal Statement

The application requires submission of a personal statement not to exceed two pages, double-spaced. The thoughts and words of the personal statement must be uniquely those of the applicant. With the exception of basic proofreading, no other(s) may assist in the creation of the personal statement.

6. "Mason" Statement

The application requires submission of an additional statement not to exceed two pages, double-spaced, that discusses the applicant's particular interest in Scalia Law.

The application requires a resumé. There is no page limit.

8. Letter of Recommendation

The application requires one letter of recommendation. Scalia Law requires that applicants use the CAS Letter of Recommendation Service and follow the CAS procedures.

9. Application for In-State Tuition Rates (if applicable)

Applicants who believe they qualify for in-state tuition rates must complete the Application for Virginia In-State Tuition Rates. To print, go to the Form section of the application. This form must be submitted with your application. See Section 23-7.4, Code of Virginia, and registrar.gmu.edu/domicile regarding eligibility.

IMPORTANT NOTES FOR INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

Scalia Law requires that international transcripts be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service . If an applicant has completed any postsecondary work outside the US (including its territories) or Canada, the applicant must use the Credential Assembly Service for the evaluation of international transcripts. This service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration fee. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your Credential Assembly Service report. Questions about the Credential Assembly Service can be directed to LSAC at 215.968.1001 or [email protected] .

Note to all applicants: The one exception to required use of the Credential Assembly Service is completion of international work through a study-abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a US or Canadian institution, where the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript.

If seeking F-1 immigration status, the international applicant must submit an International Student Certificate of Financial Responsibility ( www.law.gmu.edu/admissions/financialresponsibility.pdf ). Immigration documents I-20 required for international students studying full time in the US will not be issued until the student has completed the form and returned it along with a copy of the identification page of the passport and supporting documents to:

George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School Admissions Office 3301 Fairfax Drive, MSN 1G3 Arlington, VA 22201

It is strongly recommended that international applicants submit an application no later than February 1, in order to ensure the timely processing of immigration documentation.

Equal Opportunity Policy

George Mason University is committed to providing equal opportunity and an educational and work environment free from any discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, marital status, pregnancy status or genetic information. George Mason University shall adhere to all applicable state and federal equal opportunity/affirmative action statutes and regulations.

42 University of Washington Instructions

42 wake forest university instructions, 45 university of utah instructions.

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Application Instructions for Entering JD Candidates

* (U.S. Citizens, Permanent Residents, and Resident Aliens)*

ACADEMIC PREPARATION FOR LAW SCHOOL

No specific pre-law curriculum is required for admission to the S.J. Quinney College of Law. Generally, you should seek rigorous courses from instructors who insist upon high standards of performance. Many undergraduate courses and majors can help you develop the specific skills you will need to succeed in law school and in your career. In particular, you should take courses that develop written and spoken communication, reading and comprehension, logic and analytical thinking, and problem-solving. It is critical that you master English and learn efficient study skills. A helpful resource is the “ Steps to Apply: JD Programs page at the Law School Admission Counsel website at https://www.lsac.org/jd-applicants/steps-apply-jd-programs.

ENTERING JD APPLICANTS

First-year students must attend full-time and begin their study in the 2021 Fall Semester. All applicants must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or LSAT-Flex and register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). Materials submitted in connection with your application file become the property of the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law (hereinafter S.J. Quinney College of Law) and cannot be returned, copied, or forwarded elsewhere. We require applications to be electronically submitted through LSAC’s electronic application service. This service allows you to electronically complete and submit applications for a vast majority of ABA-approved law schools. The electronic processing service will allow you to submit both your application materials and our $60 application fee through the CAS.

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENT

You may apply before you receive your undergraduate degree. Before you matriculate, however you must submit official transcripts showing the conferral of a baccalaureate degree, or the foreign equivalent of a U.S. baccalaureate degree. For domestic applicants, the U.S. college or university awarding the degree must have an accreditation recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

DIVERSE ADMISSION CRITERIA REVIEW

Admission to the S.J. Quinney College of Law is highly competitive; however, no candidate is accepted or rejected solely on a numerical basis. The range of grades and test scores of accepted candidates is broad. Factors such as breadth and difficulty of academic background, extracurricular and community activities, leadership ability, advanced degrees of study, geographic and language background, and significant work experience or life-broadening activities are also considered. You may disclose important diversity factors such as your age, gender, racial or ethnic identity, disadvantaged socioeconomic or educational background, sexual orientation, non-traditional cultural background, or other similar information.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

For the 2020-2021admissions cycle, applications may be submitted beginning on September 1, 2020. The J.D. program has three (3) application deadlines:

  • October 20, 2020 – Early Decision Program application deadline (learn more information under the "Early Decision Program" section of this application);
  • January 15, 2021 – Regular Admission process recommended application deadline; and
  • March 10, 2021 – Regular Admission process final application deadline.

All materials necessary to complete the application must be received by the prescribed deadlines. Applications submitted or completed after the March 10 deadline will be reviewed only if circumstances allow. It is the candidate's responsibility to ensure that the application file is complete.

EARLY DECISION PROGRAM

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Early Decision Program (hereinafter EDP) is designed for law school applicants who have determined the S.J. Quinney College of Law is their first-choice law school. This decision—establishing the S.J. Quinney College of Law as one’s first-choice law school—should be the result of fully researching law school options. If after investigating law schools and determining that the S.J. Quinney College of Law is your first-choice law school, you may then wish to apply through the EDP. Candidates with academic credentials at or above the medians of the current first year class are most competitive for admission via the EDP.

Early Decision Program Scholarship

Applicants admitted through the EDP are automatically awarded a renewable merit-on-entrance scholarship package. The three-year value of the scholarship package for Utah residents is just over $52,000 and for non-resident students the value is just over $77,000. The scholarship package will be disbursed in equal portions for each of the three years of a student’s enrollment at the S.J Quinney College of Law. The only requirement to renew this scholarship is to maintain good academic and behavior code standing. Admitted EDP applicants may also be eligible for need-based scholarship support. That eligibility will be determined as part of financial aid need analysis that requires the submission of a need-based scholarship application. The need analysis will occur as part of need-based financial aid packaging in spring. NOTE: Because of the timeline associated with the EDP process, admitted EDP applicants cannot expect to be in a position to compare financial aid awards from other law schools.

Early Decision Program Applicant Evaluation

S.J Quinney College of Law EDP candidates are evaluated using the same admissions criteria employed in our regular decision process. Applicants will be reviewed using a holistic evaluation process which carefully considers the following: 1) demonstrated academic skills; and 2) the qualities the applicants can bring that will enhance the law school community by virtue of their life experience, backgrounds, and interests.

Early Decision Program Application Process

The S.J Quinney College of Law EDP is a binding application program. This means that applicants applying through this program, if admitted, commit to enrolling at S.J Quinney College of Law for Fall Semester 2021.

Early Decision Program Instructions

EDP applicants must use the entering J.D. Application Form available beginning September 1 on the LSAC website. To be considered as an EDP applicant, select the Early Decision Program choice in the “Application Status” section of the JD Application Form. EDP applicants must also complete and submit the Early Decision Agreement form with the JD Application form.

The Early Decision Agreement (herein after Agreement”) acknowledges an applicant’s intent to be considered for early decision and confirms they understand the rules that govern the program. The Agreement is one of the forms available on the LSAC website. EDP applicants must sign and submit the form with their applications and supporting materials through the Credential Assembly Service (CAS), by October 20. An EDP application will not be considered complete and ready for review until the S.J. Quinney College of Law receives the Agreement. In all other respects, EDP applicants follow the regular JD application instructions.

EDP applicants may not be binding early decision applicants at other law schools. Applicants choosing to apply to the S.J. Quinney College of Law’s EDP are limited to applying to the S.J. Quinney College of Law as their only binding early decision application.

EDP applicants not admitted through the EDP process will automatically have their applications transferred into the applicant pool for the regular decision process. EDP applicants will be notified of their files’ transmission into the regular decision process on or before November 10.

Within ten (10) business days of their notification, admitted EDP applicants will be required to: (1) submit an Intent to Enroll Certification; (2) pay both a $500 seat deposit and a $600 orientation fee (both non-refundable); (3) withdraw all other outstanding law school applications; and, (4) abstain from initiating any new applications by the time they submit the Intent to Enroll Certification. NOTE: Early decision admission offers may not be deferred.

Application Timeline

EDP applicants must submit and complete their applications by October 20, 2020 to be considered for the program. The August 2020 LSAT or LSAT-Flex is the last test the S.J. Quinney College of Law will consider for early decision. EDP applicants will receive an EDP admissions decision on or before November 10, 2020.

IMPORTANT DATES

September 1, 2020 – Application filing period begins

August 29, 2020 – Last LSAT or LSAT-Flex score accepted for early decision applicants

October 20, 2020 – Early Decision Program application deadline

A nonrefundable $60 application fee is required. The fee must be submitted via the LSAC electronic application processing service and must be paid using a credit or debit card.

USE OF SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND DATE OF BIRTH

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law confidentially maintains your Social Security number and date of birth for routine uses. Disclosure of this information is voluntary, but failure to provide it may result in confusion regarding your identity and could lead to a delay in the processing of your application. Additionally, if you are accepted for admission, there may be a delay or loss of federal and state financial aid, tax credits, student loan deferments, veteran's benefits, and other benefits under law. A separate University of Utah identification number will be assigned to you during the application process.

APPLICATION FORM

Providing your Social Security number, date of birth, and the information requested in the “Personal Background” and “Miscellaneous” sections of the application form is voluntary. You must respond to all other questions and digitally sign and date the form. Please answer the questions asked on the application form in the space provided and use additional pages or electronic attachments only when necessary. Failure to answer required questions may delay the processing of your application. Re-applicants must submit a new application. In connection with many state bar licensing requirements, copies of law school applications are provided to the state bar as part of the character and fitness evaluations of bar applicants. Because the requirements of each state bar vary considerably, you are encouraged to obtain the specific requirements from the bar organization of each state in which you intend to practice law.

LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION COUNCIL ACCOUNT NUMBER

The Law School Admission Council issues individual account numbers to candidates when they register for services such as the LSAT or the Credential Assembly Service. You may obtain your LSAC account number by going to their website, www.LSAC.org .

LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION TEST

All candidates must take the LSAT or LSAT-Flex. LSAT scores from tests taken before September 2015 will not be accepted for candidates seeking admission in Fall 2021. February 2021 LSAT or LSAT-Flex scores will meet our March 10 completion deadline.

CREDENTIAL ASSEMBLY SERVICE

You must register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). As part of the CAS report, the candidate must submit transcripts from all U.S. (or foreign) colleges or universities ever attended, regardless of credits being transferred or applied toward degree requirements. This includes college or university transcripts from high school concurrent enrollment programs. It is the candidate's responsibility to ensure that transcripts from each U.S. (or foreign) college or university ever attended are sent to the CAS. Applicants who are reapplying must submit a new CAS report. Once your CAS file is complete, please allow one to three weeks for the S.J. Quinney College of Law to receive and process your CAS report in preparation for Admission Committee review. For additional information on the LSAT or LSAT-Flex, and the Credential Assembly Service, visit the LSAC website, www.LSAC.org.

PERSONAL STATEMENT

Candidates are required to submit a personal statement of no more than (2) two pages in length, with one (1) inch margins, and a font size no smaller the 10-pt. The personal statement is viewed as a document demonstrating your writing ability; therefore, the personal statement must be written by you. The Admission Committee's goal is to assemble an intellectually stimulating community of students composed of individuals who have diverse backgrounds and perspectives. In addition to outstanding academic ability, we seek students whose life experiences, backgrounds, and interests will enhance our educational community. This includes, but is not limited to, qualities such as leadership, maturity, organization, knowledge of other languages and cultures, sincere commitment to community service, a history of overcoming disadvantage, extraordinary accomplishment, or success in a previous career. The subject matter of your personal statement is up to you. The personal statement should let the Admission Committee know more about you as a person and should address the above qualities if that information is not presented in other areas of your application. Issues addressed in your personal statement may include the background, experiences, and events (positive or negative) that have affected you. You may address the perspectives and experiences you will bring to classroom discussions and the law school community or your motivations for seeking a legal education.

LETTER(S) OF RECOMMENDATION

You are required to have one (1) but may have up to three (3) letters of recommendation submitted on your behalf. Letters of recommendation should come from people who know you well and have had the opportunity to observe you, preferably, in an academic or professional setting. Letters must be submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. To use this service, follow the instructions outlined on LSAC's “ Letters of Recommendation” webpage: https://www.lsac.org/applying-law-school/jd-application-process/credential-assembly-service-cas/letters-recommendation .

APPLICANTS EDUCATED OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES

The S.J. Quinney College of Law requires that your foreign transcripts be submitted through the Credential Assembly Service. If you completed any postsecondary academic work outside the U.S. (including its territories) or Canada, you must use this service for the evaluation of your foreign transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is if you completed the foreign work through a study-abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. This service is included in the Credential Assembly Service registration fee. An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), and will be incorporated into your Credential Assembly Service Law School Report. To use the Credential Assembly Service for your international documents, follow the online instructions for registering for the service. Be sure to print out a Transcript Request Form for each institution and send it promptly to them. More time is usually required to receive foreign transcripts. Questions about foreign transcripts and the Credential Assembly Service can be directed to LSAC at 215.968.1001 or [email protected] .

APPLICANTS WHOSE NATIVE LANGUAGE IS NOT ENGLISH

Applicants whose native language is not English must submit official results from the TOEFL test. The test must have been administered within 12 months from application. You must contact the Educational Testing Service and request that your TOEFL score is sent to LSAC to be incorporated into your Credential Assembly Service Law School Report. Your score will be included in the International Credential Evaluation Document. LSAC's TOEFL code for the Credential Assembly Service is 8395. You are not required to submit a TOEFL score if you have received a baccalaureate or graduate degree from an accredited U.S. college or university.

UTAH RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS

Initial residency classification will be determined when your JD application is reviewed. For admitted candidates, the official letter of acceptance will include their residency classification.

Students classified as nonresidents are required to pay non-resident tuition. Non-resident students admitted to the S.J. Quinney College of Law are not eligible for residency reclassification once they begin their law school studies. Law students will pay tuition at the out-of-state rate for the duration of those studies even during approved “Leaves of Absence.” This university institutional residency policy supersedes all other means of qualifying for residency reclassification as outlined in the Board of Regents Policy R512 with the exception of (1) those who qualify for in-state tuition pursuant to Utah Code Section 53B-8-106, as amended; (2) those who qualify for a military service exception (as described in the University of Utah Residency Determination for Tuition Purposes Policy ); and (3) American Indians enrolled in qualifying tribes (as described in the University of Utah Residency Determination for Tuition Purposes Policy ).

If you are classified as a non-resident and question this assessment or believe you will qualify for Utah resident status before the start of Fall Semester 2021, you may complete the Residency Reclassification Application available on the University web site at: admissions.utah.edu/apply/residency/. Residency reclassification petitions should be submitted at least 45 days before the beginning of fall semester. More information on residency may be obtained from the University's Residency Office at 801.581.8761 or admissions.utah.edu/ apply/residency/.

A person who enrolls as a post-secondary student at a Utah institution prior to living in Utah for more than 12 continuous months as a non-student is presumed to have moved to Utah for the purpose of attending an institution of higher education, and is a non-resident for tuition purposes.

J.D. APPLICANT CHECKLIST

The Admission Committee will consider your file incomplete until the following items have been received and processed:

  • ​ Completed and digitally signed application form for the J.D.Program
  • ​ Official Credential Assembly Service report
  • ​ All official higher education transcripts
  • ​ Nonrefundable $60 application fee
  • ​ Personal statement (two (2) page limit, one (1) inch margins, and font size no smaller than 10 pt.)
  • ​ One letter ofrecommendation
  • ​ For applicants educated outside the U.S.,foreign transcript evaluation from LSAC and a TOEFL score report (if necessary)

You may submit any other information you believe is relevant.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

The S.J. Quinney College of Law provides a high-quality education at a cost well below that of most peer schools, both in terms of tuition and cost of living. The typical first-year student can meet the cost of law school with a financial aid package that may include federal student loans, a college scholarship, and a small amount of personal savings or a family contribution. First-year students are encouraged not to work during the academic year. Many advanced law students may borrow less than first-year students because when they have summer and/or part-time compensated employment. The University of Utah requires students wishing to be considered for financial aid to submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). By submitting the FAFSA, a need-analysis is conducted, including determining the amount a student can be expected to contribute to their educational costs. Even if you have not received an admission decision, you should complete and submit a FAFSA by February 1. Information about the FAFSA and Federal Student Loan Programs can be found at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

COLLEGE OF LAW MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS

The S.J. Quinney College of Law offers privately funded merit-on-entrance scholarships to selected first-year students. All accepted candidates (including international applicants) are considered on the basis of their admission applications; recipients are notified by the S.J. Quinney College of Law beginning in January for the regular admission process. There are also some merit-based scholarships, fellowships, and stipend programs available to second- and third-year students. More information on these scholarship and award programs can be found at www.law.utah.edu/awards/.

S.J. QUINNEY COLLEGE OF LAW NEED-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS

These private-source scholarships are awarded by the S.J. Quinney College of Law. A FAFSA and a supplemental application form (mailed to applicants offered admission) are required. Only U.S. Citizens or Permanent Residents are eligible for College of Law Need-Based Scholarships. Need-based scholarships generally range from $500 to $4,500.

CAMPUS HOUSING

Graduate housing for single students and families is available in off campus apartments new the University of Utah. University housing for single students and students with families is available on campus in one- or multi-bedroom apartments. Some complexes feature community centers, preschool and early childhood educational programs, adult activities, landscaped grounds, gardens, and picnic areas. Additionally, the S.J. Quinney Law House accommodates up to 12 law and honors prelaw students. It is located on the Officers Circle of Heritage Commons. Demand for campus housing varies; please contact these offices well in advance of your needs. For housing information, you may contact the follow offices:

Housing & Residential Education 801.587.2002 housing.utah.edu

University Student Apartments 801.581.8667 apartments.utah.edu/

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING

Housing in pleasant neighborhoods is available within walking distance of campus and throughout Salt Lake City. Accommodations include large, medium, and small apartment complexes, condominiums, townhouses, duplexes, single-family residences, and rooming houses.

46 University of Colorado—Boulder Instructions

47 pepperdine university instructions.

Applicants for admission to the first-year class should have received a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university prior to law school enrollment.

Filing of Application

Complete the Application for Admission. Ensure each question has been answered completely, as the failure to do so will result in a delay in the review of the application.

You must complete the following:

- Character and Fitness

- Personal Statement

- Registration with the Credential Assembly Service. Your CAS must include your writing sample. Request your official transcript(s) and two letters of recommendation be sent directly to LSAC.

Accelerated Two-Year JD and Traditional Three-Year JD

  • Priority Deadline: February 1
  • Final Deadline: April 1

All applicants must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and request the score be reported to Pepperdine Caruso Law. Applicants are encouraged to take the LSAT early but no later than April of the year in which admission is sought. LSAT scores are valid for five years.

Applications for the LSAT and information regarding testing centers are available at LSAC.org or by calling LSAC at (215) 968-1001.

Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Test

Pepperdine Caruso Law will accept the GRE test. We will only accept official GRE scores reports from ETS. Please indicate Pepperdine University as a recipient of your test scores and indicate our school code of 4371. For more information on submitting official score reports, please visit the ETS website . Applicants are encouraged to take the GRE early but no later than April of the year in which admission is sought. GRE scores are valid for five years.

Additional information regarding applying to Pepperdine Caruso Law with a GRE score can be found on our website here . Registration information for the GRE can be found on the ETS website .

Credential Assembly Service

All applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service. You may register through LSAC at LSAC.org . Once you have registered, an official transcript must be sent to LSAC from each educational institution you have attended. Please send transcripts to LSAC at: Law School Admission Council, 662 Penn Street, Box 2000-M, Newtown, PA 18940-0993. All transcript updates must be submitted to LSAC as well, not to Pepperdine Caruso School of Law.

Internationally-educated applicants must use the Credential Assembly Service. All international transcripts should be sent to the address listed above.

LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Law School Reports are requested upon receipt of the application.

Pepperdine Caruso Law requires two letters of recommendation. Recommendations should be furnished by those individuals who can best assess your ability to succeed in law school. When possible, at least one of the recommendations should be provided by a faculty member with whom you pursued your undergraduate studies. Relatives should not be asked to submit recommendations. Pepperdine requires that your letters be submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service. This service is included in your Credential Assembly Service registration. Your letters will be copied and sent to Pepperdine Caruso Law along with your law school report when the Letter of Recommendation Service has received both letters. To use this service, follow the directions for submitting letters outlined on LSAC's website, LSAC.org .

Application Review Process

We admit students on a rolling basis, with decisions typically made between December and May. You will be notified of your decision via email.

If you are placed on the waitlist, we encourage you to periodically submit letters of continued interest. You may also update your file with new information that may support an offer of admission, including but not limited to additional letters of recommendation, an updated résumé, or a new LSAT score. If you have been placed on the waitlist, please direct all correspondence to [email protected].

We do not have an admissions appeals process, but you may reapply in a subsequent year. Application files are maintained from previous years, so you should consider updating your personal statement and supplemental information. We recommend you submit at least one new letter of recommendation.

Admitted applicants are required to make two deposits to the Pepperdine Caruso School of Law. The first deposit of $400 is required by April 15. The second deposit of $600 is required by June 15. For those who matriculate into the program, both nonrefundable seat deposits will be applied toward the first semester's tuition. Applicants admitted after April 1 will be given a later first seat deposit deadline. Applicants admitted after June 1 will be given a later seat deposit deadline.

Official Undergraduate Transcript

After accepting the offer of admission, admitted students must have an official transcript sent to Pepperdine University Rick J. Caruso School of Law directly from each college or university which granted a degree, showing the degree and confer date. The transcripts must be on file by October 5. All transcripts and documents submitted become the property of Pepperdine University and are not returnable. A student's final admission to Pepperdine cannot be granted until such transcripts are on file.

47 University of Arizona Instructions

47 university of maryland instructions.

To be eligible to apply for admission to the Juris Doctor program at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, you must have a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university or expect to graduate during the current academic year.

APPLICATION DEADLINE

The application priority deadline is April 1, 2021. However, so long as space remains in the first-year class, we will continue to process applications and extend offers of admission until August 1, 2021.

APPLICATION FEES AND DEPOSITS

The application fee is $70 and must be paid online by credit card through LSAC. All fees and deposits are non-refundable .

REVIEW PROCESS

The Admissions Committee at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law makes admission decisions on a rolling basis. The Committee evaluates the academic potential of applicants through a thorough assessment of each applicant's academic record, professional and educational experiences, and accomplishments. In addition, the Committee identifies candidates who will enhance the professional development of their peers and will contribute positively to the law school community as a whole.

BINDING EARLY DECISION PROGRAM

Applicants who are certain that the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law is their first-choice law school may apply under our Binding Early Decision Program. Candidates applying to this program must submit a completed application, including the required Binding Early Decision Agreement form , to Maryland Carey Law by December 1, 2020 and can expect to receive a decision by December 18, 2020. Applicants who apply past the deadline will have their applications transferred into the regular decision applicant pool.

3+3 DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM

This program is designed for students enrolled at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP), who will have completed 90 credit hours (at least 30 credits at UMCP, including all University of Maryland general education requirements) by the time they would enroll in law school. These students are eligible to receive the Bachelor’s degree from UMCP after completion of 30 credits, or one year, at Maryland Carey Law. Students admitted under this program are eligible to receive the JD degree after successful completion of all graduation requirements at Maryland Carey Law. Learn more about the 3+3 Dual Degree Program » .

FIRST-YEAR JD APPLICATION CHECKLIST

A completed application for a first-year JD applicant consists of the following:

  • The application form, submitted online through LSAC .
  • The non-refundable $70 application fee, submitted online by credit card through LSAC.
  • A valid score from either the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) . Test scores are valid for five years only.
  • All official undergraduate and graduate transcripts . Applicants must request official undergraduate and graduate transcripts and have them submitted directly to LSAC.
  • Two letters of recommendation . Applicants are required to submit two letters of recommendation, but no more than four, through the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Recommenders should include instructors under whom you have studied or with whom you have worked closely during college or graduate study. If you have not had recent contact with such individuals, you may submit letters of recommendation from employers. Please do not submit letters of recommendation from personal friends and relatives, as they will not be given weight in the admissions process.
  • Credential Assembly Service. All applicants are required to register and submit the appropriate materials through LSAC's Credential Assembly Service (CAS), including their LSAT score(s) (if applicable), all official transcripts, letters of recommendation, and all other required components of the application.
  • *Personal Statement.* Applicants are required to submit a personal statement. We recommend that you use the personal statement to present to the Admissions Committee information and perspectives regarding your background, experience, special circumstances and interests that you believe will help the Committee understand your unique story. In addition, the statement should address why you are interested in obtaining a law degree and, more specifically, in attending the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. The personal statement should be no longer than 750 words, double-spaced, and must be typed and not hand-written. Upload your personal statement as an attachment to the application form.
  • Résumé : Submit a résumé or curriculum vitae detailing your education, employment, skills, honors, awards, and accomplishments. Upload document as an attachment to the application form.
  • Diversity Statement (Optional) : Maryland Carey Law is committed to promoting diversity in legal education and in the profession as a whole. Toward that end, the Admissions Committee invites you to submit a statement explaining how you would contribute meaningfully to the diversity of the law school. For example, your statement may address how characteristics such as, but not limited to, your geographic origin, age, culture and language, or your experience overcoming barriers presented by race, socioeconomic status, or disability demonstrate your capacity to make a special contribution to our law school community. Limit the length of the statement to approximately 250 words. Upload the statement as an attachment to the application form.
  • Admissions Interview : The Admissions Committee at Maryland Carey Law may request to interview applicants as part of the application review process and prior to issuing a decision. Interview requests are made at the sole discretion of the Admissions Committee, and candidates are not able to request interviews.
  • Free Application for Federal Student Aid: The University of Maryland, Baltimore requires submission of the FAFSA for every student expecting to receive any form of financial aid, including those receiving merit-based aid only. The FAFSA becomes available on October 1, 2020 for the 2021-22 academic year. Please submit your FAFSA form as soon as possible after it becomes available. The University has set a deadline of March 1 for receipt of the FAFSA. Submit this form online at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/, and enter the code for the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus: 002104.

ATTACHMENTS

Please upload attachments through the "Attachments" tab. Attachments should include your personal statement, résumé or curriculum vitae, diversity statement (optional), information about a prior law school that you have attended, information in explanation of any character and fitness issue, and any other information relevant to your application.

APPLICATION FOR IN-STATE CLASSIFICATION (MARYLAND RESIDENTS ONLY)

The Office of the Registrar for the University of Maryland, Baltimore makes residency determinations. Applicants claiming Maryland residency must complete the online Application for In-State Classification at https://www.umaryland.edu/application/. All applicants are considered non-residents for tuition purposes until the Application for In-State Classification has been submitted and approved. For more information about the in-state classification process and criteria, please visit https://www.umaryland.edu/registrar/residency/.

DISCLOSURE POLICY: CHARACTER AND FITNESS FOR BAR ADMISSION

Just as lawyers are held to high ethical standards, so are University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law students. One ethical duty is to fully and accurately disclose the information sought in our application. The failure to provide honest and accurate information in the application is a very serious matter and may result in a delay, rescission or denial of admission to the School of Law and/or a denial of admission to the bar. Applicants have a continuing duty throughout the application, admission and enrollment process to inform the Office of Admissions of any changes in the information provided in the application to ensure that it remains complete and accurate.

In addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every US jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

Responding to Character and Fitness Questions in the Application

Please carefully read and respond to the 12 questions in the application that relate to your Character and Fitness for Admission to the Bar. The failure to provide honest and accurate answers to the questions on the application is very serious, often more significant than the act or event requiring disclosure. The questions we ask in this section track the questions that will be asked by many state bar admission authorities.

FAILURE TO DISCLOSE THIS INFORMATION IN A TIMELY MANNER MAY RESULT IN DISCIPLINARY ACTION BY THE SCHOOL OF LAW AND COULD DELAY OR EVEN PREVENT YOUR ADMISSION TO THE BAR.

For any affirmative answer, please electronically attach a statement marked “Character and Fitness.” Your answer should include the date and location (city, town and state) of each incident, a description of the incident, and a full explanation of the circumstances surrounding – and the resolution of – each event. The University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law reserves the right to request additional information from you, including further explanation concerning the incidents in question, court records, documents, or any other relevant information.

Applicants have a continuing duty throughout the application, admission, and enrollment process to inform the Office of Admissions of any changes in the information provided in the application to ensure that it remains complete and accurate. Failure to provide truthful answers, or failure to inform the Office of Admissions of any changes to your answers, may result in revocation of admission or disciplinary action by the Law School, or denial of permission to practice law by the state in which you seek admission to the bar.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE COMPETENCY EXAMS

Because facility with written and spoken English is necessary in order to successfully participate in our academic experience, applicants for whom English is a second language or not their primary language and who have not completed the entirety of their undergraduate education in an English-speaking institution must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

Request that scores be sent directly to LSAC: LSAC has arranged with the Educational Testing Service (ETS) to receive your TOEFL Score. Please provide LSAC institution code (8395) when requesting that your score be sent to LSAC. LSAC has also arranged with IELTS to receive scores. LSAC will only accept scores from IELTS electronically. You must request that your score be forwarded to LSAC for electronic download.

Note: TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years.

Request for Waiver of TOEFL/IELTS: If you believe that you are proficient in English and that the English Language Competency Exam requirement should be waived in your case, please submit a statement describing your English language instruction and proficiency. Upload attachment(s) when completing the application form.

APPLICANTS WITH DISABILITIES

The School's admissions policies fully comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other applicable laws and regulations. Consistent with the School's commitment to diversity, the life experiences and backgrounds of applicants with disabilities may be viewed positively in admissions decisions. Applicants may use the personal statement or the diversity statement to emphasize these factors.

SIGNATURE AND DATE

Please type your name, and date the application. By signing this application and transmitting it electronically, you certify that the information in this application is complete, accurate and honestly presented. You also certify that any information submitted on your behalf is authentic, including letters of recommendation, academic transcripts and certifications. You understand and agree that any inaccurate, misleading or omitted information will be cause for an investigation of misconduct in the admissions process, rescission of any offer of admission, or cause for disciplinary action, dismissal or revocation of degree if discovered at a later date. You further agree to abide by the rules, policies, and regulations of the University of Maryland if you are admitted as a student.

If you have questions about this application or about the admissions process, please contact the Office of Admissions at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law at (410) 706-3492 or [email protected] . Be sure to notify the Office of Admissions promptly of any change in your address as well as any new facts that may change the responses to any part of your application.

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Office of Admissions

500 West Baltimore Street, Suite 130

Baltimore, Maryland 21201

  • 706-3492 (phone)

[email protected]

The University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, physical or mental disability, marital status, protected veteran's status, or age. The University is required by federal regulatory agencies to supply admissions and enrollment information by racial, ethnic and gender categories. Provision of the information is voluntary and will not be used to determine eligibility for admission.

50 Baylor University Instructions

Thank you for applying to Baylor Law!

All application materials must be electronically transmitted by 11:59 p.m., Central Standard Time, on the application deadline dates listed below:

  • November 13, 2020 - Spring 2021 Admission
  • November 13, 2020 - Early Decision Program (non-binding) for Fall 2021 Admission
  • March 19, 2021 - Summer 2021 Admission
  • March 19, 2021 - Regular Decision Program for Fall 2021 Admission

There is no application fee for any applicant who submits an electronic application.

Baccalaureate Degree

Each applicant must have a baccalaureate degree from a four-year, accredited university or be enrolled in a course of study at a four-year, accredited university that will lead to the awarding of a baccalaureate degree prior to the end of the applicant's first law school term.

Current Mailing and E-mail Address

A decision letter will be mailed to the applicant's current mailing address. All other correspondence will be sent to the applicant's primary email address. Therefore, if either of these addresses changes, the applicant should notify the Admissions Office immediately.

Early Decision Program (non-binding)

Baylor Law offers a non-binding early decision program for Fall admission. To be considered for this program, applicants must submit applications on or before November 13 and have completed their application files by November 20. Early decision applicants will receive a decision by December 15. Application files that remain incomplete after November 20 will be rolled over to the regular decision program.

All applicants are required to take the LSAT. The LSAT must be taken prior to the application deadline date for the quarter to which an applicant is seeking admission. Exceptions regarding the test date are made on a case-by-case basis. Contact Baylor Law to request an exception.

LSAT registration information is available by visiting LSAC.org , by sending an e-mail to [email protected] , or by writing to LSAC, Box 2000, 662 Penn Street, Newtown PA 18940-0998.

All applicants must register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) and make arrangements to have each undergraduate transcript mailed to LSAC at Box 2000, 662 Penn Street, Newtown PA 18940-0998. The CAS is the division of LSAC that collects and analyzes academic data and transcripts. All applicants must also comply with all Credential Assembly Service notifications and payment requirements. The CAS furnishes law schools with college transcripts, LSAT scores, and letters of recommendation.

Baylor Law requires the submission of one letter of recommendation per applicant, preferably from someone who can attest to the applicant's ability to enter a competitive professional program. To avoid delays in the consideration of the application, Baylor Law requires that the letter be submitted through the LSAC Letter of Recommendation Service that serves all member schools. This service is included in the CAS registration. The letter will be copied and sent along with the law school report. To use this service, an applicant should follow the directions for submitting letters outlined on LSAC.org , making sure to fill out and give the letter writer a Letter of Recommendation Form.

Additional letters of recommendation are not necessary; however, an applicant may submit a maximum of three letters. Baylor Law strongly recommends that additional letters of recommendation be submitted through the Letter of Recommendation Service. Since application files may be reviewed shortly after receipt of law school reports, Baylor Law cannot guarantee that additional letters of recommendation will be considered by the Admissions Committee if the letters are received after an application file has been sent to the Admissions Committee for review. Furthermore, Baylor Law cannot accommodate special requests to hold application files awaiting an additional letter or letters of recommendation.

Each applicant must electronically attach a personal statement, which should be approximately two to three pages in length, double-spaced, and in 12-point font. The personal statement must be the applicant's own work product. It should be prepared without the assistance of other persons or of professional writing services, although others may review it (e.g., your pre-law advisor). This is the applicant's opportunity to persuade the Admissions Committee that he or she should be admitted to Baylor Law. Through the personal statement, the Committee will try to get a sense of the applicant's character and also will evaluate his or her writing ability. Any number of factors could be helpful to the Admissions Committee, including the applicant's motivation to study law; past work experience and future career objectives; evidence of academic achievement, leadership, and responsibility; community involvement; educational, social, and economic background; and any special skills or training, such as bilingual language skills, advocacy skills, or scientific or technical training. The Committee is particularly interested in learning about any aspect of the applicant's background that would allow him or her to distinctively enrich the law school environment and alumni community.

A résumé is required. It is not limited to one page or to professional activities and should highlight volunteer activities and special skills as well.

Applying for Admission to More Than One Quarter

Baylor Law operates on a true quarter system and enrolls entering students in three of its four quarters—Spring, Summer, and Fall. The application pool for the Fall class is larger than the application pool for the Spring and Summer classes, making admission into the Fall class more difficult. Most law schools admit one class per year in the Fall; therefore, most applicants only consider applying to Fall classes. At Baylor Law, smaller application pools for the Spring and Summer classes provide students with a better chance of admission. Therefore, an applicant can apply for admission to more than one quarter at a time. If an applicant is interested in applying to more than one quarter, that applicant must submit a separate application form for each quarter for which he or she wants to be considered.

Follow-up E-mails and Online Status-Checking Feature

Within one week of receiving the application form, the Admissions Office will send an e-mail confirming receipt of the application. This e-mail will contain instructions on how to check, 24/7, the status of the application. Additionally, within two business days of an application's completion, the Admissions Office will send an e-mail. If the applicant indicated on the application form that he or she will be taking or retaking a future LSAT, the Admissions Office will hold the file until receipt of that LSAT score, unless otherwise notified by the applicant.

Prior Law School Attendance

An applicant who enrolled at another law school, even for a brief amount of time, is required to submit a letter of good standing to the Admissions Office. If exams were taken, a transcript must also be sent. Applications will not be considered complete until these items are received. If an applicant attends another law school while he or she still has an active application file at Baylor Law, he or she must notify the Admissions Office of this fact in writing.

International Degree Applicants

In addition to the requirements for all applicants, applicants who have earned undergraduate degrees from institutions outside the United States and Canada must submit copies of international transcripts through the CAS. If an applicant completed any postsecondary work outside the United States (including its territories) or Canada, he or she must use this service for the evaluation of international transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is if the international work was completed through a study-abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. This service is included in the CAS registration fee. An international credential evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into the CAS Report. If the Admissions Committee determines that the applicant needs to submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score, the applicant must contact the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be sent to LSAC. LSAC's TOEFL code for the Credential Assembly Service is 8395. The score will be included in the international credential evaluation document that will be included in the law school report.

Applicants with international degrees must take the LSAT. Many forms of financial aid are not available to international students. Therefore, international degree applicants need to evaluate their abilities to meet the total education costs and to obtain the necessary visas. International degree applicants must be prepared to fund all of their educational and living expenses for the entire three years of law school.

Transfer Applicants

A student who desires to transfer from another American Bar Association-accredited school and has completed at least two semesters as a full-time student (or the equivalent as a part-time student) may apply to be a transfer student to Baylor Law.

The primary factors considered for admission for transfer applications are the applicant's previous law school performance, cumulative undergraduate grade-point average, and LSAT score.

In addition to completing the standard requirements for admission (including resubscribing to CAS), each transfer applicant must also submit the following items:

  • A letter of good standing from the dean or registrar of the current law school;
  • An official transcript showing law school grades for all terms attended; and
  • An essay explaining the reasons for wanting to transfer to Baylor Law.

The transfer application and all supporting materials must be received by the following deadlines:

  • Spring 2021: January 15, 2021
  • Summer 2021: March 19, 2021
  • Fall 2021: July 15, 2021

Visiting Students

A student attending another American Bar Association-accredited law school may apply to attend Baylor Law as a visiting student, subject to space, availability, and qualifications.

A visiting student must submit the following items:

  • An application for admission;
  • A copy of the CAS report (submitted by the home law school);
  • An official copy of the law school transcript;
  • A letter of good standing from the dean or registrar of the home law school;
  • A statement outlining the applicant's interest in being a visiting student; and
  • A statement notifying the Admissions Committee of how many quarters the applicant wishes to attend Baylor Law.

The visiting student's application and all supporting materials must be received during the following time frames:

50 Florida State University Instructions

Applicant Instructions and Checklist for Florida State University College of Law

Florida State University encourages applications for admission from qualified students regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, veteran or marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, or any other protected group status in accordance with all pertinent federal, state, and local laws on non-discrimination and equal opportunity.

The College of Law seeks to admit and enroll students who, together, bring to the law school a varied set of backgrounds, interests, personal and professional experiences and perspectives, who also have a record of academic success and a competitive LSAT or GRE score. Other factors considered include exceptional personal talents, interesting or demanding work experience, rigorousness of undergraduate course study, leadership potential, graduate study, maturity and the ability to communicate effectively.

Although a holistic approach is taken when reviewing applications, most admission decisions are based on the combination of LSAT or GRE score and the cumulative undergraduate GPA. An applicant's responses to the character and fitness questions in the application are also a significant factor in the decision-making process.

If you have questions about the admissions process or Florida State University College of Law, please contact the Office of Admissions at 850-644-3787 or [email protected] .

Social Security Number

The Social Security Number (SSN) provided on your application MUST be your actual SSN AND match the SSN provided on your FAFSA. Your application cannot be completed without your actual SSN on record. If your SSN on your application does not match the SSN in the university system or on your FAFSA, you will be required to provide a copy of your social security card to the Office of Admissions to verify your true SSN. Financial Aid cannot be packaged if there is a discrepancy with your SSN.

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Students are encouraged to submit the FAFSA as close to the release date of October 1 as possible for priority consideration. Make sure you list Florida State University (school code #001489) on your FAFSA. www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Notice to Applicants Regarding Character and Fitness and the Need for Full Disclosure

Each jurisdiction establishes bar registration and admission standards for individuals who wish to practice within the jurisdiction. One important aspect of admission to practice is an evaluation of an applicant's character and fitness to practice law. Applicants should take care to respond fully and accurately to each question on the law school application. Applicants are obligated to continuously and fully disclose any new issues that arise after the application has been submitted throughout the entirety of the admissions process.

Applicants should be aware that, in conducting character and fitness investigations, bar examiners frequently request copies of candidates' applications for admission to law school to determine whether they have supplied erroneous, misleading, or incomplete information in the admission process. If discrepancies are found, bar examiners may conclude that such discrepancies demonstrate a lack of honesty, trustworthiness, diligence, or reliability so as to call into question the applicant's fitness for admission to the bar.

Eligibility Notice

Applicants must hold a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited, U.S. institution, will have earned a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution, or hold the international equivalent of a U.S. bachelor's degree prior to the commencement of fall classes in order to be eligible for consideration.

Applicants applying through one of our formal 3+3 programs must have at minimum 90 credit hours and have met all other requirements set forth within the 3+3 program in order to be eligible for consideration.

Applicants that have previously attended law school are not eligible to apply as an entering 1L and must apply as a transfer. Please see the transfer application for details if you have previously attended law school. Individuals who have previously been academically dismissed from a law school are not eligible to apply to Florida State University College of Law.

Important Dates & Deadlines for First-Time J.D. Applicants

1st: Florida State Law begins accepting applications.

Decisions are made on a rolling basis throughout the cycle beginning in October.

15th: Deadline to submit a completed application as an Early Binding Decision (EBD) candidate. Please visit our website for specifics regarding applying as an EBD candidate.

15th: Early Binding Decision applicants notified of the decision on their application.

31st: Early Binding Decision deposit deadline for admitted EBD applicants.

Latest LSAT test date acceptable for fall priority deadline (March 15) consideration.

15th: Fall priority application completion deadline. Priority consideration given to the strongest applications completed by the priority deadline.

15th: Primary deposit deadline for admitted students. Admitted students should refer to their admission packet for their specific deadline date.

Latest LSAT test date acceptable for fall consideration.

31st: Fall application deadline. All applications must be complete by the deadline to receive consideration.

25th: All final decisions will be communicated.

For specific details regarding checklist items, visit Admissions & Financial Aid on our website at law.fsu.edu.

REQUIRED ITEMS

  • Register with the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) Credential Assembly Service (CAS)
  • Online application through LSAC
  • Application fee: $30 paid through LSAC
  • Submit transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate coursework completed through CAS
  • Take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and the LSAT Writing or the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) [*See LSAT/GRE note below*].
  • Personal Statement (2-3 pages, typed and double-spaced)
  • Resume (1-2 pages)
  • Residency Affidavit (residency document copies are also required for Florida residents)
  • Character & Fitness Disclosures (affirmative responses require a written explanation and official documentation for each violation)

LSAT/GRE TEST NOTE:

  • Applicants may submit either the LSAT or GRE as part of their application, but not both tests .
  • If an applicant has an existing reportable LSAT score, a GRE score will not be considered in lieu of the existing LSAT.
  • GRE scores may be utilized only when a reportable LSAT does not exist.
  • If the GRE is the test score submitted, all reportable test scores for the last five years must be submitted with the application.
  • The latest LSAT score accepted for fall consideration is from the June administration of the admissions cycle.
  • It can take four to six weeks for GRE scores to be processed by the university and included with the application once the official score report is received from ETS. An unofficial copy of the GRE score report should be uploaded to the application through LSAC.

LSAT WRITING

  • Applicants must take the LSAT Writing portion, which is independently tested from the LSAT.
  • LSAT scores will not be released by LSAC without an LSAT Writing on file for the CAS Report.
  • Applicants with a prior reportable written portion on record with LSAC do not need to take the written portion again.
  • Submission of a new LSAT Writing only portion after a decision has been made will not qualify for reconsideration of a previously denied application.
  • The LSAT Writing is not required for GRE applicants as the GRE contains a written assessment as part of the test.

OPTIONAL ITEMS

\1. Academic Addendum (1 page)

\2. Diversity Statement (1-3 pages, typed and double-spaced)

\3. Letters of Recommendation (maximum of 2)

Documents not submitted with the application through LSAC must be emailed or mailed to:

[email protected]

Florida State University College of Law

Attention: Office of Admissions R208

425 West Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306

International students and others who have completed undergraduate education outside of the United States should submit their transcripts to LSAC through CAS for evaluation. A minimum educational equivalency of a bachelor's degree must be met for eligibility. Students are required to file the law school application and the Florida State University International Certificate of Financial Responsibility. International students whose native language is not English, and who did not receive a bachelor's degree from an undergraduate institution within the United States, are required to take either the TOEFL or the IELTS and have official scores submitted through LSAC as part of the application.

TOEFL Requirement

Minimum scores of 100 on the Internet-based, 250 on the computer-based, and 600 on the paper-based TOEFL test are required. Information on the TOEFL can be obtained by writing to TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, or by visiting their website at www.toefl.com .

IELTS Requirement

Minimum score of 7.5 on the IELTS test is required. Information on the IELTS can be obtained by visiting their website at www.ielts.org.

Applications are evaluated from October through August by the admissions committee. Decisions are made on a rolling basis and priority consideration is given to the strongest applications completed by the priority deadline of March 15. Applications completed after March 15 but by the final deadline of July 31 may not receive a timely decision and limit the opportunity for scholarship consideration.

Law School Scholarships

50 University of Connecticut Instructions

Before you start, the application deadline is april 30, 2021..

  • All applications must be submitted electronically through the LSAC. If you require a reasonable accommodation for a disability, please contact us at [email protected].
  • You have an ongoing obligation to notify us of any changes to your application. Please be sure to have a current email address on file as all our communications will be electronic.
  • You are the only person to whom we will release information. Please provide written permission if you would like to release information to parents, partners, or anyone else contacting the office on your behalf.

Application for Admission

  • Please read and follow the directions carefully. You must answer all application questions and submit relevant attachments and forms. All answers must be current to the date of submission.
  • Applications may be submitted for consideration after September 1, 2020, and must be released by LSAC no later than April 30, 2021.
  • All essays and documents attached for consideration must be properly identified and must be submitted electronically.
  • You must register for the LSAC Credential Assembly Service (CAS).
  • You are required to submit transcripts from every college and university, graduate and professional school you attended, however brief.
  • For additional information, please visit LSAC.org
  • International and foreign educated students, please see, “Authentication and Evaluation for International and Foreign Educated Students” section below.

Application Questions

Biographical, demographic and contact information.

Please answer all required fields.

If you select “Non-Resident Alien,” you must answer the following:

  • Visa/SEVIS number
  • Permanent City

If you select “US Permanent Resident,” you must provide your Permanent Resident Number.

LSAT (required)

  • You must register for and take the LSAT.
  • Any LSAT taken prior to June 2016 or after June 2021 will be invalid for 2021 admission.
  • Information about the LSAT can be found at LSAC.org

TOEFL (if applicable)

  • If you received your Bachelor’s degree from an institution outside of the United States and your education was in a language other than English you must submit a TOEFL score.
  • To include your TOEFL score with the CAS report, you must contact the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be sent to LSAC. LSAC’s TOEFL code for the JD Credential Assembly Service is 0058. If submitted to CAS, your score will then be included in your CAS report.
  • Although we prefer you submit your TOEFL through CAS, you may send TOEFL scores directly to the Office of Admissions at [email protected] .

Education and Military Service

  • Please answer all questions.
  • Please list every college and university, graduate and professional school attended, however brief and regardless of whether or not credit was received. Include the dates of attendance, major, degree and date degree was awarded. Include any enrollment, however brief, at any law school, whether or not credit was received.

Connecticut High School

  • Please answer yes or no to this question. If yes, please provide the name of your high school, location and dates of attendance, including graduation date.

Application Type

  • You may apply to either the Day or Evening Division. Please select the division to which you wish to apply.
  • Please only identify family members who are UConn School of Law alumni.
  • If you reply “yes” to any character and fitness question, you must provide an essay fully explaining the circumstances.
  • If you have ever been subject to disciplinary action by a professional organization or state licensing board, or had a professional license placed on probation, suspended or revoked, in addition to the essay, you must also attach documentation showing reinstatement of any license that has been subject to disciplinary action.
  • If you have ever been arrested, charged and/or convicted of a crime, in addition to the essay, you must provide documentation (police and/or court records) for all such arrests, charges and/or convictions. All documentation must be uploaded in the attachment section. If unable to attach please send electronic copies via email to [email protected] .
  • If you have any criminal or disciplinary charges of any type pending, you must attach an explanatory essay along with relevant documentation.
  • If you have been a defendant in any civil proceeding in which allegations of fraud, misrepresentation or other improper conduct were made against you, in addition to the essay, you must attach relevant documentation.
  • It is your responsibility to obtain copies of any required records; we will not contact a courthouse or attorney on your behalf.
  • Your file will remain incomplete until we receive all required documentation.

Law School Interest

Certification.

  • Please enter the date on which you submit the application.

All essays and documents attached for consideration must be properly numbered, have your name and LSAC account number at the top of each page, and be submitted electronically.

Personal Statement (required)

  • Please submit a personal statement offering the Admissions Committee some insight about your decision to study law. The Admissions Committee is interested in learning more about your character, intellectual abilities, and writing skills. Your ability to write clearly, concisely and persuasively is important.
  • The Admissions Committee asks your personal statement be submitted in 12 point font, be double spaced, and be no longer than two pages.
  • You may include an optional essay or addendum which addresses additional information not included in your personal statement. This statement should provide further explanation or details which may not be readily apparent in other parts of your application.
  • The Admissions Committee asks that optional essays to be submitted in 12 point font, be double spaced, and be no longer than one page.

Residency Affidavit (required)

  • You must submit the required Residency Affidavit, regardless of your state of permanent residency.
  • To access the Residency Affidavit, please click here .
  • Please complete all questions on this statutorily-required form.
  • Once completed please save the document in one of the following supported formats: DOC, HTM, HTML, TXT, WP, WPD, RTF, WPS, WPT, DOCX, PDF. Once saved, please upload the document via the Attachments section (Residency Affidavit Form).

Résumé (required)

  • You must attach a résumé. Please make sure that all entries are current to the date of submission. Please include military service and summer employment.
  • Your résumé will be shared with the Scholarship Committee and donors for scholarship consideration. If you do not want your résumé shared, please email the Admissions Office at [email protected] .
  • Your résumé will be shared with the Career Planning Center after matriculation to allow our counselors to prepare for résumé counseling and workshops.

Character and Fitness (if applicable)

  • If you answered “yes” to any of the questions in the Character and Fitness section of the Application Questions, you are required to attach an essay for each affirmative answer.
  • Applicants and current students are advised that in addition to a bar examination, there are character, fitness, and other qualifications for admission to the bar in every U.S. jurisdiction. Applicants are encouraged to determine the requirements for any jurisdiction in which they intend to seek admission by contacting the jurisdiction. Addresses for all relevant agencies are available through the National Conference of Bar Examiners .

Letters of Recommendation (required)

  • Two letters of recommendation are required.
  • Submit all letters through the Letter of Recommendation Service (LOR), which is included with your CAS registration.
  • The Committee prefers letters from people who know you well.
  • Recent graduates must submit two academic letters of recommendation.
  • The Committee may also request additional letters of recommendation if an additional recommendation might provide greater detail and insight.
  • You may submit evaluations through the LSAC Evaluation Service. Although these evaluations are not required and will not replace the two required letters of recommendation, they will be considered by the Committee.

Authentication and Evaluation for International and Foreign Educated Students

  • UConn School of Law Admissions Committee requires all foreign transcripts to be submitted through the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) Authentication and Evaluation service.
  • If you were directly enrolled at an institution outside the US, its territories, or Canada and the total amount of work you completed at all such institutions combined is the equivalent of more than one year of bachelor's-level study in the US, its territories, or Canada, you must use this service.
  • To use LSAC's Authentication and Evaluation Service, you must register for CAS and you must request that the appropriate documents (e.g., mark sheets, academic records, diplomas, degree certifications, transcripts) be sent directly to LSAC from the institution(s) you attended.

Non Discrimination Policy

  • The University of Connecticut complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination, equal opportunity and affirmative action. The University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of legally protected characteristics in employment, education, the provision of services and all other programs and activities. In Connecticut, legally protected characteristics include: race; color; religion; ethnicity; age; sex; marital status; national origin; ancestry; sexual orientation; gender identity or expression; genetic information; veteran status; disability; and workplace hazards to reproductive systems. Employees, students, visitors and applicants with disabilities may request reasonable accommodations to address limitations resulting from a disability. The University engages in an interactive process with each person making a request for accommodations and reviews the requests on an individualized, case-by-case basis.

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2023 Law School Application Changes Compiled

In the wake of the recent Supreme Court decision on race-conscious admissions , we have seen more law schools making changes to their application components and instructions this cycle than in any other we can recall.

For easy reference, we will be compiling these changes below, adding new schools as their applications and instructions are posted.

Please note that, even though all of the below have been announced officially by the law schools, these questions are subject to change prior to the actual application opening date. You can find a list of all law schools' application opening dates here .

Updated October 2, 2023

Fall 2023 Law School Application Essay Changes

Yale law school.

Prior to this 2023-2024 cycle, Yale Law School's application required a Personal Statement and a 250-word essay on a subject of the applicant's choice. Applicants were also offered the option to write a Diversity Statement. This year, the application still requires a Personal Statement and 250-word essay, but in lieu of the Diversity Statement, there are now four different options for Optional Essays to write. Full instructions below.

New Yale Law Optional Essay Instructions: Source

Applicants may choose to submit an essay in response to one of the four questions below, each related to a value that is central to the Law School community. This is an opportunity to provide readers with relevant information that may not be found elsewhere in your application. If you choose to answer one of these questions, your essay should focus on your relevant personal, professional, and/or academic experiences and not on specific reasons why you wish to attend Yale Law School.

The optional essay should be approximately one page double-spaced. The prompts for the optional essay are as follows:

  • Option 1: The Law School has a strong tradition of public service and encourages its students to contribute to the community in a wide variety of ways. Describe a community that has been particularly meaningful to you. Discuss what you have gained from being a part of this community and what you have contributed to this community.
  • Option 2: The Law School encourages its students and alumni to be leaders, innovators, and changemakers across many different sectors. Describe one of your most important accomplishments and explain why it is important to you. Discuss how you demonstrated leadership, helped innovate, and/or drove change as part of that accomplishment.
  • Option 3: The Law School values determination and resilience and recognizes that these traits are critical to success at the Law School and in the legal profession. Describe a significant challenge, disappointment, or setback that you have faced. Discuss how you approached this experience and what you learned from it.
  • Option 4: In order to succeed at the Law School and in the legal profession, you must be able to have discussions across difference and be open to changing your mind. Describe a time when you changed your mind on an important topic after discussing it with a person with whom you disagreed or learning additional information. Discuss what you learned from this experience.

Harvard Law School

Prior to this year, Harvard Law required one two-page Personal Statement and gave applicants the option to submit an additional Diversity Statement. This year, HLS has replaced both with two required essays: a Statement of Purpose and a Statement of Perspective. Instructions below.

New Harvard Law Essay Instructions: Source

Every applicant must submit both a Statement of Purpose and a Statement of Perspective, responding to the prompts below. Each Statement must be one to two pages in length, using double-spacing, one-inch margins, and a font size that is comfortable to read (no smaller than 11 point). We expect every applicant to use at least one full page for each Statement.

Statement of Purpose: What motivates you to pursue law? How does attending law school align with your ambitions, goals, and vision for your future?

Statement of Perspective: The Admissions Committee makes every effort to understand who you are as an individual and potential Harvard Law School student and graduate. Please share how your experiences, background, and/or interests have shaped you and will shape your engagement in the HLS community and the legal profession.

University of Chicago Law School

Prior to this cycle, UChicago Law gave applicants the option to write a Diversity Statement. This year, they have removed that statement and now include the below prompt as an optional Addendum.

New UChicago Law Addendum Prompt Source: UChicago Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

UChicago Law aims to train well-rounded, critical, and socially conscious thinkers and doers. Describe how your background or experiences will contribute to the UChicago Law community. Example topics include: lessons you have learned; skillsets you have developed; obstacles you have overcome based on your background or upbringing; or topics you have become passionate about studying in law school based on your lived or educational experiences.

Columbia Law School

Prior to this 2023-2024 cycle, Columbia Law School asked for a traditional Personal Statement and gave applicants the option to write a Diversity Statement. This year, applicants will have the option to submit one Supplementary Statement from five options, which are included below.

New Columbia Law Supplementary Statement Options: Source: Columbia Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Optional Supplementary Statements. Please note that these questions are completely optional and if an applicant chooses not to submit a response to any of these questions, it will not have an impact on their admissions decision. Applicants should choose no more than one supplemental statement, which should be no longer than 500 words double spaced. Kindly note that supplemental statement may be shorter than 500 words.

  • A hallmark of the Columbia experience is being able to learn and thrive in an equitable and inclusive community with a wide range of perspectives. Tell us about an aspect of your own perspective, viewpoint or lived experience that is important to you, and describe how it has shaped the way you would learn from and contribute to Columbia’s diverse and collaborative community.
  • We recognize that many applicants have faced adversity in myriad ways and to varying extents throughout their lives. Tell us about an example of adversity or a challenging circumstance in your own life and describe how you overcame it and how that experience has shaped your life and your own perspective.
  • Columbia Law School aims to prepare its students to be advocates as well as effective leaders. Tell us about an example of leadership in your own life whether in an educational, professional, or personal setting and how those leadership skills and qualities would contribute to your legal education and the profession.
  • Columbia Law School’s mandatory pro bono program requires that every student devote at least 40 hours to public interest law service during their time in law school. Tell us about your own commitment to public service and describe how volunteer work, advocacy, community service, pro bono work, and/or extra-curricular activities have shaped who you are today and how you want to continue serving the public good during law school.
  • Tell us why you are applying to Columbia Law School and how the Law School's programs, faculty, curricular and extra-curricular offerings, location, and/or community would be a good fit for your legal education given your own academic, professional, or personal goals.

NYU School of Law

Prior to this year, NYU Law offered applicants the option to submit an Underrepresented Group statement. This year, that statement has been replaced by an Optional Additional Information attachment with the below prompt.

New NYU Law Optional Additional Information Prompt: Source: NYU Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

New York University School of Law seeks to enroll a student body from a broad spectrum of society. The Committee on Admissions encourages you to provide any information that may be helpful to us in reaching a thoughtful decision on your application. While the choice as to whether and what information to submit to the Committee is entirely yours, any information you provide will be used to give the Committee a more complete understanding of your academic, professional, and personal background; to help the Committee reach an informed decision on your application; and to aid the Committee in selecting a student body with a range of experiences.

This is an opportunity to share with the Committee information about how your background will enable you to contribute to the NYU Law community. Information that has been helpful in the past includes but is not limited to meaningful leadership experience; significant community involvement; personal/family history of educational or socioeconomic disadvantage or unusual circumstances which may have affected academic performance and how you exceled despite those circumstances; and skills you have developed to overcome adversity. This list is not all-inclusive, but we offer it for you to think about as you consider whether such information might be relevant in your case, and to assure you that it is quite appropriate.

University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Prior to this year, Penn Law gave applicants four choices for optional essays—one on diversity (wording changed this year, see below); one on core strengths, goals, and values (same this year); one asking, "What do you find valuable (or challenging) about a collaborative environment?" (removed this year); and one on reasons that the applicant's academic record or test scores do not accurately reflect their aptitude (i.e., a GPA/LSAT addendum) (same this year). This year's new prompts are below.

New Penn Law Optional Essay Prompts: Source

  • Penn Carey Law is committed to achieving an expansive and inclusive law school community that brings a diverse range of ideas, experiences, and perspectives to our classrooms. Tell us how your lived experience informs who you are today.
  • Describe a significant challenge you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge.
  • What strength or quality do you have that most people might not see or recognize?
  • What don't we see in your application file that you would like to share with the Admissions Committee?

University of Virginia School of Law

UVA Law added an optional "Why UVA Law" statement to their application this year (prompt below).

New "Why UVA Law" Statement Instructions: Source: UVA Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Why UVA Law (optional) (suggested page limit: two pages double-spaced in 12pt font)

We recognize that some applicants have personal reasons for applying to UVA Law. Such reasons might include, but are not limited to, being a child of someone who graduated from or works for UVA Law, being a descendant of ancestors who labored at UVA, prior participation in other UVA programs, specific interest in our academic offerings, and/or a personal connection to the Charlottesville area. If these reasons are not already addressed elsewhere in your application, you are welcome to include that information here. Please note this question is optional.

Duke University School of Law

Prior to this year, Duke Law required a Personal Statement and gave applicants the option of submitting either or both of two additional essays, a diversity statement and/or a statement of interest in Duke. This year, in addition to the Personal Statement and optional statement of interest in Duke, they are requiring applicants to write 1-2 short essays from a group of six prompts/options, all of which are listed below.

New Duke Law Short Answer Essay Instructions: Source

Short Answer Essay(s) (required): Our admissions process is guided by the view that a law school class that includes actively engaged students who possess a variety of skills, personal qualities, and life experiences helps to advance the Law School's mission, improves the learning process, and enriches the educational experience for all. Please write one or two short essays from the list below. Be sure to label the essay(s) you are answering and use only one attachment even if you submit two short answers. Please limit your answer(s) to approximately 250-500 words per essay.

  • What does the rule of law mean to you, and what special background or experience do you have that may help you contribute to its advancement or that underscores its importance to you personally?
  • The promise of equal justice is fundamental to our legal system. Why is equal justice important to you personally, and what personal experiences or knowledge do you have that may help you become an effective advocate for equal justice under law?
  • Exposure to a diversity of perspectives and experiences can enhance one's ability to deliver effective professional services. Please describe any opportunities you have had to serve clients or your community, either through work or on a volunteer basis, and how your own exposure to different perspectives and experiences helped you.
  • Lawyers are members of a learned profession, and are often called to serve the public in a variety of ways. Please describe your interest in public service and any experience that you have had to prepare you for a life of service in the public interest.
  • Please describe your interest in learning the law in an open, rigorous, and collaborative environment. Why is a commitment to the free expression of ideas so important in the learning process?
  • What does ethical leadership mean to you? Please provide examples of how you have prepared yourself to become an ethical leader.

University of Michigan Law School

Prior to this year, in addition to a Personal Statement, Michigan Law gave applicants the option to write 1-2 additional essays from a selection of prompts. Some of those prompts have been updated this year; full list below.

New Michigan Law Supplemental Essay Instructions: Source

Supplemental essays allow you an opportunity to provide us with relevant information that you were not able to include elsewhere in your application materials. If you think writing on any of the topics suggested would help us get a better sense of who you are, we encourage you to consider submitting your responses to one or two (but no more) of the following topics. Each essay should be between one and two pages. For ease of reading, please use double-spacing and at least an 11-point font. Please be sure to include the number of the prompt you are addressing at the top of your essay.

  • Essay One: Say more about your interest in the University of Michigan Law School. Why might Michigan be a good fit for you culturally, academically, or professionally?
  • Essay Two: Describe a challenge, failure, or setback you have faced and overcome, whether long-term and systemic (e.g., socioeconomic, health, or complex family circumstances) or short-term and discrete (e.g., a workplace scenario or a particularly demanding course). How did you confront it? What, if anything, might you do differently?  
  • Essay Three: How has the world you came from positively shaped who you are today?
  • Essay Four: Describe a quality or skill you have and discuss how you expect it will help you in your legal career.
  • Essay Five: Tell us about a time in the recent past when you changed your mind about something significant.
  • Essay Six: We seek students who are encouraging, kind, and collaborative, even when it is not convenient or easy. Describe a recent experience where you exhibited these characteristics.
  • Essay Seven: One of the goals of our admissions process is to enroll students who will enrich the quality and breadth of the intellectual life of our law school community, as well as to expand and diversify the identities of people in the legal profession. How might your experiences and perspectives contribute to our admissions goals?
  • Essay Eight: Think of someone who knows you, but doesn't know you well (i.e., not a family member or a close friend). How would they describe you? Would their description be accurate? Why or why not?
  • Essay Nine: If you could have dinner with any prominent person, living or dead, who would it be and why? What would you discuss?

UC Berkeley School of Law

This year, UC Berkeley Law added some additional language to their diversity-focused essay prompt and added a new optional statement on applicants' interest in the legal profession. The latter prompt also gives applicants the option to record a video submission in lieu of a written statement.

New UC Berkeley Law Optional Statement Prompts (including Kira video submission) Source

Perspective and Experiences:

How will you (your perspective, experience, Voice) contribute to diversity in our classrooms and community? Feel free to address any factors or attributes you consider important and relevant. In the past, applicants have included information about characteristics such as: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic background, first generation college or professional school student, student parent, re-entry student, geographic diversity, ideological diversity, and others. (500 word maximum)

Interest in the Legal Profession (Video Submission Option):

Please share more about why you are applying to law school by answering one or more of the following questions:

  • What about you (your experiences, your values, your perspective, etc.) calls you to law school?
  • How will you use your law degree with integrity, vision, creativity, and/or to innovate?
  • What makes you hopeful, optimistic, or excited about entering the legal profession?
  • How do you see yourself contributing to or advancing the public good as a lawyer, scholar, or advocate?

(4 minutes or 500 words maximum)

For the optional statement, “Interest in the Legal Profession,” applicants are invited to complete this statement in an alternative modality: video submission. This is not an interview. It is another opportunity to share insight into your potential for study at Berkeley Law, and it gives you an additional tool (video recording) for the communication and presentation of that information. You may also choose to complete this statement in written format.

Optional video statements, as with all statements, are unscored and intended only to augment your application. While we will consider the information shared and will use it within our holistic review of your application, no value will be assigned to whether you choose the written or video format.

Candidates will submit this statement via a free, third-party platform called Kira. Kira will allow you to respond to the prompt either via video recording or in writing and provides comprehensive support and trouble-shooting. Please only submit your response through Kira; written or video “Interest in the Legal Profession” statements sent separately will not be considered.

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Prior to this year, Northwestern Law offered one Optional Essay prompt asking about diversity. This year, they are offering applicants four different Optional Essay prompts, allowing applicants to respond to any or all of them.

New Northwestern Law Optional Supplemental Essay Instructions: Source: Northwestern Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Responding to the following questions is entirely optional and should not be viewed as required.  You may include responses to as many of the four optional essays as you wish or none at all.  These are intended to give you an opportunity to provide additional information that you were unable to include in other portions of the application.  Please limit your response to each essay that you complete to 1-2 pages, double-spaced, and at least an 11-point font.

  • Describe your interest in attending Northwestern Pritzker School of Law.
  • Describe any experiences in your life or unique qualities you think would benefit Northwestern Pritzker School of Law and/or your classmates.  (Relevant information may include but is not limited to financial hardship, educational adversity, special talents, work or community service experience, first generation or immigrant experience, an unusual rural or urban upbringing, foreign residence, military background, or unique family and/or personal circumstance.)
  • What does public service mean to you and how do you see yourself engaging in public service or pro-bono work to meet the needs of the underserved?
  • Did you face any particular challenges we should know about when considering your academic history or test scores?

Cornell Law School

Prior to this year, Cornell Law School offered an optional Diversity Statement. They have removed that prompt this year and added additional instructions to their personal statement (below). They also used to have a question in their application about reasons for applying to Cornell with a 600-character limit and the option to attach a longer essay. This year, they have made a one-page "Why Cornell" essay required.

New Cornell Law Personal Statement Prompt Source: Cornell Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

RESPOND TO AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING PROMPTS (required). YOU MAY RESPOND TO AS MANY AS YOU WISH, BUT DO NOT EXCEED A TOTAL OF FIVE (5) PAGES.

  • We aim to train excellent lawyers. GPAs and test scores have some predictive power, but they don't tell the whole story. Please describe any significant challenges you have overcome, including but not limited to economic hardship, discrimination, trauma, or disability, and/or significant accomplishments of which you are proud.
  • In the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War, Ezra Cornell wrote, "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study." For over 150 years, Cornell University has remained deeply committed to Ezra's vision. Explain how your life experiences will help inform your contributions to a law school learning community devoted to "...any person...any study." We encourage you to think broadly about what you will contribute to a law school class and eventually to the legal profession, including bu not necessarily to expertise you have, experiences you can share, and how communities of which you have been part have shaped your perspective.
  • From its founding, Cornell Law School has not only focused on producing excellent lawyers, but "lawyers in the best sense." A law school education teaches you a craft, and prepares you for a great career, but law is also a calling, and a lawyer in the best sense is one who will, in some way, serve justice. If your career goals include representing under-served populations or otherwise vulnerable individuals or groups, please tell us about those goals and how you hope to pursue them.
  • Is there anything else you wish the Admissions Committee to know about you beyond what you have revealed in other parts of your application? You can describe a formative experience, or your motivation to go to law school, or a story that reveals your character, personality, or strengths, or whatever else you think is relevant.

Georgetown University Law Center

Georgetown Law updated their "Diversity Statement" to an "Optional Statement" this year. Additionally, they updated their (separate) Optional Response prompts, as they have many times in the past. All of the new prompts are below.

New Georgetown Law Optional Statement & Optional Responses Prompts: Source: Georgetown Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Optional Statement:

If you would like to share any additional personal perspectives, reflections, or experiences – whether positive, challenging, a combination of both, or something else entirely – that have contributed to who you are as a person and as a future legal scholar and lawyer, we invite you to do so in an additional statement.

Optional Responses:

  • What’s the best (or worst) piece of advice you ever received?
  • If you could “uninvent” one thing, what would it be?
  • Tell us about a moment in your life that you regret.
  • Describe your perfect day.
  • Share a top ten list with us.
  • Prepare a one-minute video.

University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Law

UCLA Law slightly altered the wording of their optional "Challenges Addendum" this year. The updated prompt is below.

New UCLA Law Challenges Addendum Prompt: Source: UCLA Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Please share any information about adversity or challenge that you would like us to consider about your personal life experiences. This may include socio-economic challenges; educational challenges; health issues; disability; immigration status; surviving abuse; or complex family circumstances like an incarcerated parent, homelessness, living in foster care, or others. This is not an inclusive list, but simply an opportunity, if you wish, to share any additional aspects of your background that may give us a deeper sense of your strengths and who you are.

The University of Texas at Austin School of Law

Prior to this year, UT Law required a Personal Statement and gave applicants the option to submit a Statement of Economic, Social, or Personal Background. This year, they are giving applicants the option to write responses to one or both of two prompts, below.

New UT Law Optional Statement Instructions: Source

Applicants may submit one or more of the following optional statements to provide to the Admissions Committee additional insight when reviewing their application. Each optional statement may not exceed one (1) double-spaced page with a minimum 11-point font size and 1-inch margins.

  • Please address any information that you believe your application would be incomplete without and that sheds more light on your unique potential to succeed in the J.D. program and contribute to the University community and the field or profession.
  • Civil dialogue and reasoned debate over contested ideas are core values both for the practice of law and in legal education. In light of this, Texas Law is interested in learning about experiences you may have had engaging with ideas with which you disagreed, and how such experiences have impacted you.

Boston University School of Law

BU Law modified the language in their diversity-focused optional essay prompt this year. New language below.

New BU Law Optional Essay Prompt Source: BU Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Consistent with the American Bar Association, Boston University School of Law believes that knowledge about bias, cross-cultural competency (ability to understand people from different backgrounds and engage with them effectively), and racism are central to the legal profession. Please tell us how your education, training, or lived experience has deepened your knowledge about bias, cross-cultural competency, and racism and/or prepared you to explore these topics at BU Law.

Vanderbilt Law School

Prior to this cycle, Vanderbilt Law allowed applicants to submit an optional diversity statement. This cycle, a Lived Experience Statement (full prompt below) is required from all applicants.

New Vanderbilt Law Lived Experience Statement Prompt: Source: Vanderbilt Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

The quality and vibrance of the educational environment at Vanderbilt Law arise from enrolling a student body with a broad mix of individual backgrounds, experiences, skills, knowledge, and interests. Please tell us about any aspects of your background and experience that you believe would contribute to the educational environment.

University of Florida Levin College of Law

Prior to this year, UF Law included a Diversity Statement prompt that they have removed this year. Source: UF Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

George Washington University Law School

GW Law altered their optional Identity Statement prompt this year—new prompt below.

New GW Law Identity Statement Prompt: Source: GW Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

We are proud of the perspectives brought to the GW Law community by individuals from around the United States and the world. To that end, how has your identity contributed to the person that you are today? Examples might include, but are not limited to, lived experiences, obstacles overcome, areas of intellectual or professional interest, background/upbringing, and service.

University of Georgia School of Law

UGA Law has kept their optional Diversity Statement this year. The slightly altered prompt is below.

New UGA Law Diversity Statement Prompt: Source: UGA Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

The School of Law believes the overall educational environment of the law school may be enhanced by life experiences that significantly add to the academic, cultural, geographic, or socioeconomic diversity of the student population. You are invited to explain how your own life experiences would significantly add to the diversity of the student population and enhance the educational climate of the law school. This may also include discussion of your status as a first-generation college graduate or veteran.

Notre Dame Law School

Notre Dame Law has updated the wording of their Different Kind of Lawyer Statement prompt this year—full text below.

New Notre Dame Law Different Kind of Lawyer Statement Prompt: Source: Notre Dame Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

The mission of Notre Dame Law School is to educate a "Different Kind of Lawyer" - one who sees the law as more than just a profession, but as a service to others. Students are encouraged to explore not only the moral and ethical dimensions of the law but also their unique roles in furthering the cause of justice.

Following the murder of George Floyd, Dean G. Marcus Cole wrote an open letter to the Notre Dame Law Community in June 2020 in which he stated the following:

One thing that each and every one of us can do is to end the cycle of hate by ending the separation that leads to it.... Each of us needs to get to know people who differ from us. We must all make a conscious decision and effort to expand our circles.

Considering the mission of Notre Dame Law School, Dean Cole's open letter, and his call to action, please provide a response to one or both of the following:

  • What experiences, hardships, or adversity have you faced that have shaped your perspective on law and justice?
  • How has your own circle, culture, and community inspired you, your morals and ethics?

The "Different Kind of Lawyer" statement must be the applicant's own work in their own words. It should be no more than two double-spaced pages. If an applicant plans on providing this statement, it must be included with their application at the time of submission. The statement's header must include the applicant's name, LSAC account number, and be titled "DKL Statement."

University of Minnesota Law School

Prior to this year, Minnesota Law offered applicants the option to write a one-page Diversity Statement. This year, applicants will have the option to submit a one-page Supplemental Statement answering the below (similar) prompt.

New Minnesota Law Supplemental Statement Prompt: Source: Minnesota Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Applicants may attach additional statements to highlight or discuss any of the following: Unique backgrounds and lived experiences; demonstrated commitment to racial justice/equity; obstacles or adversity overcome; absences or breaks in academic history; or other matters that may be of importance to the Admissions Committee. Each additional statement should be no more that one-page, double spaced.

USC Gould School of Law

USC has updated their Diversity Statement this year to be a "Diversity of Background and/or Experience Statement"—prompt below. They also removed the prompt for a "Why USC" statement that had previously been an optional essay.

New USC Law Diversity of Background and/or Experience Statement Instructions: Source

USC Gould's admissions process is guided by the view that an individual student that reflects the broad and rich diversity of our society provides a superior educational environment for all law students. The primary goal of our admissions process is to enroll students who demonstrate outstanding academic and professional promise and whose background and experience will enrich USC Gould's educational environment or enhance the diversity of our student body or the legal profession.

  • Based on the above, we invite you to discuss any ways in which your lived experiences offer a unique ability that you may contribute to the Gould School of Law. Examples include (but are not limited to) students who:
  • Have overcome racial discrimination if that is tied to the student's courage and determination.
  • Have been motivated by your heritage or culture to assume a leadership role or attain a particular goal.
  • Have struggled against prejudice, economic disadvantage, family or personal adversity, or other social hardships (perhaps as a result of disability, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation or religious affiliation)
  • Have lived in a foreign country or spoke a language other than English at home
  • Have unusual career goals, employment history (perhaps military or law enforcement experience) or educational background (including graduate study)
  • Demonstrate unusual extracurricular achievement (including school or community service)

Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

ASU Law added a new "elevator pitch video" to their application this year.

New ASU Law Elevator Pitch Video Instructions: Source: ASU Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

You may submit an optional elevator pitch video as part of your ASU Law application in addition to your written materials. The elevator pitch is a concise and compelling summary of yourself that shows your oral advocacy skills. The video should be no longer than 30 seconds. You may only submit one video.

University of Illinois College of Law

Illinois Law added seven Supplemental Essay prompts to their application this year.

New Illinois Law Supplemental Essay Options: Source: Illinois Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Supplemental essays allow you an opportunity to provide us with relevant information that you were not able to include elsewhere in your application materials or that did not fit thematically with your personal statement.  If you think writing on any of the topics below would help us get a better understanding of what you individually bring to the law school class, we encourage you to consider submitting your responses to one or two (but no more) of the following topics.  Your response to each essay should be less than 500 words. Please use a minimum of 11 point font and double space your responses.  Please be sure to include the number of the prompt you are addressing at the top of your essay.

Essay Prompt #1

Describe a challenge, failure, or setback you have faced and overcome, whether long-term and systemic ( e.g., socioeconomic, health, or complex family circumstances) or short-term and discrete ( e.g., a workplace scenario or a particularly demanding course).  How did you confront it?  What, if anything, might you do differently?

Essay Prompt #2

Describe a quality or skill you have and discuss how you expect it will help you in your legal career.

Essay Prompt #3

Tell us about a time in the recent past when you changed your mind about something significant.

Essay Prompt #4

Our law school culture is one of encouragement, cooperation, and collaboration. We actively seek out students who exhibit those characteristics, even when it is not convenient or easy.  Describe a recent experience when you exhibited any or all of these characteristics.

Essay Prompt #5

One of the goals of our admissions process is to enroll students who will enrich the quality and breadth of the intellectual life of our law school community and the legal profession.  How have your lived experiences and perspectives positively shaped who you are today in a way that contributes to our admissions goals?

Essay Prompt #6

Think of someone who knows you in an academic or professional setting, but doesn't know you well ( i.e., not a family member or a close friend).  How would they describe your work ethic, written or oral communication skills, and/or professionalism?  Would their description be accurate?  Why or why not?

Essay Prompt #7

Provide insight into your potential to contribute to a community of inclusion, belonging, and respect in which scholars with varied perspectives, abilities, and experiences can learn and [sic].

University of North Carolina School of Law

Prior to this cycle, UNC Law required two written statements—one essentially asking "Why law?" and the other "Why UNC?"—and gave applicants the option to submit two additional statements—one on diversity and one functioning as a place for an LSAT/GPA addendum.

This year, the optional diversity-related prompt has been removed, but the required "Why UNC?"-type prompt (Statement Topic 2 in the application) has been updated to include new language asking about how applicants will "contribute to the breadth of perspectives" at the law school. Full prompt below.

New UNC Law Statement Topic 2 Instructions: Source: UNC Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

What is your reason for choosing the University of North Carolina School of Law? How does the institution meet your educational and/or your professional goals? Please include how your academic background, personal qualities, and life experiences inform your pursuit of legal education at Carolina Law and how you will contribute to the breadth of perspectives in the law classroom and broader law school community.

Florida State University College of Law

Prior to this year, FSU Law gave applicants the option to submit a Diversity Statement. That statement has been removed this year, and an optional Seminole Statement has been added—prompt below.

New FSU Law Seminole Statement Instructions: Source: FSU Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

Located within the heart of Tallahassee, the capital city of Florida, Florida State University College of Law is surrounded by a vibrant legal community.  As Florida has the third largest economy of any state in the United States, there are ample opportunities to practice law in a rich variety of settings – law firms, state government, local and municipal government, courts, associations, non-profit organizations, business settings, and more – which work to serve the legal needs of a diverse clientele made up of a variety of cultures, traditions, histories, languages, and backgrounds.  Florida State University College of Law is a values-based and purpose-driven law school that embraces all perspectives, backgrounds, and students.  FSU College of Law is consistently ranked one of the top schools in terms of student satisfaction – and that is due to the emphasis on creating a culture of belonging, where every person feels valued and has an opportunity to contribute.

In no more than two typed pages (double-spaced, using a 12 point font), please feel free to submit a Seminole Statement to provide the Admissions Committee with insights and examples from your life to share a quality of your character, and/or a unique ability that you possess to describe how you would uniquely contribute to the academic and student communities at the Florida State University College of Law.

Wake Forest University School of Law

This year, Wake Forest Law added a required Imagining Your Future statement and updated the language of their Optional Statement. Both prompts are below.

Source: Wake Forest Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

New Wake Forest Law Imagining Your Future Statement Prompt:

Upload a brief descriptive statement of a job, in terms of the job title and responsibilities, you envision holding (or hope to hold), a decade after graduating from law school and being admitted to the bar.

New Wake Forest Law Optional Statement Prompt:

You may upload an optional statement describing any other information about yourself that you wish to share that is not included in your personal statement.

Examples of optional statement topics include, but are not limited to:

  • interest or preference in attending Wake Forest Law compared to other law schools;
  • describe how the ethos of Wake Forest University’s motto, Pro Humanitate (“for humanity”), applies to your past experiences and your plans for the future as a law student and attorney.

Uploading an optional statement is not required. There is a separate optional upload for an addendum related to test scores and academic performance.

William & Mary Law School

W&M Law has modified their Optional Essay prompt and removed the description "Diversity & Inclusion Statement." The full updated prompt is below.

New W&M Law Optional Essay Instructions: Source: W&M Law Fall 2024 JD Application (LSAC)

You are invited to submit an essay that describes your life experiences with an emphasis on how the perspectives that you have acquired would contribute to the William & Mary Law School’s intellectual community and enhance the diversity of the student body. Examples of topics include (but are not limited to): an experience of prejudice, bias, economic disadvantage, personal adversity, or other social hardship (perhaps stemming from one’s religious affiliation, disability, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity); experience as a first-generation college student; significant employment history (such as in business, military or law enforcement, or public service); experience as an immigrant or refugee; graduate study; or impressive leadership achievement (including college or community service).  Please be as concise as possible.

US News & World Report – EDU

Law School Optional Essays: What to Know

E very law school requires applicants to submit a personal statement, typically limited to two or three double-spaced pages, along with a resume typically limited to two pages. These two documents provide applicants with their chief opportunities to detail their interests, goals and path to law school.

Beyond those core documents, many law schools allow other essays, usually optional but sometimes required. Most prominent is a type of essay that used to be called a diversity statement. 

Diversity, Perspective or Background Statements

Until recently, almost every law school offered an optional diversity statement. Prompts for diversity statements varied among law schools, but typically concerned an applicant’s identity and background, past hardships or potential to contribute to a diverse and inclusive campus environment.

After the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed race-conscious admissions policies in June 2023, law schools adapted diversity statements in different ways, which will likely continue to evolve over future admissions cycles.

Currently, most law schools offer one or more optional essay prompts that give applicants an opportunity to discuss their perspective, identity, personal adversity, experience interacting with diverse viewpoints or other topics related to diversity.

While it’s hard to generalize about all these essay prompts, they still differ from personal statements in many ways. They are more reflective, looking backward rather than forward. They often have tighter page or word limits.

The purpose of these optional statements is not solely for applicants to detail their unique background. Everyone is atypical in some ways . Rather, these optional essays are intended to free applicants from having to weave together their background and interests within the same two-page statement.

For example, imagine an Armenian American inspired by the trauma of the Armenian genocide to become an international human rights lawyer. This would make a great topic for a personal statement.

But what if that applicant actually feels most passionate about securities law? It would be counterproductive to force such a candidate to awkwardly cram genocide and securities law into the same essay. This is why schools allow applicants space to tell more complicated stories. 

Other Optional Law School Admission Essays

Beyond personal and diversity statements, some law schools also allow or require extra short essays. Most commonly, a school might ask about why an applicant would be a good fit for the school, often called a “Why this law school?” essay . These are almost always worthwhile to write.

Some schools have short-answer questions on topics like an applicant’s career goals or how an applicant aligns with the school’s values. A few schools, like Stanford University Law School in California and Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., have offbeat essay prompts that tend to vary from year to year.

Finally, some law schools provide dedicated space for applicants wishing to explain issues often covered by an addendum , like underperformance on standardized tests or in their transcripts. 

Are Optional Essays Worth Writing?

A classic mistake applicants make is to write as much as allowed , hoping that something will stick. Many law school applicants fear that if they fail to maximize every possible opportunity to write about themselves, they will appear lazy or disinterested. Therefore, they sabotage themselves by padding their application with redundant and repetitive text.

Applicants can best show their professionalism, communication skills and respect for the reader by writing efficiently and purposefully. Admissions officers have a limited amount of time, perhaps a matter of minutes, to review your application. Anything you write that does not contribute to a coherent argument for your admission risks wasting that time.

Thus, an optional essay is unnecessary if its key points are already adequately communicated through the personal statement or other materials. Optional essays should be used strategically to build your argument for admission. Don’t simply talk about yourself to fill space.

For example, if an optional essay prompt asks for your favorite book, there is no need to lie and claim that it is "The Common Law" by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

On the other hand, before you write about your love of "Harry Potter," consider whether and how that would bolster your application. Unless you can trace your interest in justice to Hermione’s efforts to emancipate house elves, you might be better off choosing another book or skipping the essay altogether.

In sum, optional essays should convey or emphasize something about you that your personal statement and other materials fail to address. If you cannot think of anything else that would strengthen your case, then forgo the essay. Like a lawyer, show meticulousness and fine judgment with restraint, not verbosity.

Copyright 2024 U.S. News & World Report

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Writing a Personal Statement for Law School

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yale law school application essay

Writing a Personal Statement for Law School was originally published on College Recruiter .

In order to gain entrance into law school, prospective students are required to write an essay detailing the reasons why they want to become lawyers. Unlike the college entrance application, personal statements for law school are essays that have an open format. Successful lawyers are high achievers long before they enter law school. They exude confidence and accomplish their goals. When you write your law school statement, you need to write in a way that shows your skills, competence, and achievements. Think of the person reading your essay as you write. He or she will want to know what you have to offer society as a lawyer. That person also has an interest in your motivations for wanting to be a lawyer and what it is that makes you a better prospect than other law school applicants. Remember that admissions officers review hundreds of applications. Tell them the true story of the things in your life that made you decide to become an attorney. Do not embellish or say anything false because they will see through it. Do not use cliches that you have heard from someone else or tell them what you think they want to hear. For instance, if you really enjoy helping the homeless, write it down in such a way that it shows your reasons rather than telling them. What qualifies you to be a lawyer? What character traits, skills, and talents do you have that would make you a good lawyer? Describe everything you know about yourself that you feel qualifies you above other people. Don’t be disingenuous by exaggerating your skills and accomplishments. If you have any weaknesses that you feel may potentially disqualify you from law school, how do you get around them in your personal statement? That is a tough question. If you have a period of time where you had below average grades, using excuses is not the solution to your dilemma. Try to find something positive that you learned that helps you overcome the flaw. In the case of grades, you could tell how you improved them. One writer’s technique that works effectively on essays and personal statements is active voice. Use active verbs in your senses. Passive voice sounds weak and that is not the way you want to come across to the admissions board. That however does not mean that you should try to impress anyone with your knowledge of legal terminology. A personal statement does not mean writing your complete personal life memoirs. In other words, don’t write a book. Instead, write a 1 to 2 page statement using the tips contained here. When you’re finished, ask people you know to read your statement. Take their suggestions seriously. This is perhaps the most important step of all in writing your personal statement. Revise once. Set it down for a day. Revise twice. Set it down for another day. Read it again and revise and edit once more. Let someone read it again and get their opinion of your statement. Writing our personal statement for law school is not rocket science. When you put the time and effort into writing it, you will likely end up with a personal statement that will effectively get the notice of the Board of Admissions. Tip: Get a head start on writing your own personal statement by starting with a sample personal statement . Your writing will be faster, easier, and more professional as a result. Jason Kay is a professional writer offering advice in a number of areas including resume writing and personal statement writing. You can learn more useful tips at his resume writing blog .

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Earning a JD degree from an ABA-approved law school is the most straightforward path to becoming a lawyer in the United States. But becoming a lawyer isn't the only career path a JD degree can open up for you. The skills you learn in law school can benefit you in a variety of professions.

Most JD programs are full time and take three years to complete. However, part-time programs are becoming more common. These programs can generally be completed in four years.

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Using LSAC’s  Official Guide , you can search for schools by location, keyword, and UGPA/LSAT combination to find the best law school for you. Each school profile also provides links to the institution’s most up-to-date information on admission requirements, tuition, special programs, and more.

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Harold J. Berman, 89, Who Altered Beliefs About Origins of Western Law, Dies

By Douglas Martin

  • Nov. 18, 2007

Harold J. Berman, a scholar whose expertise in Russian law took him to a Soviet courtroom to fight for royalties owed Arthur Conan Doyle, and whose forceful scholarship altered thinking about Western law’s origins, died on Nov. 13 in Brooklyn. He was 89.

His daughter Jean Berman announced his death.

Mr. Berman wrote 25 books and more than 400 articles on subjects as diverse as Russian culture and comparative legal history. They were published in over 20 languages.

He taught for 37 years at Harvard Law School, where he was the Ames professor of law. He then taught for two decades at Emory University School of Law as the Robert W. Woodruff professor.

Mr. Berman relished unexplored intellectual geography. When he decided to study Soviet law as a World War II Army veteran at Yale Law School, there was no one to teach it. So he taught himself, starting with the Russian language.

The language training served him well in Moscow in 1958, in the first case he ever argued. Representing the estate of Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes, he sought to extract royalties from the Soviet state on millions of Conan Doyle books sold in the Soviet Union. Winning in a Moscow city court, he later lost the case on appeal to a higher Russian Federation court.

At the time, he was a professor at Harvard Law School, one of the first Yale graduates to have that title. His research there questioned whether the commonly understood underpinnings of Western law were too narrow. Inspired by Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, who taught him at Dartmouth as an undergraduate, Mr. Berman saw Western history as a river whose course was repeatedly changed by transforming revolutions. But Mr. Berman added important wrinkles: the importance of law as an independent historical force in its own right — not just a reflection of other forces like economics — and an emphasis on the link between religious tradition and law.

His most influential work was “Law and Revolution” (1983), which rejected the old idea that modern legal systems began in the 16th century. He argued that the 11th-century rise of papal authority with its own canon law jump-started modern law.

The journal Constitutional Commentary said in 2005 that the book had become “the standard point of departure for work in the field.” The American Political Science Review said, “This may be the most important book on law in our generation.”

In 2004, Mr. Berman published “Law and Revolution II: The Impact of the Protestant Reformation on the Western Legal Tradition.” This explored how the 16th-century German Reformation and the 17th-century English Revolution gave birth to a new civil order apart from religion. Soon, marriage certificates came from civil agencies, and church law governed only churches.

Mr. Berman often left the ivory tower. In 2005, he joined the religious broadcaster Pat Robertson in writing a brief to defend the Ten Commandments monument on the grounds of the Texas Capitol. He called the commandments a foundation of Texas law, and noted that the Declaration of Independence invoked God.

Harold Joseph Berman was born on Feb. 13, 1918, in Hartford. Under a theory he enunciated in 2006 for The Fulton County Daily Report, an Atlanta legal and business newspaper, he said that he, like all children, had been a law student from a young age.

“A child says, ‘It’s my toy.’ That’s property law,” he said. “A child says, ‘You promised me.’ That’s contract law. A child says, ‘He hit me first.’ That’s criminal law. A child says, ‘Daddy said I could.’ That’s constitutional law.”

Mr. Berman graduated from Dartmouth, where he was editor in chief of the college newspaper. He studied legal history at the London School of Economics and earned a master’s degree in history from Yale.

After a year at Yale Law School, he was drafted into the Army and later awarded a Bronze Star for his work as a cryptographer. After finishing at Yale, he taught at Stanford for a year and joined Harvard in 1948.

In the 1950s, even when McCarthyism reigned, Mr. Berman often visited the Soviet Union to study and teach. He was a frequently cited source of news about changes in Soviet law in the 1950s, when Communist leaders were liberalizing government and society after Stalin’s death.

His stays were so long that he enrolled his children in Soviet schools. His wife, the former Ruth Carol Harlow, started Moscow’s first P.T.A.

In addition to his wife, of 66 years, Mr. Berman is survived by his sons Stephen, of Ashland, Ore., and John, of São Paulo, Brazil; his daughters Jean Berman of Brooklyn, and Susanna Omac of Temecula, Calif., seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Mr. Berman had planned a third volume in his Law and Revolution series, and was even planning a fourth. Speaking to the Fulton County newspaper, he was philosophical about the prospects of finishing.

“It’s up to God — if he wants to read it or not,” he said.

Teaching & Learning

Harold j. berman, 1918-2007, a scholar of great social account.

Professor Emeritus Harold J. Berman, an expert on comparative, international and Russian law as well as legal history and philosophy and the intersection of law and religion, died Nov. 13. He was 89.

Known for his energetic and outgoing personality, Berman recently celebrated his 60th anniversary as a law professor. He joined the Harvard Law School faculty in 1949 and held the Story Professorship of Law and later the Ames Professorship of Law. A prolific scholar, Berman wrote 25 books and more than 400 scholarly articles, including his magnum opus, “Law and Revolution: The Formation of the Western Legal Tradition.”

“Harold was a scholar of boundless and lofty ambition,” said HLS Professor Emeritus Henry Steiner ’55. “His projects reached deeply not only into comparative analysis and history, but also religion and jurisprudence. This is a record that any distinguished scholar would take pride in.”

Born in 1918 in Hartford, Conn., Berman received a bachelor’s from Dartmouth College in 1938 and a master’s in history from Yale University in 1942. After a year at Yale Law School, he was drafted by the Army and served as a cryptographer in Europe, earning a Bronze Star. He returned to New Haven and finished his degree in 1947.

Berman’s interest in the Soviet legal system began during his law school years, when he studied Russian and taught himself Soviet law. He argued his first case in Moscow in 1958, representing the estate of Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes. Seeking to obtain royalties from the Soviet state on the millions of Conan Doyle books sold in the Soviet Union, Berman won the case in a Moscow city court. He later lost on appeal to a higher Russian Federation court.

Berman was a frequent visitor to Russia as a guest scholar and lecturer. As a result of his firsthand knowledge of the Soviet Union—rare for an American in the Cold War era—he became a leading consultant to Russian officials in the mid-1980s during glasnost and perestroika.

HLS Professor Emeritus Detlev Vagts ’51 was part of a group of academics Berman brought together to teach what they referred to as “capitalist law” in the Soviet Union during that time. Vagts recalled the challenges of their task:

“The young Muscovites had been trained to think of the act of two persons getting together to buy goods low and sell them high as a conspiracy to profiteer—which would get you five years of re-education in Siberia. Now they had to adjust to the idea that it was a legitimate partnership,” he said. “The first Russian law on corporations was drafted by lawyers who could not bear to use the term ‘capital’ for the account in the lower right corner of the balance sheet; they called it ‘the social account’ instead.”

In 1985, faced with the prospect of mandatory retirement, Berman left HLS for Emory Law School. At Emory, he held the Robert W. Woodruff Professorship of Law—the highest honor Emory bestows on a faculty member—for more than 20 years. He was the principal founder of the American Law Center in Moscow, a joint venture of Emory and the Law Academy of the Russian Ministry of Justice. He was also co-chairman of Emory’s World Law Institute, an organization that sponsors educational programs around the world.

Reflecting another of his long-term interests, Berman helped to develop Emory’s Center for the Study of Law and Religion. In 2003, he published “Law and Revolution, II: The Impact of the Protestant Reformations on the Western Legal Tradition.”

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  10. How to Get Into Yale Law School

    Yale Law School Acceptance Rate: 5.5%. The Yale Law School acceptance rate is 5.5%. In the most recent admissions cycle, 246 students were offered admission out of 4,471 applicants. To give you some more insight into Yale Law's acceptance trends, here are the acceptance rates from the past few years: Year. Number of Applicants.

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  23. Admissions

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